How do I wire a Engle to the back of my ute??

Submitted: Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:00
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Could someone please tell me in normal lanuage how to wire a connection for the engle in the back of my ute. I have a little electrical knowledge. I realise that I need to use 6-8mm cable and I need positive and negitive cable, but do I need an inline fuse near the battery.
Any help would be great as an autoelectrician wants to charge anywhere from $150-$200
Thanks
Jodie
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Reply By: porl - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:10

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:10
I have to do this too.

You need a fuse at both ends.

My Q is do I do it along the chassis or through the main cab and out the back of it into the ute, though from a cursory insepction I can't see how that's done without drilling into the back of the cab. I got a dual cab hilux 2000 model.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:49

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:49
Its far from rocket science `do it whichever way is easiest and will keep the cables best protected. if theres no rubber bung going ito the tray then yea a drill is needed. as for the female end of the plug they are available from engle suppliers and come with fuses although additional fuses close to the battery wouldnt hurt.
Fill the small hole youve drilled with silastic and maybe take the oportunity to also use the wiring for a couple of rear cigg plugs and a fluro light
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Follow Up By: porl - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:56

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:56
And if I am going to drill a hole in my styleside I am going to first paint that hole with a zinc paint. Stuff you use after a weld etc or a spray on one, I would cry if I went back in a couple years and could poke my hole through a slowly spreading rust hole. Have seen this happen in home snorkel jobs.
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Follow Up By: obee - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 18:07

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 18:07
I have a hilux 2001 dueal cab. There is a plug on the right hand rear corner of the cab and I put a hole in it. Then I ran the wires in the channel and out into the inside where the the front door is hinged. Then up under the mat and into the engine bay through another plug. I put a fuse up close to the battery. I dont see the need for more than one fuse.

At the rear I ran the wires straight up and over into the tray between the fibreglass canopy and fitted anderson plugs to take the fridge and supply to the battery and generator. I put a solonoid in the engine bay that is powered from the windscreen wiper and therefore only comes on when the ignition is on. If you want to run power from the cranking battery when stationary then the solonoid is not neccessary.

I need to put some protection around the wires between where they leave the channel and go the the tray but no hurry on that one. It can wait tilll I run an extra pair of wires to ensure plenty of charging current to the aux battery in the tray. I will eventually put a switch on the primary solonoid feed so I dont have to unplug the solonoid when the circuit is not needed.

hope this helps

Owen
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Follow Up By: porl - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 22:28

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 22:28
Thanks Owen, that's put me on a good track.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 22:51

Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 22:51
I would run in in hard plastic ribbed covering and run it along the chassis rails wouldnt worry about thru the cabin, and you definitely only need one fuse. Make sure that the plug you will wire in has terminals big enough for the 6-8mm cable (I would run 8mm)
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Reply By: Member -Signman - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:32

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:32
jodie
Without trying to be a smart arze..if you don't think you're capable at doing the job- $150 to a sparky might be cheap!!
Or you could come over th my place and I'll do it for $149.00

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Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:51

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 16:51
Most places that sell Engels also sell a cable and socket specifically designed to take the Engel cig plug after the little tip is removed. That is, it is a socket that takes the 2 pin plug with a secure threaded connection. It contains an in-line fuse. All you have to do is connect it to the positive and negative battery terminals, mount the socket where the fridge will be and plug the fridge in.

Easy as pie.

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Follow Up By: jodie0075 - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 17:56

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 17:56
Have just checked them out.. BCF have them for $59.00 huge saving!! Thanks a heap Gone Bush :)
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Follow Up By: Gone Bush (WA) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 18:35

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 18:35
You're welcome Jodie.

Don't forget, you can unscrew the tip of the Engel cig plug which will reveal a threaded two pin arrangement. Do this and you will have a secure connection into the socket that you are buying that will not come undone with vibrations. It can only go in one way so there is no chance of cross polarising the connection.

Remove the fuse while doing the installation and put it back into the holder after everything is done.

Put the removed tip in a safe place in case you want to re-use it one day (like in a plastic zip top sandwich bag then in the side pouch of the Engel transit bag if you have it).

cheers.

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 18:48

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 18:48
There is no better socket either!
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Follow Up By: Member - Matt H (SA) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 22:08

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 22:08
Shaker & Gone Bush,
The Engel plug is "ok" by my book. Since 1991 when I "saw the light" and changed to an Engel (from a Chescold 3 Way- great fridge, just rotten on 12V), I have used a Hella marine plug - 2 terminal jobbie that has screw up locking collar that prevents disconnection (the pins are different diameters to aviod reverse polarity connections too). The plug and socket costs around $20 from REPCO. It has got us everywhere, including the Cape and NEVER failed. You get what you pay for!
Wiring wise: the KISS principal applies. My Engel has been in 6 different vehicles so far and I have used the same principal every time. That is, Heavy twin core flex from the battery to the fridge, with ONE fuse (10 AMP) wired in line on the positive side, and within 300mm of the battery. There are enough blanked off grommets in cars these days to route cables without the need to drill holes. IF it doesn't have grommets, you'll need to drill your own holes - dont worry - as long as you put in a grommet to protect the wiring from chafing - you'll be right. If the hole is subject to outside weather conditions or road grime-then paint the hole edges before installing the grommet. Matt's tip: SOLDER EVERY WIRE JOIN AND INSULATE IN HEATSHRINK! This almost garantees longevity - Hey, 18 years in the RAAF has taught a thing or two!

Cheers, Matt
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Follow Up By: Gone Bush (WA) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 23:51

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 23:51
Matt, appreciate your suggestion but once the "tip" on the Engel plug is unscrewed it produces exactly what you've described: a 2 pin, anti-polarising, threaded collar plug.

cheers

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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 23:55

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 23:55
I disagree shaker if i wiggle mine a bit the fridge gos on and off and has been the cause of dramas. am considering hardwiring it as i suspect it is causing reduced performance
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 00:00

Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 00:00
I had heaps of problems before I fitted the Engel socket, been all through the Outback & High Country since with no further problems.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 01:03

Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 01:03
Yea prob a random problem. checked the actual clips and seem fine- cant figure out why there shoulf be a problem
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Follow Up By: Member - Matt H (SA) - Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 14:34

Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 14:34
Gone Bush,
Fair point mate, however the Hella item is made of chrome plated brass and designed for marine applications. The Engel plug is made from plastic. That speaks for itself. I, like Davoe, had connectivity issues with the original Engel plug - hence my change. No doubt 17 year's of product R & D has improved the design of the plug - I'd hope! Check Engeland's website for hella marine plugs - they are the $32.70 ones. Can be bought cheaper elsewhere though.
Looking at the times you guys posted replies, you must be night owls! :-)
Cheers, Matt

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Follow Up By: Gone Bush (WA) - Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 23:16

Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 23:16
Hullo Matt,

yeah, the Hella plugs & sockets are great. In WA we also have Arrid plugs & sockets, very similar.

Arrid Plugs & Sockets

Like you, I actually prefer these too but Jodie's original post indicated a preference for an easy solution.

cheers from one of the many night owls on this Forum.
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Follow Up By: Member - Matt H (SA) - Sunday, Apr 13, 2008 at 20:41

Sunday, Apr 13, 2008 at 20:41
Hi Gone Bush,
I agree Jodie is after an easy solution. Maybe it's my upbringing, but sometimes the easiest solution is not the best. Jodie: hang in there - I'm not trying to baffle you with BS, but having seen vehicles get burnt out due to dodgy wiring - I'd rather not see you be one of them!
OK. THE simplest, cheapest and safest solution for you is possibly this: Purchase a length of heavy duty (rated to handle 20 amps minimum) 12 volt 2 core flex (Dick Smith's or similar) of adequate length. 15 metres of it would be a guide depending on the size of your ute. Also purchase an in line fuse holder and fuse rated at 10 Amps. Run the cable from your battery through to the tray. I'd then cut the 12 volt plug off the supplied Engel lead and join it to the flex you have just run - terminated and insulated appropriately. Add the fuse holder to the battery end (no more than 300mm from the battery) of the positive lead. No other plugs or connectors would be needed.
This is a very simplistic overview, but a competent auto electrician or electrical type person should know this and could assist. The main problems that are encountered with dodgy wiring could include; size of wiring being too small to handle the current load, wire chaffing due to incorrect routing, or inadequate protection of wire when passed through metal panels, and lack of a fuse.
There are many more, but I have the bloomin' lurgy and am heading to bed!

Cheers, Matt
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Reply By: oldtrack123 - Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 22:33

Friday, Apr 11, 2008 at 22:33
A fuse @ the battery end, in the positive lead is essential.{;10 amp fuse}
You need it to protect your wiring & vehicle against shorts which could occur due to abrasion & rubbing & could cause a FIRE.
MAKE sure you get a good quality one
Use a short length of cable to get the fuse away from baterry fumes ,acid etc
You do not need a fuse at the fridge end.
Protect the cables with rubber or even plastic garden hose where they go thro metal or other areas where they may be damaged
AnswerID: 298056

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 10:19

Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 10:19
The problem in using an Engel socket to terminate the cable in the rear, is that you are restricted to an Engel patch lead.

A cheaper solution is to install a "Merrit" style socket (or two) which are available from TJM, Battery World, etc for around $15.00.

I adapted an Engel lead and fitted a Merrit, or Hella brand plug.
These plugs have a removable collar and enable you to plug them into either the Merrit socket, or with the collar, a standard cigarette sytel socket.

An "in-line" fuse holder (blade type is best to match the fuses used elsewhere in the vehicle) can be bought cheaply from Repco.
A rating of 10 amps will protect the circuit.

Jodie,

As the Engel does not have a built in low voltage cutout, I would strongly recommend you include such a device to protect the battery from being flattened.
The Projecta one is cheap ($30) and adequate, although I didn't like the ciggy style plug & socket and changed them for the above mentioned Merrit socket and Hella (Din) style plug.

Bill


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Reply By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 22:54

Saturday, Apr 12, 2008 at 22:54
Where are you located Jodie? I am sure one could arrange an EO sponsored fitting or at least assistance for you. $150 is a bit rich..... but what do you get for that? If its the battery protector as well as fusing wire and the fitted off socket it may be a reasonable deal.
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Reply By: jodie0075 - Tuesday, Apr 15, 2008 at 07:57

Tuesday, Apr 15, 2008 at 07:57
Thanks everyone for your input and help. I was able to wire it up over the weekend, making sure all the bases were covered. Thanks again :)
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