Argghhh - Another Next G Phone Question (Service)

Submitted: Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 08:58
ThreadID: 56686 Views:2591 Replies:8 FollowUps:13
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G'day all,

I upgraded to Next G the other day with the "T" company. No complaints regarding coverage around here - BUT - we headed off to go camping along the Freestone Creek Road for the night with friends. Only minimal coverage on and off with the Next G phones.

A friend with us has an Optus Next G phone and she had a full strength signal all the time!

Can anyone explain this? I thought all carriers used Telstra towers/equipment. How can this be so????


Tim
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (SA) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:06

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:06
Hi Tim
Optus do not and will not have access to the Telstra Next G network .
It will still be using the CDMA network for the next 12 days and then check phone reception, the Optus will be Nil.

Cheers

Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - Tim - Stratford (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:21

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:21
Stephen,

Thanks for your reply. So at the end of the month the only way to make a mobile call with Optus is to have the 'old' GSM phone?

I was sure our friend had an Optus Next G phone - it was a brand new one - but I may have been mistaken - could be the old digital (GSM).


Tim
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (SA) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 13:13

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 13:13
Hi Tim
I have asked this question to our local Telstra Rep in the fast and her response was that this was a very often asked question to her. She said that Telstra have spent many millions of Dollars on the NextG network for Telstra Customer only at this stage. She said that in the distant future, (she thought not less than 18 months) Telstra MAY consider renting the use to other carriers, but this would come down to Telstra Officials.

I do not work for Telstra, but I can see their side on things, why should they spent all that money and technology for the benefit of other carriers, so after the 28th April, the other carriers will only be able to offer GMS phone coverage to their customers. GSM may be OK in the bigger area, but last year while over on the West Coast of SA, GSM was dead, while I had full coverage with CDMA. There will be a lot of people cry foul, but they have had long enough to change over to NextG.

See what happens in the next couple of weeks.

Cheers

Stephen
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Follow Up By: obee - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 17:41

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 17:41
To carry the argument a little further, why shouldn't Telstra be allowed to charge as much as they like for the Next G service? It is a monopoly after all.

The government who allowed the copper to be sold to telstra should be banned for the next twenty years. What am I saying? They will be.

LOL

Owen
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 23:35

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 23:35
That Optus phone is possibly a 3G model.

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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 23:23

Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 23:23
"why shouldn't Telstra be allowed to charge as much as they like for the Next G service? It is a monopoly after all."

- what ????? Telstra hasn't had a monopoly in Mobile Networks for decades !
.
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 23:26

Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 23:26
When Telstra was part-owned by the Government, they had an obligation to provide a level of community service.

The government should not be surprised that a fully privatised company will use it's investments to maximise profits for it's shareholders - that's the way every other private company working a competitive environment operates.
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:25

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:25
Hi Tim

Towers are not fully shared.

Optus have 3g phones but next-g is a Telstra only system.

I have several times monitored phone signals driving north to Talbotville from princess highway and both Optus and Telstra would cut out more or less at the same time , depends a bit on phone, if its handheld in the car and who has got best view in the direction of tower, and wether that view is thru a tinted window.

Telstra worked best though when that emergency tower was in place over the fire period.

You can get a next g phone like 6120 and have 2 sim cards
Optus to save money , and Telstra when extra range is required, if its available (sometimes optus is stronger)

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Reply By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:50

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 09:50
yep optus can in some areas outperform next G.
Was sitting in the Brookton pub and noticed there was reception but not telstra (indicated by jst an arial) so i did a network search and it only came up with optus.
Im guessing you have an LG phone
I often have straight gsm phones outperform my Next G LG.
Most recently was driving into an underground carpark which killedmy next g phone dead whereas my mate alongside me with GSM kept yacking
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 10:54

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 10:54
Tim,

The quality of the mobile handset itself will have a marked impact on how good reception is.

Have read on several threads herein, how some phones were so useless they were eventually replaced by Telstra for another brand/model.

I would also expect the Next-G network to improve after the CDMA one is killed off as Telstra will supposedly be able to increase the power level of their transmission equipment.
Only time will tell how much improvement is gained.

CDMA is dead.

Next-G is the new technology and will improve as time goes by.
There will always be "black spots" where reception is poor and it will then be up to the carrier whether they can justify installing additional transmission towers in the area(s) concerned.

Bill


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Reply By: MPS - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 14:18

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 14:18
Tim,

I assume you must have been camping near the base of Mt Moornappa? Optus have a 3G base there and their antennas are lower down the tower than the Telstra ones (tower top) which may account for better Optus coverage in the Freestone creek area
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Follow Up By: Member - Tim - Stratford (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 14:43

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 14:43
MPS,

You're right - we were only 10kms past Blue Pool at a campsite called Shady's Place - great sport for a few tents - and close to home.

Thanks for your reply.


Tim
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Reply By: Member - Tim - Stratford (VIC) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 14:45

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 14:45
Thanks to all for your replies - I have since found out it was a 3G/Next G phone with Optus - so only running as a GSM/3G.

SWMBO and I our now running Next G with "T" and have witnessed good coverage in the township of Dargo - Plus around here it is faultless - but does drop to 2.5G every now and again.



Tim
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Reply By: Holden4th - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 18:24

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 18:24
Everyone is talking about Telstra as if it's a private company - it's not - we own it despite the efforts of the previous govt to sell it off. So therefore those cables, towers, repeaters etc belong to the Australian Govt and therefore the people of Australia. So why shouldn't the Govt make it available to other providers so that Aussies can get a decent service? Just to remind everybody that Telstra is a contraction of Telecom Australia! I hope the Rudd Govt march into Telstra and take over.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 20:10

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 20:10
What planet do you live on?
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Follow Up By: Holden4th - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 21:23

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 21:23
A planet that has a small continent that has a very poor telecommunications infrastructure.
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Follow Up By: lifeisgood - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 21:43

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 21:43
That would be a LARGE continent with pretty good infrastructure considering the thin spread of population beyond the cities and towns. Telstra is owned by its shareholders , they bought it from the government for billions of dollars. A large parcel of shares is held by superannuation funds for public serviants (Futures Fund). So yes it is a private company though the previous govt. has made it difficult at times to operate on a truly commercial basis.
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Follow Up By: Member - John (Vic) - Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 21:54

Wednesday, Apr 16, 2008 at 21:54
Lifeisgood to someone from another planet that explanation makes to much sense. :-)
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Reply By: BrianR - Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 22:07

Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 22:07
There is a lot of confusion regarding 3G and Next-G and many people think they are different systems. They are not. The main difference is the frequency band they operate on. Telstra use the 850MHz band while all the other networks use the 2100MHz band. 850MHz is supposed to give better penetration of obstacles and I think allows the re-use of CDMA equipment.

Next-G is a 3G system on the 850MHz frequency band and to get rural area coverage you also need a Blue Tick qualified handset and an external antenna. A lot of inappropriate handsets were sold early in the rollout of Next-G.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (Yalgoo) - Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 22:39

Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 22:39
Actually the next G frequency has far worse obstacle penatration . My phone is currently set to GSM so it an be used in side. ther day both my mate and i were talking on our phones as he drove into an UG carpark. He kept yacking on full reception(GSM) where i was cut off dead (850mz).
and inaproprate hansets are still being sold . My missus is on her 4th with the latest dieing last week after just lasting 1 week
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Follow Up By: Member - Mike DID - Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 23:32

Thursday, May 01, 2008 at 23:32
Next G (850MHz) is optimised for rural and remote areas.

In urban areas Telstra has access to the 3G network which uses 2100MHz - which has better prnetration into buildings.

Though it's pointless trying to compare networks / frequencies based on one or two example.
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