Embarrassing Fuel Question ?

Submitted: Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 14:32
ThreadID: 57631 Views:5004 Replies:12 FollowUps:4
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Well, maybe not. I'm sure many others have had this problem before !

I went on a trip about 9 months ago.

Deisel Vehicle & took a boat. Filled up jerry cans of extra Deisel, Unleaded, and unleaded with 2-stroke oil added for the outboard.

Needless to say, I didn't use it all.

Now the question. Of course I didn't label any of the Jerry cans, so, Is there an easy method of identifying which fuel is in what J/Can ??

I guess that firstly I would pour a small quantity of each into clear glass jars. What would I then need to look for?

At todays prices, I am loath to just throw away 60 lt of fuel, not to meantion the environmental issue with doing this.

Help !
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Reply By: deserter - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 14:40

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 14:40
Does the diesel smell different ? I only ask cause I smell the difference when I fill up at the servo ?
AnswerID: 303927

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 14:59

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 14:59
You should be able to tell the difference between diesel and petrol by smell alone.

If in doubt, place a small quantity in a bowl, or even on the ground and touch a flame to it.
The petrol will go whoosh!
The diesel probably won't ignite at all. It's much less flammable.

As far as the petrol and two stroke mixture are concerned, you may be able to detect an oiliness in the two stroke fuel when rubbed between thumb and forefinger. Also straight petrol should have a reddish tinge to it when viewed in a glass jar.
The two stroke mixture will probably have more of a greenish tinge, but this may depend on the two stroke oil used and at what concentration.

Bill.
Bill


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AnswerID: 303931

Follow Up By: Scorcher - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 15:38

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 15:38
Thanks Sandman.

I just checked a sample of each.

2 of the samples were a mid to dark green. Both went "whoosh" when I set fire to them, thus definately Unleaded. Both also had an "oily" feel to them.

I then compared them to the fuel in the outboard fuel tank. It was a bluey colour.

I guess that they all must be 2-stroke, with the different 2-stroke oils used being the difference.

Scorcher
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FollowupID: 570028

Reply By: Member - barry F (NSW) - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 15:35

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 15:35
Should be easy to sort the diesel out by one of the methods above. As to the petrol, I dont think a bit of 2 stroke fuel in your vehicle will do it any harm. Just add a bit now & then maybe.
AnswerID: 303936

Reply By: brushmarx - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:02

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:02
You could just put a small ammount of both fuels in open containers, and leave them in the sun to evaporate.
The oil mix should leave a residue behind.
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AnswerID: 303944

Reply By: Member - Borgy.. (SA) - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:12

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:12
G'day Scorcher

Some may disagree, but if the 2 stroke is 9mths old i personally wouldn't be using it in my outboard, after a certain amount of time the oil tends to break down and you could end up doing damage to your motor.....I would use it in my car ,I have done this plenty of times and it doesn't seem to do any harm..As for the diesel you should be able to tell the difference with that.

Cheers.....Dave

AnswerID: 303946

Reply By: Neil & Pauline - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:13

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:13
My method of determining 2 stroke fuel is to pour onto a surface (I use concrete) and you will be able to tell if an oily surface is left when evaporated. It is a regular check on the farm with employees. Haven't blown up a chain saw yet.

Neil
AnswerID: 303948

Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:19

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:19
Most 2 stroke oils have got a dye in them.
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FollowupID: 570035

Reply By: Scorcher - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:13

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 16:13
Thanks All,

I'll try the ideas out.

Scorcher
AnswerID: 303949

Follow Up By: Member - Kim M (VIC) - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 18:04

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 18:04
Scorcher

All you have to do is go down to Bunnings and get some self adhesive stickers and put them on the cans:

D= Deisal
U=UPL
2S=Two stroke

I do the same with water:

B=Bore water
F=Fresh water

Regards

Kim
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FollowupID: 570058

Reply By: Holden4th - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 19:34

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 19:34
This is so easy. There are separate container types for both petrol and diesel as the size of the diesel nozzles at the bowser are larger and won't fit into a container designed for petrol. The diesel ones are yellow and the petrol either red or black.

Now if you're like me and only took the black containers on a trip (to Perth and back) you'll know how hard they are to fill with diesel. You can't avoid spillage and diesel being as greasy as it is it collects on the side of the container and stays there. Petrol will just evaporate and the sides will left dry.
AnswerID: 303983

Reply By: DesF - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 19:37

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 19:37
Hi, to test the straight petrol from the premixed petrol,
put some in a glass with 1/2 water , stir well and let settle and the premix will settle with an oily film between the 2, if just bubbly it is straight petrol.
Cheers Des.
AnswerID: 303984

Follow Up By: Scorcher - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 20:04

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 20:04
Thanks Des,

I'll give that one a try !

Regards
Scorcher
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FollowupID: 570069

Reply By: Ronnie - Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 21:21

Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 21:21
get some strips of brown paper and dip into fuel ,the two stoke will leave oily film and the plain petrol will dry clear.
Ronnie
AnswerID: 304013

Reply By: Ozboc - Friday, May 16, 2008 at 08:21

Friday, May 16, 2008 at 08:21
Diesel is easy - its oily and does not burn fast


as for the Petrol - depending on the ratio you mixed up

put a sample of each into a bottle ( like an old coke bottle )


Shake vigorously

The one with NO 2 stroke oil will not have bubbles for very long on the surface - maybe 1 sec

the one with 2 stroke fuel will have bubbles that dissipate from the surface much slower than the plain fuel

Most fuel mixed up at 20:1 the bubbles will take about 4 seconds to disappear - you can also use this method to check to see if you have used enough oil / mix - i had worked for Mc culloch for about 3 years as my first job fixing small 2 stroke motors - and was taught this method when determining warranty on seized motors

Boc

AnswerID: 304075

Reply By: Member - andrew B (Kununurra) - Friday, May 16, 2008 at 08:53

Friday, May 16, 2008 at 08:53
It should be easy to tell the diesel from the petrol(s), and it should be ok to use. However, unleaded goes off very quickly these days and I wold only use it very diluted or is old technology/relatively cheap equipment (like a lawnmower)

If you se large quantities in the boat, it may be ok to use diluted quite a bit, but the petrol would probably have lost a lot of its octane rating.

Cheers Andrew
AnswerID: 304082

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