Never smile at a crocodile.

Submitted: Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:11
ThreadID: 65178 Views:5482 Replies:9 FollowUps:14
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I have lived most of my life in the southern states but are heading around oz soon. Might sound silly, but are there any maps or guides of where we have to look out for crocs. Eg, how far up oz, how far inland, do they venture far from water, signage etc.
Thanks
Wato35
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Reply By: Willem - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:19

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:19
Anywhere north of Rockhampton in Queensland or north of Port Hedfland in WA
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Follow Up By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:26

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:26
Willem,

We have a resident Salty in the Boyne river at Benaraby (15kms south of Calliope) and we are over 100kms south of Rockhampton LOL

Cheers Kev
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Follow Up By: Member - Tour Boy- Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:35

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:35
There have been sightings in Baffle Creek just b4 Christmas too.
That's probably 80 south of the Boyne River
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Dave
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Follow Up By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:08

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:08
I think I saw one at Aust Zoo as well hahahaha






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Follow Up By: Member - Tour Boy- Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:10

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:10
Nah that's just the toothy grin from their bank manager
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Dave
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Follow Up By: new boy - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:48

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:48
Been several sightings at Cape Lambert ( Karratha) 250 K's south of Port Hedland
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Follow Up By: Willem - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 17:59

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 17:59
Yeah, yeah........I know, a bit like the ole Cane Toad. Gets around, it does. Need warm waters to survive. Unlikely to find it in the deep south though. I spent half a lifetime in croc country...be very wary of them!!!!!!


Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Paul C (WA) - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 18:51

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 18:51
New Boy
I know they were spotted at Point Samson and Dampier not long before Christmas. Bit of a worry at Cape Lambert!
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Follow Up By: Hairy (NT) - Saturday, Jan 17, 2009 at 11:03

Saturday, Jan 17, 2009 at 11:03
And North of Katherine....Yeah yeah , they come down lower but not often.
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Follow Up By: Flywest - Saturday, Jan 17, 2009 at 14:13

Saturday, Jan 17, 2009 at 14:13
Heres a pic of a crock slide in the Pilbara at Balla Balla between Pt Samson & Port Headland (Whim Creek)



A google earth shot of the spot!



You have to assume that ANY of the creeks in the Pilbara from Onslo north have crocks - simple as that!

Cheers

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Follow Up By: Willem - Saturday, Jan 17, 2009 at 14:34

Saturday, Jan 17, 2009 at 14:34
Crock Pot or Crocodile? :-)


Seems like they are moving south. Must be Global Warming of the currents. Maybe nice tasty feeds along the coast. Maybe the crocodiles are becoming acclimatised to cooler waters. Wonder how long before thy get taken off the endangered specie list again.


Cheers
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Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 08:40

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 08:40
G'day Willem,

"Wonder how long before thy get taken off the endangered specie list again"

When they start eating people in the Brisbane River!

Kind regards
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 08:55

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 08:55
Beatit ,the bull sharks would get you long before a croc in the event of taking a dip in the sewer that is called the Brisbane river.lol.
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Follow Up By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 08:58

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 08:58
Hey Axle,

It's getting cleaner and more croc friendly! They are catching (with regular monotony) meter + king salmon and when they start catching barra it will be only a matter of time for a croc to show hahahaha.

Kind regards
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Follow Up By: Axel [ the real one ] - Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 09:46

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 09:46
Beatit , I know about the fish and how clean the river is getting [lived at brighton for 20+ yrs since start of this mth ] but swim in it ? never ,, have seen sharks upstream as far as colleges crossing.
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Reply By: Steve63 - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:34

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 15:34
Can be several hundred km inland and several hundred km out to sea. They do venture away from water but usually when moving from one water source to another. They are opitumistic ambush hunters.

Lots of places are sign posted. Clear areas are also often marked. No sign does not mean no croc's. Maps are rapidly out of date so I would not trust them. Some signs are weird ie "camp above the track" at cape Melville. Croc's obviously don't cross tracks!

You need to be croc aware not paronoid.

One NT solution was to chuck the dog in the water and shoot anything that moved towards it. Bit hard on the dog!

Steve
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Reply By: MEMBER - Darian (SA) - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:07

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:07
My attitude was much the same when I went to north QLD for the first time in 07 - we southerners know bugger all about such risks. All I can say is I'm glad that I'm very wary of those lizards - with a bloke taken in 08 in the precise spot that I was encouraged to consider croc-safe, I'll take no notice of people who claim to know where the crocs do and don't lurk. Enjoy the trip - I'll be back there - but just stay back from the water's edge !
AnswerID: 344647

Reply By: get outmore - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:23

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 16:23
there are conflicting areas too like there are plenty of places to swim in kakadu such as gunlom falls but officially you are told the only safe swimming spot in kakadu is the pool at jabaru

katherine river is considered safe but they pull salties out of there every year

i went to the Flora river because it is advertised as an excellent canoe spot - when i got there it was covered with sighns sporting massive hungry looking crocs.

many spots there are natural barriers to salties so they set traps to catch the ones that sneak in during the wet
- these spots are considered sort of safe - such as the waterfalls in litchfeild
AnswerID: 344651

Reply By: Member - Malcolm (Townsville) - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 17:08

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 17:08
Bohle River at Townsville must be pretty safe. Last year I saw a bloke with a canoe on the side of the river bank doing some fishing.

He just gave me a blank stare after I told him there are BIG lizards in this river system as I went past in my 6m boat.

Malcolm
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AnswerID: 344657

Reply By: wendys - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 18:29

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 18:29
One rough rule of thumb to keep in mind is - if there's barra in there, could also be crocs.
How far inland depends on the nature of the stream systems - a big, wide river with no, or few, barriers like big falls, can be croccy a long way inland e.g 100 km plus.
They can venture quite a way from water, but generally only if there is an incentive, like food if getting really hungry.Or when trying to find a new territory, which is why they tend to go upstream or wherever in the Wet/floods. I've known a lagoon based croc come a couple of hundred metres from the water, to eat a litter of pups - early Dry season in Kakadu area.
There are some common sense precautions to take - do not camp right on water's edge if you suspect crocs. Dogs attract them. Do not leave anything "fishy" around your camp. Do not follow the same routines in one camp - like going to the same place, at the same time, each day, for water. A big campfire will deter crocs - but you have to keep waking up at night to stoke it!
AnswerID: 344672

Reply By: On Patrol & TONI - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 20:22

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 20:22
wato35

Croc Wise

Wendy and others have said most things that are true. The above link verifies all that has been said and more.
Cheers Colin

Let Google be your friend.
AnswerID: 344691

Reply By: Kumunara (NT) - Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 23:05

Friday, Jan 16, 2009 at 23:05
Wato35


You will enjoy the top end but like everything respect the crocs.

A saltie when it attacks travels one and a half times its body length in .47 seconds. The average human reaction time is 1.7 seconds.

If you see a sign warning of crocs do not swim there.

There are salt water crocs trapped in the Katherine River at the end of each wet season - the hot springs is a safe place to swim.

Donkey camp (Katherine River) is a good fishing spot but there are salties there.

At the moment it is the best time of the year - best weather - best scenery - best fishing and no tourists to spoil it.

Went to Darwin and back yesterday and didn't spot one caravan.



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Reply By: Member - Tour Boy- Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 09:33

Monday, Jan 19, 2009 at 09:33
1964 a 3.3m croc was shot in the Mary River near Tiaro.

I have heard that a 5m croc was shot in the Brisbane river in 1911 but can't find that one on the www
Cheers,
Dave
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