Jerry Cans

Submitted: Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:05
ThreadID: 65710 Views:3809 Replies:15 FollowUps:13
This Thread has been Archived
A couple of questions for those who've been there and done that (no doubt some more questions to come too)

Our first big trip is coming up and want to know whether its better to carry extra diesel in either metal or plastic jerry cans. Fuel capacity on the car isn't huge and its more of a "In case off!! The jerrys would be fairly exposed to rocks and gravel being thrown up from the tyres. Speaking of tyres, my spare is mounted on the swing out door, how do the mounts hold up to rough roads and corrugations?.

Pretty basic q's I know but gotta ask someone.

Cheers
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Shaker - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:09

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:09
Might make it easier if you tell us what make/model of vehicle.

Personally, I prefer steel ex army Jerry cans, or Pro-Quip if you can't get good ex military ones.
AnswerID: 347597

Reply By: Willem - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:16

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:16
Sevro

My preference is steel jerrycans. I carry 12 in the trailer, lying on their sides under a false floor. Gives me a good range out in the never never.

Spare tyres fitted to doors are designed to take the stresses. Drop your tyre pressures when on gravel roads and you will sail over the corrugations.


Cheers
AnswerID: 347602

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:20

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:20
Some Nissan vehicles crack the rear doors due to the stresses from the spare wheel.
0
FollowupID: 615792

Follow Up By: Willem - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 07:54

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 07:54
Most likely due to stresses caused by larger diameter wheels such as 285's+
0
FollowupID: 615802

Follow Up By: Member - George (WA) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 15:08

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 15:08
Willem, 12 jerry cans in the trailer, that is around 250kg before anything else is loaded in the trailer. Must be a decent trailer. Cheers
Just Do It
VKS-737, Mobile 2131
Radio Operator

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Classifieds: BOAT OR CARAVAN PARKING HITCH

0
FollowupID: 615885

Follow Up By: Willem - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 15:28

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 15:28
George

Yep. Its a 7x4 Modern Trailer, built in Adelaide. Chequerplated with a springover and 7.50x16 wheels. Home made canopy. Weight is around 1000kg loaded.

250lts diesel. 120lts water, spare wheel, tucker and camping gear.

Trailer has clocked up around 45000km so far, some of it over endless spinifex.


Cheers
0
FollowupID: 615888

Follow Up By: Seakarvan - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 19:05

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 19:05
Jerry Cans are affordable and are a cheap compromise but eventually factory dual tanks will make more and more sense as time rolls by. Safer and more space friendly.

Mate if Jerry's will get you out of trouble now go steel and remember to calculate how much fuel you actually need plus a safety factor and keep topping up the tank were fuel should be in the first place. Seen blokes overdo the number of tins without considering weight and safety.

The old yank Jerry's were brilliant with a screw in cap. Hard to find though and all the current crop are Chinese.

And keep Jerry's off the rear door and roof rack if this is the case.

Cheers

Seakarvan
0
FollowupID: 615922

Reply By: Member - Smiley Bill - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:23

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:23
Hi Sevro,

Steel cans would be better for two reasons i can think of:-

Practicality - more robust to stand up to the pounding they may get, and,

Safety - fuel flowing through a pipe to fill your jerry can creates Static electricity. When filling make sure the nozzle is touching the neck of the can (which is standing on the ground), this ensures the static will flow to earth, not "jump" the gap with possible dire consequences with all the fuel fumes about.

It's for this reason s/stations don't allow plastic containers to be filled. There are suitable plastic jerry cans available (made of appropriate plastic which conducts electricity properly) but refer back to my first reason.

Not much experience with door mounted spares sorry, i have always put mine in the back of the vehicle or trailer.

Safe travels. SB
AnswerID: 347603

Reply By: Sevro - Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:30

Wednesday, Feb 04, 2009 at 23:30
Sorry guys, I've got a 05 Diesel Paji, would love to put in long range tanks, suspension upgrade, draw system etc etc but to be honest the wife and the three kids are in it more than me and I cant justify spending all my hard earned dollars on stuff I may not need.

The trip is from Townsville to the red center via Boulia and the Plenty highway in June so should be good by then.

Any ideas or recommendations are appreciated.

Thanx again
AnswerID: 347605

Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 08:51

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 08:51
Seeing as you're obviously towing a camper, at the very least I'd put a set of raised heavy duty springs under the rear. Otherwise the back end will sag too much. Only cost about $200 if you fit them yourself.

Lots of good advice to be had from the Pajero Club forum.
0
FollowupID: 615806

Follow Up By: A J - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 09:28

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 09:28
Sevro - On the Plenty Highway the largest distance between fuel stops is Boulia to Jervious Station - 468 kms. At Jervious you can purchase fuel. - Boulia to Gem Tree is 676 kms. If the vehicle has a fair range it may only be necessary to carry one jerry as reserve and good army plastics as just as strong as steel. I travel with steel but my mate travels with plastic - both work fine.


A J
0
FollowupID: 615823

Follow Up By: takenbyaliens (QLD member) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 11:33

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 11:33
Have to agree with Joh ( Mr Bitchi ). You will obviously be fairly loaded and unless you are tenting you will be pulling a camper/van. Pajs sag in the bum and an upgrade would be advisable. Also remember that if you have a roof rack, Pajs are only rated to 100kg. Effectively that means that if you travel any rough roads you can safely carry about 2/3 of that weight = 66kg. A jerry can of diesel on the roof will weigh 17-18 kg ( density of diesel is .85kg/L ) so that takes a chunk out of your possible weight.
According to modern astronomers, space is finite..a very comforting thought particularly for people who can never remember where they left things

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 615844

Follow Up By: takenbyaliens (QLD member) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 11:33

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 11:33
Sorry John not Joh...now that's almost an insult!
According to modern astronomers, space is finite..a very comforting thought particularly for people who can never remember where they left things

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 615845

Reply By: The Rambler( W.A.) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 00:00

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 00:00
Just a couple points to add
1) yes steel gerrycans as mentioned but make sure the rubber seal is sealing properly (tip upside down to test).Spare seals are available at camping shops.
2) plastic jerrycans are lighter to carry but have a horrible habit of swelling up when exposed to the sun.
Bush camp

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 347611

Reply By: Member - Mfewster(SA) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 07:23

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 07:23
If you are carrying diesel, fuel flash dangers re hugely reduced. One of the best reasons for going diesel if you need to carry jerries. A really good tip. Get an old BIG tractor or truck tube. Cut it to the length of the body of the jerry and just pull it over (like a condom. Remember?) It should fit with just a little bit of stretch. This will stop the cans rubbing against each other, rattling, rubbing against fittings etc. and reduce expansion of plastic cans.
AnswerID: 347619

Reply By: Member - Norm C (QLD) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 08:27

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 08:27
I've used both metal and plastic Jerry cans. Both have advantages and disadvantages.

I now use plastic exclusively (the black fuel safe ones). Some of them are 4 years old and have always been carried on the draw bar of CT or caravan and have covered a lot of gravel roads. I have never had one fail.

In my experience, both types are fine. For an initial one off trip, you might appreciate the cheaper price of the plastic ones.

Have fun with the planning and the trip.

Norm C
AnswerID: 347626

Reply By: austastar - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 09:16

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 09:16
Can't you borrow some? Mine have done many miles round Oz in friends' vehicles.
cheers
AnswerID: 347634

Reply By: x - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 09:17

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 09:17
Sevro

I would have thought the range of the Pajero would be enough for the intended trip without carrying extra fuel. I am guessing you'd get at least 600 km even when towing?

Diesel is freely available at regular intervals all along your route, so unless you intend driving through the night (when outlets are closed) you won't need the jerries. I'd carry an extra spare wheel instead. You are more likely to run out of rubber than diesel.

However, if you do, the black plastic ones are fine.

Bob
AnswerID: 347635

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 11:18

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 11:18
Servo, I have been using black plastic Rheem jerries for 15 years, and I still use the original ones that I bought back then.
No leaks, no rust, no rubbing through, no problem.
The latest version with 2 identical sized fillers are the best by far.

I would not have another steel one if it was free.
But that is just my opinion!

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome

AnswerID: 347651

Reply By: Olsen's 4WD Tours and Training - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 12:06

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 12:06
I can tell you that in my experience, no modern steel Jerry can will survive the Australian outback for as long as even a cheap plastic one. Having said that, be sure to buy good quality ones with a good seal in the lid, these typically have a larger opening. Sealing is the only issue you will have with cheap plastic ones.

The metal ones crack very rapidly from expansion and contraction, as they are much thinner and weaker than the old army style jerry cans. My plastic Jerry cans are more than 5 years old. I have 8 of them and they are all still going strong. I had two metal ones and they died on their first trip.

David
AnswerID: 347663

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 14:46

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 14:46
Been my experience to David, even though I use petrol which puts more vapour pressure strain on the jerries.

The plastic ones are also lighter and hold more don't clang about , and if by chance they are stored badly and develop a rub then there is several mm of plastic to rub through and usually its spotted in time.

The plastic ones I used (supercheap) have only one inlet via the screw cap and they just leak less.

Only potential weakness is making sure screw cap is made correct (I trimmed plastic dags off the thread on mine which made them work smoother).

I usually only take two inside the car and as soon as empty (1st day!) they get transferred to a bag we made that sits across the external spare wheel carrier and gets them out of the car early.

Very effective !



Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 615880

Reply By: Member - Axle - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 14:27

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 14:27
Hi Servo, A thing to think about as well with steel versus plastic is the condensation factor with steel fuel cans , you would be amazed at how much water can build up if they are not used regulary, and with a later model diese,l its one thing you don't want in your fuel , believe me!!.


Cheers Axle.
AnswerID: 347679

Follow Up By: Willem - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 16:37

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 16:37
Yerrr Axle...yerrrr...so what's some condensation between friends...our old jalopies can handle it....hahahahahaha

Cheers
0
FollowupID: 615896

Follow Up By: Member - Axle - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 16:47

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 16:47
Dead right Willem!...lol, But mate!!, some of this very late model stuff is playing up with even the little bit of condensation that occurs in the steel fuel lines!. Thats why i like V8 petrols mate, trouble free, odd knock now and then, who cares!!,hahahaha.

Cheers Axle.
0
FollowupID: 615898

Reply By: Crackles - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 16:57

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 16:57
Black Rheem jerrys for me. Either way put some protection around them to stop stone damage.
Cheers Craig............
AnswerID: 347697

Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 18:18

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 18:18
I am about to buy another five steel Pro Quip Jerrycans and a Tanami Pump to suit.
I have three jerries that I bought in the late sixties. Although i have replaced the seals they are still as serviceable as when they were purchased.
Reading this thread prompted me to contact Pro Quip the manufacturer of steel Jerry cans.
This firm has sold over 25 million jerrycans all over the world. Quote: "We produce metal cans for NATO, US, French, Thai, Malaysian, and Australian Military Forces.
The testing procedure is far more rigorous than that of the plastic ones.
Plastic safety rating is for only five years.
I think I will go for steel.
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
VKS 737 mobile 0049 selcall 0049

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 347709

Reply By: Member - Scrubcat (VIC) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 19:05

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 19:05
G`day Servo,
Expensive but probably the best would be the Stainless Steel jerry can available from 4wd outlets , ARB , TJM ,etc.

I use ex-army steel , they are better quality than the new cheaper ones.

Also some plastic brands won`t fit the jerry holders.

Cheers,

Scrubby
I don`t know where i`m going but i`m enjoying the journey.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 347716

Follow Up By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 20:40

Thursday, Feb 05, 2009 at 20:40
How ya goin Scrubby ?
We met in the Simpson under the Lone gum. As I recall there was a Koala bear up in the tree.
All the best
Stan and Chris
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
VKS 737 mobile 0049 selcall 0049

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 615932

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)