Humvee H1- any good?

Submitted: Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 14:54
ThreadID: 66071 Views:3659 Replies:5 FollowUps:11
This Thread has been Archived
Hi guys,
can anyone comment on whether the Humvee H1 is a tough and suitable truck for trips in the outback and around oz.
I saw one of these at the Wandin 4x4 show last year and the chassis, suspension and runnung gear looked asthough it was out of a Kenworth.
I would think a big cummins engine in one of these would be great...
any thoughts would be good.

Thanks
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: garrycol - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 15:15

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 15:15
Nah - they are crap off-road and haven't got what it takes - they are all show and their their piddly little 6+litre diesel wouldn't pull the skin off custard.

That is why they are still the mainstay of US military vehicles after countless wars.

Garry
AnswerID: 349657

Reply By: Ozhumvee - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 15:27

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 15:27
The Humvee and the H1 are actualy two different vehicles which share some components.
A Humvee is a military vehicle which was first produced in 1985 and is still in current production albeit it in a upgraded form.
They have 24 volt electrics, 6.2l chev V8 diesel and a turbo 400 trans with a top speed of 95k and are revving pretty hard at that speed as the military has a maximum speed of 80kph.
The Hummer H1 is a civilian version of the Humvee which was first built in 1992 and ceased production in 2006. They have 12v electrics, NA 6.5 chev V8 diesel or a turbo 6.5. Plus all the crap that people think they need in a 4wd like leather, fast glass etc etc. Most of the ones sold in Oz are 1996-7 models and are all around 12 y/old now and most are suffering a lack of TLC as most haven't been serviced or looked after very well.
They make a great vehicle for outback travel with plenty of carrying capacity and pretty much bulletproof running gear. Most of the grief comes from all the extra crap bolted onto the original basic vehicle.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 349659

Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 15:37

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 15:37
parts may shortly become an issue with GM's published intention to stop making Hummers.
Posted on internet today.



0
FollowupID: 617931

Follow Up By: Willem - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 16:38

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 16:38
Graham

You can still buy parts for a ModelT Ford...hehehehe
0
FollowupID: 617947

Follow Up By: Bob of KAOS - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 17:15

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 17:15
Peter

I have to admit that I would kill to own a Humvee.

What are they like on fuel?

Bob
0
FollowupID: 617963

Follow Up By: Wayne (NSW) - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 17:41

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 17:41
Bob,

Be Careful for what you wish for.

I meet Peter and his Humvee at Craigs hut. What was met to be a short stop for him turned out to be a guided tour of his vehicle. Everybody wants to know what it is like to drive one of these, including myself.

I am sure this would happen a lot.

Wayne
0
FollowupID: 617969

Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:10

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:10
Graham
GM stopped retailing civilian Hummer H1's in 2006, AM General (the actual manufacturer) stopped making them at the same time.
GM only made the H2's and 3's which are based on chevy trucks and are basically trading on the Hummer name which they bought the marketing rights to in 2003 (I think that was the correct date).
The Humvee/H1 is totally different animal, designed to follow tracked vehicles across country during an invasion ;-)) as well as support a variety of roles in warfare from basic supply carrying to a light armoured vehicle. They were never intended or designed to deal with post invasion urban warfare in Iraq.
As far as parts go there is absolutely no problem, there is a huge surplus market in the US with every part available plus AM General has a very good parts network with FREE shipping in the US on all parts. We can order parts online and have them delivered to the door here in Oz within 5 working days, try that with your normal 4wd sold here.
The actual cost of parts is very good, typical prices in $AU landed at my door for brand new parts are $35 for balljoints and tie rod ends, a full set of injectors $200 for eight, glowplugs $20 for 8, fully reco injection pump with all new internals $600, consumables like filters atc are available locally as the engine and trans are standard items fitted to chev's like Suburbans etc. A full set of six radiator/cooling system hoses is $85, set of fan belts (six) $30, A arm bushes $& each, uni joints $15 etc. Tyres cost $320 each delivered to the door and last around 80,000k.
Body panels are pretty cheap, front 1/4 panel (bit between drivers door and front wheel are $200 and can be fitted at home with epoxy and pop rivets. The whole body tub is high tensile aluminium , bonnet and doors are kevlar composite, the paint is CARC which is very hard and tough and doesn't mark easily.
Fuel economy is pretty good, on a trip typically 10 -15% more than a mates 79 turbo traytop with camper on the back.
Bob I usually get around 16l/100k on the freeway sitting on 95 -100 kph and the worst ever was on the Madigan line where it got up to 25l/100. A 3 litre grenadier Patrol on that trip with us used 21l/100 so with a fair bit more weight and more than twice the engine capacity plus I was making the track a lot of the time I can't complain especially as it rides and handles off road so much better than the typical 4wd.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 617980

Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:16

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:16
You are not wrong there Wayne, I have a printed A4 sheet which answers most of the usual questions like:
Q: It is very wide, how wide is it?
A: 30mm narrower than a 100 series is to the outside of its mirrors. Actually comparing body to body it is 200mm wider than a 100 series.


Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 617982

Reply By: D200Dug- Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:52

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:52
The only comment I have heard about them was from an Army driver who said they had problems on narrow tracks in north Australia. The tracks were made for toyotas and Landies and he found the hummer difficult to maneuver between trees because of it's size.

I was at my local mechanic a few weeks back they were changing the wheel bearings and hubs on a GM SUV I think it was a Tahoe.

Parts had cost $2,500 and they had spent over 4 hours just getting the parts off the car. He was not impressed with how it had been put together.

Not a hummer but made by the same people.



AnswerID: 349702

Follow Up By: D200Dug- Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:55

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 18:55
I should have said HUB single, they decided to leave the hub that was OK alone and just replace one. At $2,500 I am not surprised !
0
FollowupID: 617991

Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 21:05

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 21:05
That's where you are wrong, the Humvee and H1 are made by a defence contracting company called AM General, nothing whatsoever to do with GM. If anything they had their roots back in the old AMC company which spawned Chrysler and the original civilian Jeeps.
they also produced the H2 for GM who had designed it and supplied the components for AM General to build into vehicles, this came about as a condition of the sale of the Hummer name to GM.
They even bought the design of the 6.2/6.5 Chev diesel from GM and reworked it to solve a few initial design problems and have sold the engines under their own name for about 5 or 6 years now.
Here is link
http://www.amgeneral.com/

Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 618031

Follow Up By: D200Dug- Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 22:13

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 22:13
Ok no problem my mistake, So they are the same width and length as standard land cruisers and land rovers ?
0
FollowupID: 618059

Follow Up By: _gmd_pps - Thursday, Feb 19, 2009 at 01:27

Thursday, Feb 19, 2009 at 01:27
I reckon that mechanic did not have a clue and needed to say something in his defense. I do the service on my GMC 3500 Dually myself and have all the service manuals for all American cars on DVD up to the year 2008. To remove a hub and spending 4 hours .. well somebody did something wrong. I agree with the above that parts are lots cheaper for my truck also than the "common" jap car and usually are quicker from the US than from Sydney.
I was told about the problems with width and tracks and so far I had only a few tight moments but mostly it is better to run outside the track. Warren beach for example is tight in some places but got through without problems. The little bridge at the south end towards Nannup (4t max) was actually more of a problem since my outer tires were just inside the bridge with a total width of the truck at 2.50m.

have fun
gmd

0
FollowupID: 618086

Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Thursday, Feb 19, 2009 at 06:10

Thursday, Feb 19, 2009 at 06:10
D200dug see the follow up to second reply, no they are wider but not as much as you think 2160 o/all, approx 200mm wider in the body than a 100 series.
I have done quite a few trips outback and plenty locally in NSW plus plenty down into most of the Vic high country and never had a problem with width on tracks. Some of the detours around trees across the track require a second bite and some logs cut when across tracks have only a 100mm clearance but I've yet to have to trim any. With a wheel at each corner the biggest problem as any Landy 130 driver will tell you is the hairpins as the Humvee has the same 130" wheelbase. Overall length is less than a troopy.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 618093

Reply By: rumpig - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 19:29

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 19:29
got a mate who had a H1 many years ago (one of the first in oz), he managed to break a couple of axels on his and also on a desert trip to the simpson (first big trip he took in it) it ended up being towed back by a trayback cruiser due to some sort of fuel line problem (but this was mainly due to something in it's right hand drive conversion, not so much vehicles original design).
AnswerID: 349709

Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 19:53

Wednesday, Feb 18, 2009 at 19:53
Drove one (H1) in the States.
Very impressive off road capability, nice to drive.

Track width is a potential issue for tyre damage. Would not worry about the overall width. And ONLY the Yanks would have a tyre size of 16.5......MTs are good tyres, but!
Nearly bought a 2 door H1 in 2002, but bought the OKA in 2003 instead.

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 Motorhome
AnswerID: 349715

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)