Generator/Inverter

Submitted: Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 14:10
ThreadID: 66396 Views:2890 Replies:5 FollowUps:2
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How is this for a crazy idea?????? Using a cheep genny, connect an inverter to the 12v outlet. How do you think it would go?
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Reply By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 14:21

Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 14:21
Crazy alright... Why not just plug the appliance into the Gennie.
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 16:38

Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 16:38
Considering all the places you are not allowed to use a Gennie I agree with Doug




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Follow Up By: robertbruce - Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 18:42

Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 18:42
Graham H... this year you can use generators in a lot more Qld national parks than last year... even fraser ...

last year there were only two qld natioanl parks that permitted generators .. now there is about 7...., there are rules; gota have a permit, a sign and under 65decibels...
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Reply By: ross - Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 16:44

Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 16:44
I think Ray maybe thinking about a more pure 240v source of power to run something delicate.
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Reply By: Member - Mick O (VIC) - Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 18:44

Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 18:44
Ray,

the thing to remember with generators is the "inverse law of outback popularity".

Put simply, the less a gennie is in price, the more peoples resentment of you in the outback grows. Supa-cheap price equals outback gennie rage form anyone camping near you.

Cheers Mick ;-)
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Reply By: Tenpounder - Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 18:50

Sunday, Mar 01, 2009 at 18:50
Hi there. You set me wondering. But a few problems: a decent inverter is not cheap - so what capacity to buy?
Well, a small genny puts out say 600W - but you will find that the 12v output is around 8 to 10 amps - or below 100W total. So, if you buy an inverter to suit 10A output, you'll pay around $200 for a sine wave inverter, and have enough power to equal a Jack Russel's fart. (excuse the techincal language) like a small tv, or a lamp, but nowhere near, say, a jug or a heater.
But, if your 'cheep' genny could produce say 600W at 12v, that's 50 amps, that would be enough for a much bigger inverter. Even a 2000W inverter (sine wave) would set you back around $800. Add that to the price of the cheep genny, and you are back up amongst the Honda/Yamaha price again.
But you need to know if the 'cheep' genny produces 12v current that the inverter can handle (voltage stability etc.)
So, after you caused me to go digging because it was an interesting idea, I suspect you've given me a bum steer. But thanks for the challenge.
Chris (SA)
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Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Monday, Mar 02, 2009 at 13:47

Monday, Mar 02, 2009 at 13:47
"How do you think it would go?"

Rather poorly is probably the politest comment.

The 12 Volt outlets on your average generator are gnerally rated at a maximum of 8 Amps. That will give you a theoretical maximum of 96 Watts.

A 650 Watt generator has a theoretical maximum output of oddly, 650 Watts.

So, for a great deal of extra cost you are going to restrict a 650 Watt device to 96 Watts.

That's without going into a whole host of other fundamental electrical reasons as to why it's an "interesting" idea at best.

Geoff

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