LP Gas Bottle Set Up

Submitted: Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 19:22
ThreadID: 68144 Views:13077 Replies:6 FollowUps:3
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Hi
I need to get a new gas bottle 4.5 kg for a new stove set up.
There is two different valves to choose from available on the cylinders.

One has the larger female thread and appears to take a regulator and the other has the smaller male thread and no regulator, the hose comes straight off valve and straight into stove.
I currently have the second system utilizing a small 1.5 kg cylinder.

A couple of questions come to mind.

Why do some set ups require the regulator and some don't, what does the stove that requires no reg do different to the one that does??
I'm guessing it must run a restricted orifice in the hose fittings to control the gas flow??

Is either one system any better than the other??
It would appear to me that the system without the regulator is simpler and cheaper.

All info or comments are welcome.

Cheers

John


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Reply By: Holden4th - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 19:37

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 19:37
I have two 4.5 kg bottles, one with the small orifice and one with the larger one. I can run the smaller one directly into my basic Coleman stove but I have to use use an adaptor to run it into my gas Weber which has a regulator attached. The other bottle fits my Weber hose perfectly. When I run out of gas in one I change over and use the adaptor if necessary.

So it's got nothing to do with the bottle and everything to do with the appliance. The correct gas hose always comes with the appliance so whatever is on the end of that hose will determine how you connect. If I tried to run a direct gas hose to my Weber (no regulator) I don't think it would work very well. The regulator on it is designed to operate with as low a gas flow as possible for a long slow roast.

My simple Coleman stove is basically an on/off device with a minimal amount of pressure adjustment so no regulator is necessary but I could use one if I wished with no real change.
AnswerID: 361123

Reply By: Wayne (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 19:48

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 19:48
John,

From what I understand, the fitting with the regulator and large left hand thread is for a BBQ or gas ring. Gas burns at low pressure and has larger jets. The flame will be covering a large area. Where the hose fits the stove will be a screw on fitting.

The gas fittings that have right hand fittings and are smaller are used on gas stoves or lights. They have smaller jets that tend to get blocked at the most inopportune time. The gas will burn in a smaller area, make some noise and is ideal for a single small area to be heated.
Where the hose fits to the stove there should be a rubber ring as a seal to stop the gas from escaping.

Depending what type of stove you are getting will depend on what type of jets are fitted. That will have the correct fittings for the type of hose that can be fitted.

Wayne
AnswerID: 361128

Reply By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 20:03

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 20:03
Hi John,

The differing bottle connections are just that. There is no other significance.

Regulators can be used with either connection size. My stove uses the smaller connection and has a regulator. I have bottles with both connection sizes and simply use a connection adaptor.

Stoves utilising regulators do have several advantages. Because of the lowered gas pressure the stove control valves and jets have larger orifices so there is less incidence of blockage. Also the control valves are less "touchy" and able to be turned down to a low burn setting without losing the flame altogether as often happens with the full-pressure types.

Another advantage of the regulator-type stove is that they are designed to run on the lower regulated LPG pressure, so on those cold mornings when the LPG pressure is low they still burn pretty much as when the bottle is warm. A distinct advantage.

PS: Thanks for the "spare carrier" info.

Cheers
Allan

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Best Off Road - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 20:37

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 20:37
Great explanation Allan. I'm now beginning to understand the problems we have been having with our unregulated stove.

Bloody jets blocking, burners hard to adjust (they go out too often), cold weather causes problems in a long gas line etc.

Thanks so much. I'm going to fling the $50 stove and get a decent one.

Regards,

Jim.

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Reply By: greatoutdoorsdirect - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 22:37

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 22:37
Hi John,

Basically works like this:
Aus Bottles come with 3 basic thread styles, the 2 you are referring to are POL [large female thread] and a male 3/8LH fitting.

Both these these thread styles on bottles have ability to take regulators.

Regulators are basically used to reduce bottle pressure.
Use of were a reg is used differs from appliance to appliance. eg.
-most cast iron appliances require reg at bottle and low pressure hose to appliance.
-general camping stoves have jets [orifices] in them, which act as pressure reducers, so no reg is required at bottle. Regulation gets done thru jets.
-most camping bbq's req reg at bottle.
-coleman has its own reg valve, which regulates the pressure before appliance. Hence why coleman stoves are the best, they have the best regulation system, best flame burn, and never get blocked jets, like general camping stoves are so prone to.

Hope this helps

Regards
Regan.
AnswerID: 361175

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 22:41

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 22:41
Stoves that require a regulator at the gas cylinder are low pressure stoves. They do not require jets before the burner and generally have an infinite control over the burner flame from a gentle simmer to a full flame. The Coleman gas stove is an example of this type.

Stoves that do not have a regulator rely on jets before the burner to restrict the gas pressure. These are high pressure stoves, such as the Primus and Companion range of stoves. They cannot be controlled to the same extent as the low pressure stove and are very susceptible to blockage of the jets by small particles of dust, etc.

I ditched my high pressure stove after the second time it became blocked and invested in the Coleman low pressure stove. It has a small regulator in line between the gas cylinder and the burners and performs very very well indeed in all weather conditions.

Bill

Bill


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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 22:51

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 22:51
As for the gas cylinders, there are two connector sizes to my knowledge.

The 4.5 kg cylinders in my experience come with a POL type fitting, the same as the larger 9 kg bottles.

Anything smaller generally has a 3/8" fitting, either a left hand thread for the Companion brand and a 3/8" right hand thread (I think) for the Primus brand.

I can't state what the newer 4 kg cylinders fittings are.
I can still source 4.5 kg cylinders with a POL fitting and as these are available with a built-in float gauge, I have chosen this type for its extra convenience.

Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 23:52

Thursday, Apr 23, 2009 at 23:52
Actually, all gas or LPG stoves require jets preceding the burner. Their purpose is to both limit the gas flow and to create a gas velocity past the air intake port so as to induce air into the gas stream to the burner.

Those stoves operating with reduced gas pressure via a regulator have jets with larger orifices and are thus less likely to suffer from blockage. Similarly, the stove control valves operate with larger apertures and are thus easier to control.

Allan
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Reply By: Member - John (Vic) - Friday, Apr 24, 2009 at 01:27

Friday, Apr 24, 2009 at 01:27
Great info guys, thanks very much.
You have cleared up the issue very well.

Good write up Allan and Bill looks like I'm going to get a new Coleman Stove as now I know why my cheapo high pressure stove keeps giving me the $hits.

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