tyre pressure guage

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 14:46
ThreadID: 68195 Views:3166 Replies:8 FollowUps:9
This Thread has been Archived
I need to replace my digital tyre pressure guage with one that is accurate and reliable and easy to use. I'm interested to get recommendations for one that will do the job without necessarily costing an arm and a leg.

Thanks in advance,

John
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Mick15 - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 14:53

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 14:53
Jamec tyre gauge

This is what i use, mine has a 45 degree chuck though - looks identical, just the end piece is set at 45, can fit in the road bike front wheel with dual 300mm discs, cars and fourbys are easy, seems accurate too (reads the same as every other gauge i tried it against)

I think mine came from bursons.
AnswerID: 361444

Follow Up By: Roughasguts - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 16:16

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 16:16
They look good but there not real robust thats why the protective case.

Dad had one then dropped it on the driveway broke the glass and that was it stuffed.
0
FollowupID: 629198

Follow Up By: Member - Rob S (NSW) - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 17:21

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 17:21
I have had a jamec gauge for over 10 years and found to be very good and easy to read, i like the plastic case it comes with helps protect it when
rumbling around in the centre console with all the other crap.
As Roughasguts Jnr. said don't drop it.
But maybe Roughasguts Snr. is living up to his name and dropped it from a great hight. LOL.

I only ever made one mistake
and that's when I thought I was wrong!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 629207

Follow Up By: Mick15 - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 20:26

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 20:26
Yea i must say i don't tend to drop things, tend to try and treat my tools with care, I'd be heartbroken if i dropped some mitutoyo digimatic calipers on the road!
The case is a pretty positive unit however, It really isn't something i use every day, maybe if i did i'd have more chance of damaging it.
From memory the new ARB deflator/gauge has a rubber cover over the gauge, and looks pretty neat, but i think you'd have to screw it on to get a reading - a pita if you only wanted a pressure reading.
If you were rough with equipment i think you can get rubber gauge protectors - or just buy a gauge with one on it - ebay is bound to have them.
0
FollowupID: 629263

Follow Up By: Inkbandit79 - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 14:26

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 14:26
those arb ez deflators arn't acctually a gauge,its only a guide to show you how much preasure it's letting out i wouldn't trust it to check your preasure's every day, but they are great to let your tyres down as they dont have set preasure as the staun ones do, and it is a pain in the a%@e to set the staun ones
0
FollowupID: 629393

Reply By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 17:04

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 17:04
BUSHRANGER from ANACONDA they are about $40 and have a feature that if you pump up too much you just push the shaft towards the valve and it deflates it.

Easy as. comes in a little zipper bag and all.
Use it to check tyres in morning an it is within half a pound of the reading on my pressure senders .

Cheers


AnswerID: 361475

Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:22

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:22
Its a good choice Graham.

They screww on and hence take a couple of extra seconds to use but this makes the reading more reliable.

The large dial type guage with few graduations means I can read mine with glasses.
Robin Miller

Member
My Profile  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 629332

Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 18:36

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 18:36
Hii John,

I have a number of gauges from supercheap, two short stem and one stethescope type gauge, with an easy to read dial. Around the twenty dollar mark and all three are accurate to within 0.5 psi, in the range between 50 psi and 10 psi. Depending on the type of rim fitted to your vehicle, some gauges may be difficult to get onto the valve stem for an accurate reading and well worth checking out before purchase. ARB, usual disclaimer, have a gauge with an incorporated deflator that is relatively easy to use and is around the seventy dollar mark.
The difference between a good gauge and a cheap gauge when you drop it?? ....... about fifty dollars ... lol

Hope this helps,
Cheers,
Wayne.
AnswerID: 361512

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 19:49

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 19:49
I also have a digital tyre pressure gauge from Bushranger, but it must be the "base" model. It doesn't have a fancy deflation apparatus but merely does its job of measuring tyre pressure and does this very well.

I paid less than $20 for it about 6 years ago from Kmart and it is a very practical tool indeed.

You press the on button to switch it on and after it has been given a sufficient breath of life, it beeps to you that it is satisfied and displays the results to you on an easy to read display. A three second press of the on button will change the calibration from psi to bar (and Visa versa) and after a couple of minutes of non use, it will shut itself down automatically.

How accurate is it? Don't care as this is somewhat irrelevant.
Who cares if it is three psi difference than an ultra expensive gauge and even then, how do you determine which one is more correct?
Consistency of results is what you need for a practical gauge.

My old mechanical pencil type "plunger" gauge had a tendency to stick. I replaced this with a not cheap clock dial type gauge but this has sat in my compressor box as a "spare" as I couldn't read the result without the need for my reading glasses and thus the justification for a digital type gauge with an easily read display and an audible alarm.

Bill

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 361528

Reply By: Pebble - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 22:44

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 22:44
Well it does depend on what you consider an arm and a leg (probably my suggestion), I brought Hubby this Draper Gauge, it's top quality and in my opinion worth the money, it maybe have been cheaper when I got it though (can't remember). It has good precision (increments) and it holds the reading until you press a little button (so you can remove it from your tire to read if necessary). I consider it a good thing that it's not digital (won't run out of batteries) as well.

This is the place I brought it from, and was happy with their service too (over the net).

Draper Gauge from TW Performance

But on a side note I have a Topeak branded digital gauge that I keep in my car (normally use it for my mountain bikes as it does schrader and presta valves), it's not a bad gauge, only annoying thing is having to turn it off and on every time you want to do another reading! I think it was about $40.

I did look into Ebay ones that look like the Draper, but it was hard to find ones that had the same quality or the same sort of accuracy (increments and to what max psi they read - similar to when you're shopping for good scales)

Picture of the Draper...


And link to the Topeak Smart Gauge (I can highly recommend Phantom Cycles, but Deanwoods is cheaper it seems)
Topeak at Phantom Cycles

Topeap at Deanwoods



We've had both gauges for at least two years and have been happy with both, I do like the Draper better but I never get to use it because it's in Hubby's car :(
AnswerID: 361564

Follow Up By: Pebble - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 22:47

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 22:47
It should have read that I think I paid $45 for my Topeak (I actually brought it from For The Riders in Qld) and something I wanted to point out is that it may not be easy to use with certain rims etc, we had a Subaru Forester for a bit and I don't think I could easily check the tyre pressures with the Topeak on that, also kids bikes with the really small wheels can be difficult. So yeah my vote for the Draper type gauge.
0
FollowupID: 629301

Reply By: Pebble - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 22:57

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 22:57
I also agree on the accuracy comments - it's consistency one is after with gauges so comparing different ones as to how accurate they are to each other isn't much use unless you are using different gauges all the time!
As you may have noticed I merely class accuracy as showing smaller increments (like being able to read to 1psi rather than 5psi increments) and I think this is where the higher cost comes in (like with scales) if you want a gauge that will read accurately to 1psi increments but still have a large range (say 1-100psi) then I guess you end up paying more. In some ways it seems that digital gauges tend to get around that and offer the same range and increments for a much cheaper price!

When it comes down to it I think a person could be just as happy with a $20 gauge as they would as a $60 one, providing you're using the same gauge and it gives consistent readings then pressure is just relative isn't it. I suppose though if the gauge isn't well calibrated you might or might not discover that your tires (tyres !) are under / over inflated compared to what they should be, and in some ways one could argue that buying a cheap gauge could potentially cost you in the long run (premature tyre wear?). But hell you can complicate the choice of any product can't you!!!!
AnswerID: 361566

Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 23:30

Saturday, Apr 25, 2009 at 23:30
Hi (again) John,

Maybe I missed something in your original post .... that others saw.

Accurate .............. reliable ............. easy to use ......

While some consider that accuracy is NOT important, it was a stated criteria for a replacement and while three gauges of differing origin may not be a basis for a scientific approach, my reply was trying to indicate that cheaper gauges may be suitable for the requiered task.
I do agree with Bill ..... .to a point ........... that the reading on a given gauge may differ to the actual pressure of the tyre ............ consistancy is more important!

I also read that cost is important ............ Supercheap currently have these gauges at the sub twenty dollar mark ..........

Pebble did indicate that the increments on a gauge are important too ....... going to a mark on the gauge ..... without my glasses on ..................... is no problem with the gauges I have.

FWIW........... taking into account the cost of rims and tyres on current vehicles .............. twenty dollars for an accurate gauge is peanuts.

Cheers,
Wayne.






AnswerID: 361571

Reply By: Member - John and Val W (ACT) - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:06

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 08:06
Thank you everyone for your comments. I raised the question here because I've had such variable experiences with tyre pressure gauges. There's also that business of learning from your own mistakes, but it's much cheaper to learn from other people's!

I've had 2 cheap digital gauges from SuperCheap. The first one was good (i.e. consistent and I reckoned satisfactorily accurate.) So when it died (probably battery) I bought a second identical one. Inconsistent readings, needed to be rebooted between readings, a real pita. So I bought two cheap piston/cylinder types. One was obviously wrong, the other didn't hold its reading when removed from the valve.

One course of action is to simply spend more money on the assumption that the more expensive ones are better. That sort of assumption is often wrong though.

Some interesting comments regarding the distinction between resolution and and accuracy. We do tend to assume that measuring to 3 decimal places is more accurate than to 1 decimal place. Not true of course, it's just a higher resolution reading. With tyres I reckon reliability and reproduceability of measurements are more important than resolution and accuracy. Certainly resolution is a very low priority, and accuracy to within 5% is probably just fine, so long as the error is consistent.

Thank you for your interesting comments.

Cheers

John

J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 361587

Follow Up By: troopy 2005 - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 11:27

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 11:27
the arb ezi deflater is accurate,because you have a direct link to the tyre,with poly airs the volume of air is only small so any air that escapes while trying to put the gauge on and of is critical .this would also apply to bike tyres.
These meet all the criteria.buy one and try it I dont think youll be dissapointed.
0
FollowupID: 629367

Follow Up By: Member - John and Val W (ACT) - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 11:38

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 11:38
Hi Troopy,

Yes, because of the direct connection, the gauge should be seeing exactly the tyre pressure. My comments related to the accuracy of the measurement itself though. I doubt that the reading provided by any tyre pressure gauge can be relied on to be better than within 2 or 3 percent of the correct reading. That said of course, the direct connection does overcome the other source of big errors, leakage.

Cheers

John
J and V
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
- Albert Einstein

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 629373

Follow Up By: troopy 2005 - Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 12:03

Sunday, Apr 26, 2009 at 12:03
Exactly right ,as your "quote relates,its more the consistancy of the reading that counts.The lack of leakage gives you this.with this you can get exactly the same pressure in all the tyres ,even down to very low pressures.
0
FollowupID: 629381

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)