camping

Submitted: Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 18:53
ThreadID: 68763 Views:2421 Replies:12 FollowUps:10
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any ideas how to stop the cold air from coming underneath your tent and freezing your air mattress
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Reply By: Boobook2 - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 18:55

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 18:55
Get rid of your air matress, they will freeze you when they manage to stay inflated. Get a good self inflating matress or bed.
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Follow Up By: Member - Scrubcat (VIC) - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 19:21

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 19:21
Ditto

Scrubby.
I don`t know where i`m going but i`m enjoying the journey.

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Follow Up By: wild dog - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:46

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:46
Agree totally 100% and completely with Boobook2 and Scrubcat.

Air mattresses are a disaster on a cold night.

I'm going to do as suggested in an earlier thread and get a down bag and use our selfinflating mattresses.
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Follow Up By: Member - RFLundgren (WA) - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:58

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:58
As above we persevered with air mattresses for quite a while until we finally saw the light and got rid of them. They were cold, always tended to leak and were a right pain to inflate every time you got to camp.

Richard
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Richard

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Reply By: Member - Kiwi Kia - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 18:58

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 18:58
It's just as important to have a blanket under you as it is on top. Newspapers are good underneath in an emergency - ask any guy sleeping on a park bench :-))

.
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Reply By: Member - Teege (NSW) - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 19:14

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 19:14
cardboard boxes are great insulators.

Teege
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Reply By: Sigmund - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 19:46

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 19:46
You can get wide sheets of closed cell foam mat, about quarter of an inch thick, to go over (and/or) under your mattress. Clark rubber.

But the air mass in your mattress will suck heat out of your body. OK in warmer weather but a problem in cold.
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Reply By: Madfisher - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:09

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:09
I put a 1in foam mattress under the air bed, very comfy and much warmer. These are available. from BCF. I still find airbeds more comfy then the self inflating type Sal uses. I also put an old furniture removalist blanket on the floor of the tent. The gas bottles get wrapped in this on route as well
Cheers Pete
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Reply By: Mrbrush - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:41

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:41
Im thinking of buying a mattress feather filled topper to go over our air mattress for camping outback.
Reason being is that I dont want to carry bulky items
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:49

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:49
The 1cm thick high density foam that you find with the square camping mats or the "hiker's mats" is a good insulator. A couple of years back we spent a night on the Antarctic snow with nothing more than a blue foam camping mat and a sleeping bag inside a dome tent. The blue foam mat was a great insulator.

We did away with air mattresses years ago because they often have a small leak - too hard to find but enough to see you touching the ground at 3am in the morning.
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Follow Up By: Pete Jackman (SA) - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 18:01

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 18:01
Why 3 am I always ask. And why does it take 5 hours to go down the first time and then when you get up at 3 am and reinflate it you are back on the dirt an hour later!

Pete
Any mug can be uncomfortable out bush

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Reply By: dact - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:54

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 20:54
We have a tarp which goes underneath the tent(helps to keep tent clean) and then a rubber backed picnic rug under our self inflating mattress.
If its really cold, we put sleeping bag under the fitted sheet.

Hmmm didn't seem that complex til I typed it

Cheers
AnswerID: 364560

Reply By: rags - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:09

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:09
space blanket as used in hypothermic first aid ,works for me
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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:59

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:59
do you then sleep with earmuffs on?

Andrew
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Reply By: tim_c - Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:12

Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 21:12
Just go to your local camping shop (or camping section of Big W/K-Mart) and grab one of those foam camping mats (they're around $10 each). Put this ON TOP of your air mattress and your sleeping bag on top of that - they insulate very well, are very cheap, very lightweight and roll up in ~30 seconds.
AnswerID: 364568

Reply By: Member - Ian W (NSW) - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 07:36

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 07:36
I have always slept on air beds as I find them the most comfortable.

Yes! They can be very cold and then hot in summer.

My solution was a piece of thick felt as used by furniture removalists on top of the air bed to be ideal. I have a couple of pieces I use as padding when I pack gear into the back of the wagon. Also makes a very warm "eiderdown on top of the bed on zero type nights.

Ian
AnswerID: 364603

Follow Up By: Madfisher - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 10:04

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 10:04
gotta agree Ian, cannot get comfy on anything else. Mind you I have given up camping in winter, but it can still get down to zero in the high country at xmas anyway.
Cheers Pete
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Follow Up By: Member - Duncs - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 11:17

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 11:17
If you have given up camping in winter you are ripping yourself off.

All my most memorable and enjoyable trips have been in winter. If your equipment is letting you down buy better equipment. 19 years ago I spent $400 on a down sleeping bag. 19years later it is still keeping me warm on even the coldest trips. It probably has another 20years in it. So far it has cost $20 per year and it is getting cheaper all the time. To buy the same bag now would cost over a grand but if you divide that by 20years it is only $50 a year. So for the sake of $50 or less per year, you are missing out on camping at the best time of year. Add a decent mattress, one that won't act like a freezer and let you down in the middle of the night and you can probably cut back on what you spend on the sleeping bag.

Buy some decent gear and get out there. It is still way cheaper than a motel room and more comfortable than some of the cheap motels I have been unfortunate enough to stay in.

Duncs
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Follow Up By: tim_c - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 12:39

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 12:39
Hey Duncs,

What is the $20/yr for? I never knew sleeping bags needed to be "serviced"! :) Ok, it's a little O/T, but having read posts here about sleeping bags, I'm beginning to think I need to get ourselves some good down sleeping bags...
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Follow Up By: tim_c - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 12:45

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 12:45
Duh, worked it out already (sorry - do I feel silly?) - it's the cost of purchase divided by the years of use... silly me!
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Follow Up By: Madfisher - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 22:05

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 22:05
Duncs I only use to go camping in winter thirty years ago, and I have much better gear now , but that was pre aches and pains lol. November at Tantangra is the same as mid winter any where else.
I do hearwhat you are saying, and would consider going somewhere mild like Lake St Clair near singleton, if the Bass where biting.
Unfortunalty we are getting to an age where I have to cart a chair into the tent to get undressed.
Cheers Pete
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Reply By: equinox - Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 19:17

Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 19:17
Slightly off track here, but I have heated up the tent before using this simple but dangerous method..

Pour red hot embers 3/4 of the way into a metal bucket which should be stood on a heat proof surface (small plank). Top with sand (to keep smoke down). Try not to knock bucket over. Bucket will give off good heat for an hour or two.

I have used this method in the past and will surely in the future. It takes the top off the cold bite you get upon bedtime...

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.

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