What UHF Channel do you use?

Submitted: Monday, May 25, 2009 at 08:25
ThreadID: 69150 Views:5242 Replies:8 FollowUps:2
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Here are My preferences transfered from another thread.


Most over length/width load pilot vehicles transmit their presence to transport over ch 40.

I have my UHF on group scan VIZ,
Ch 40 for the trucks etc.
Ch 20 for the Motor homes.
Ch 18 for the Caravaner's.
Ch 10 the 4wd outback ch.
Ch 12 our local 4wd club.

However I often turn it to open scan when traveling the coastal highways as the trucks often use different channels..
I also flick it to open scan when nearing roadworks so that I can hear the stop n go men and get an idea what is going on.
Often hear some funny remarks.

I have identified myself when behind an over width/length set up which has helped get round them .
These are most useful when the van is attached.
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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Reply By: Robin Miller - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 09:01

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 09:01
Hi Dodger

I note your list doesn't include the most popular channel in our area of victoria , CH 15

We use this channel everywhere but keep a second handheld running in a mobile phone holder on the dash to alert us of other UHF traffic or for contacting the odd truck etc




Robin Miller

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Reply By: Hairs & Fysh (NSW) - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 09:08

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 09:08
Usually have mine set to CH 29 on the North coast of NSW around the Grafton area. And when we travel in a group its usually 20 or 21.
Yeah, you do hear some funny stuff.
The other day a few of the truckies that knew each where rabbiting on using some colourful language, when One bloke pipes up, 'hey, enough of the language, I've got my misses in the cab with me'
It went quiet for a sec, then a bloke comes back with "What, shes to ugly to kiss good bye"
That did me :))



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Follow Up By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 11:18

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 11:18
I was patiently waiting in the front of a queue at some roadworks in the Kimberly. The lollypop woman there was seated, holding the lollypop in one hand and reading a book in the other. Ch40 was the roadworks channel, so I picked up the mike and said to her "I don't want to spoil a good book, but the butler did it!" She looked up and saw three laughing faces in our wagon and grinned, meekly stating that it was study. Other workers picked up on this and remarked that she usually only read books with pictures in them, and dirty ones at that! There was quite a spirited conversation for a while. Guess it took away the boredom...
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Reply By: tim_c - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 12:39

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 12:39
Thanks for the info Dodger.

I knew the roadworkers usually used UHF (heard them a couple of times while scanning and stuck at road blocks) but I'd always just thought the motorhomers used Ch18 like the caravanners.

You might also like to check here for more info - I knew Ch5/35 were emergency only but I hadn't realised so many other channels were 'blocked out' for other uses.
AnswerID: 366606

Reply By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 12:51

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 12:51
Dodger
Good thinking re the Oversize, check out this link Helpful Information

.
still going strong with 836,179 K's

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Follow Up By: Member - Old Girl (QLD) - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 13:15

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 13:15
Hi Doug
Your link should be added to regular info on this site. Ive been in the passenger seat of wide and heavy loads and it can get hairy with people having total disregard or nil understanding of the situation. It also should be in learner driving material.
Had a terrable situation up near Ayr where we had two wide loads the pilot of the first one instructed on coming traffic to pull over around a bend from a narrow bridge. One young girl ignored the instruction and proceeded. All we could hear was the truck driver screeming out " I cant stop I cant stop" and we could see his brake lights on. Till this day we do not know how she fitted past on that bridge. Thats just one story.
Sharon
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Reply By: Member -Dodger - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 15:09

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 15:09
Here for your info are the channels as indicated on link.

UHF Channels

And thanks for that other link of which I was aware.

I knew about the flashing light indicators but can never remember them that is why I advocate a total width sign.

Thanks All
I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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Reply By: Member - Tony V (NSW) - Monday, May 25, 2009 at 15:45

Monday, May 25, 2009 at 15:45
The first post was just about spot on

The last update on UHF I saw was

Legal Channels:

5 – Emergency channel (simplex and duplex) *
35 – Reserved for emergency use, not to be used in simplex (repeater input) *
11 – Calling channel – use to make contact then change to another channel
22/23 – Telemetry and telecomm and only (voice communication is not permitted) why you get noise
1/31 – Not to be used in simplex when in range of a Channel 1 repeater *
2/32 - Not to be used in simplex when in range of a Channel 2 repeater *
3/33 - Not to be used in simplex when in range of a Channel 3 repeater *
4/34 - Not to be used in simplex when in range of a Channel 4 repeater *
6/36 - Not to be used in simplex when in range of a Channel 6 repeater *
7/37 - Not to be used in simplex when in range of a Channel 7 repeater *
8/38 - Not to be used in simplex when in range of a Channel 8 repeater *

Recommended Channels:

10 – Used by many 4WD clubs (also known as the outback channel)
12 – Recommended for use by 4WD clubs
18 – Recommended for caravanners (although it is often used by road gangs and farmers)
20 – Used by the Campervan and Motorhome Club of Australia (CMCA)
40 – Road channel – mainly used by trucks (the language can be ‘colorful’), but many 4WD'ers and caravanners monitor or use this channel when traveling on the highway.


Note that Trucks tend to use 29 from the F3 up through to Grafton way. Perth has some different channels as well/

These are the available "chat " channels 9, 13-21, 24-30, 39

It is best to avoid channels 31-38 completely unless you are sure there isn’t any corresponding repeaters in range.


* The repeater list can be found @ Repeater List or VK web site

AnswerID: 366626

Reply By: Member - BUNDY BOY (WA) - Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 21:54

Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 21:54
hi all
as far as im concerned if you are travelling on the roads or highways in our great country....use channel 40 uhf.....its the transport channel...for your family's safety and that of others...........use it as all full time road users are on this channel
if you want to group scan or whatever.great but 40UHF is were you'll get warnings .hear what's going on on the roads you are travelling on......and be aware of what's going on around you......being on the road as i am its so annoying when people are on other channels.for car to car coms...and have know idea what's going on ahead or outside there group.......................don't mean to sound grumpy but its safety for all
Bundy
AnswerID: 366879

Reply By: Super (NSW) - Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 15:22

Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 15:22
G'day all. Don't know if it's been mentioned but there is a terrific web site that has a list of all the UHF repeater channels across the country. the site is at www.tropinet.com/uhf-repeaters/search.html. Hope this helps......
Super.
Regards,
Phil

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