Landcruiser Discovery Pajero

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 11:24
ThreadID: 69907 Views:3538 Replies:12 FollowUps:15
This Thread has been Archived
At the risk of opening a can of worms I recently considered upgrading my 04 turbo 100 series to a 200 series v8 diesel but find the price to be over the top albeit I understand the advantage of re sale value etc.
I am now considering Discovery or Pajero which are 17k and 20k cheaper.
I would like to hear from people that have these vehicles in diesel form bearing in mind I am towing up to 3 tonne.

Cheers
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: tim_c - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 11:44

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 11:44
I'd keep the 100 series
AnswerID: 370483

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Jul 02, 2009 at 18:33

Thursday, Jul 02, 2009 at 18:33
Me too. 4000Kms in the Kimberley corrugations in our 2005 100 TD LC (140Kms on clock) and NOT ONE RATTLE or problem. No flats etc etc etc.

Don't change.
0
FollowupID: 640052

Reply By: Nargun51 - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 11:51

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 11:51
The Pajero only has a 2500 kg towing capacity (Braked)
AnswerID: 370486

Reply By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 12:13

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 12:13
The current Pajero (NT) is rated to tow 3 tonnes.
AnswerID: 370490

Reply By: Member - Brad S (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 12:17

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 12:17
Wait for the Disco 4 - bi-turbo.
AnswerID: 370491

Follow Up By: tim_c - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:46

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:46
When's it due out?
0
FollowupID: 637872

Follow Up By: Member - Brad S (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:51

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:51
I read somewhere November 2009ish
0
FollowupID: 637875

Follow Up By: tim_c - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 20:01

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 20:01
Ok, thanks. Sounds like a few newies/upgrades due out towards the end of the year...
The new LR Disco4
The rumoured 70-Series LC mods (airbags and new dash - first since intro in the 1980's)
And of course the Nissan Patrol TDV8 (to compete with the LC200) haa haa haa haa :)
0
FollowupID: 637877

Reply By: GimmeeIsolation - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 12:42

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 12:42
I too had the same decision to make twelve months ago with no bias. I drove the 200 series, researched the rest (although the new Pajero was not out) and then test drove the Discovery 3. I bought the Discovery TDV6SE. Take one for a drive after driving a Toyota. You will see why they continue to win the accolades as the best of the rest which really annoys the owners of the Japanese stuff. The overpriced 200 series drives like a truck and in my opinion rely on the people who say they will always buy a Toyota. I live in the Kimberley and it gets used accordingly as well as completing a trip around OZ avoiding the black stuff all with no problems at all. I go with the above reply, wait for the Discovery 4 and you will not be dissapointed.
AnswerID: 370497

Follow Up By: Tenpounder (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 13:29

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 13:29
Hi there. As a one-time Series II owner, I still have a soft spot for Landrover. But the perennial quality control questions still worry me. Have they been fixed? And are the modern electronics systems too sexy for words, or reliable enough?
I am terrified at the process of replacing my Prado when the time comes (it's 11 years old now, and over 200,000 km). Any comments?
0
FollowupID: 637825

Follow Up By: GimmeeIsolation - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 14:09

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 14:09
When Ford took over LandRover quality control was improved dramatically. I have done about 25 thousand kilometres on corrugations and have no squeeks or rattles and have not encountered the overheating of airbags as some have said even though I do not drive slow and do very long distances each day with heavy loads and temps in the mid fourties on occasions- I like going when there are less "terrorists" and I travel on my own. I put the idea of the electronics faulting in the same category as when we had points in the distributor ( as I had the first time I explored the Deserts in my "69' Holden HT wagon ) and the older generation were worried about those "new fang dangled electronic ignitions" back then in the early eighties that was coming out on the Japanese cars. How many still prefer a set of points now? Time has moved on. People have more problems with tyres/driving too fast/fatigue/inattention/little experience and poor preparation. The computer on the Discovery 3 can be "reset" by yourself from the drivers seat should any fault occur.
0
FollowupID: 637832

Follow Up By: Tenpounder (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 14:34

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 14:34
Thanks for that - food for thought, eh? Now we have to see if the Indians can maintain the Ford standard! An indestructible Defender at under $50,000 still has appeal.
0
FollowupID: 637834

Follow Up By: tim_c - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:45

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:45
Chris, your Prado should be good to cover that distance again... *IF* Prados are as good as Jackaroos ;)

I expect they are!
0
FollowupID: 637871

Reply By: png62 - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 16:57

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 16:57
I second the "keep the 100 series" - still more durable than the newer "others..!!!
AnswerID: 370528

Reply By: Member - Tom V (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 17:14

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 17:14
Corio
one of the latest 4Wd magazines has just done an comparison article on the
200, D3 & Pajero. u might want to get a copy. Cheers Tom
AnswerID: 370533

Follow Up By: Member - Corio - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 18:29

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 18:29
Tom

Thanks, I now have the magazine however still interested in what happens after a few thousand kms.

Cheers
0
FollowupID: 637858

Reply By: Tenpounder (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 17:20

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 17:20
Hi. Just had a look on the web. The Paj is indeed rated to tow 3000 kg, but only with a ball weight not exceeding 180 kg. Oddly, it is OK to put 250 kg on the ball, as long as the towed mass is between 2500 kg and 3000Kg (according to the website I saw). This tends to suggest there won't be much of a margin. Also, if you have a 3 tonne caravan, and a 2180KG Pajero, and a GCM of 6030KG, then with fuel and stuff in the back of the Paj, you would again be running out of margin if you weren't careful.
I must admit I like the 10% on the ball idea, but there's no way you can achieve that with the Paj and a 3 tonne van.
AnswerID: 370535

Reply By: Member - Corio - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 18:33

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 18:33
Folks

Thanks very much for your comments.

Will probably wait and have a drive of the Discovery 4 as it appears out of this and the 200.

Cheers
AnswerID: 370548

Reply By: Member - Tom V (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 18:50

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 18:50
Corio
if i remember rightly, in the same magazine one of the writers owns a D3 that is kitted out for outback travel. Vic Wildman, I think. every now & again he lets slip some glowing articles on his D3. so his is still running OK.
I will seriously look @ the D3 or D4 @ around 12/09 to take advantage of Mr Rudd's 50% depreciation. cheers Tom
AnswerID: 370550

Reply By: CJ - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:43

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:43
Many people have opinions, and you will always get divided reviews. 8 seats v 7 v 5, look, feel, smell, etc. and these are often determined after a relatively short test drive

But to one question -

"Which car do you trust to do long remote outback trips with, giving you touring drive comfort, range, reliability, availability of spare parts, and general 'outbackability' ?"

The answer will overwhelmingly be in favour of the Cruiser

Cheers,

CJ
AnswerID: 370564

Follow Up By: tim_c - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:53

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 19:53
Hmmm, I'm not sure that it would win a "comfort" contest over a Disco. And the new Landcruiser has as much electronic wizardry as the Disco3!

Admittedly, Toyota does seem to have a better reputation with their electrical systems than LR.
0
FollowupID: 637876

Follow Up By: GimmeeIsolation - Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 21:10

Wednesday, Jun 17, 2009 at 21:10
I don't know how more remote I can get than criss-crossing OZ avoiding the bitumen and trying a different track each time on my own. I have broken my back twice and NO other has the comfort of the Discovery SE, if you think different you haven't driven one. With my extra tank ( as the others require also bar the Prado ) I get nearly 1900 kms between refills. I haven't had any breakdowns and "outbackability" ?, read some reviews and believe them. The 200 series seats feel like wooden park benches compared to the Discovery. I also spent several years taking Japanese 4X4 wagons/campers across the country delivering them where required so I have tried the Toyota range, I think a lot of owners need a medal for putting up with the seats/suspension. Toyota charge a premium on the 200 series because there will always be people who will buy them anyway without believing reviews. All the editors/tests of these 4X4 mags worldwide are not in collusion to sell LandRovers as much as Tojo drivers think. I get many startled looks ( rear-vision mirrors seem optional ) when I'm alongside them going past on the corrugations even with my broken back. AND if people want to keep their old bangers because they are reliable, just don't have an accident as I have seen the inside of rehabilitation centres and spent nearly a year in a wheelchair and it's not nice, the old bangers have no safety features to compare, lying there in the bed or being fed by someone you will wonder ( if you can ) what that life would of been like had you spent that money on a 4X4 with extra safety features. Anyway - each to their own, just check those mirrors.
0
FollowupID: 637899

Follow Up By: CJ - Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 10:35

Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 10:35
Points well noted, safety is indeed important but note all three the vehicles under discussion are up there in that regard

I agree with the seats, etc. but these are relatively small items, I stand by my overall statement that if one had to choose between these three considering all the pros and cons, the majority will go for the cruiser.

Yes one may have softer seats, colder a/c, bigger mirrors, quieter engine, fold-up seats vs fold down, etc. etc. but the overall package, considering the question posed, I'd say the cruiser by a landslide

CJ
0
FollowupID: 637949

Follow Up By: tim_c - Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 11:40

Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 11:40
CJ, that's fine, but there are many people who don't go for the 'Cruiser for one reason or another. That's why there are other vehicle manufacturers making other 4WDs. You should be thankful for them - can you imagine the price of your 'Cruiser if Toyota had no competitors?!
0
FollowupID: 637958

Follow Up By: The Landy - Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 13:34

Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 13:34
Hi CJ

To follow up on your question…..

“But to one question -

"Which car do you trust to do long remote outback trips with, giving you touring drive comfort, range, reliability, availability of spare parts, and general 'outbackability' ?" The answer will overwhelmingly be in favour of the Cruiser”.

I think the one major question that is (almost always) left out of these discussions is which vehicle represents the best value for money, after all vehicles are a considerable capital expense and therefore you want to get the best bang for your buck.

I hear the points you put forward in favour of the ‘Crusier’ but at what price versus the alternatives?

A quick comment on the points you highlighted…….

Drive comfort – Well I drive a ‘Fender (and loving it) so I probably have no place to comment on this one (although I find the ‘Fender comfortable).

Range – Unless you are contemplating a CSR trip, or similar, the standard range for most vehicles will be sufficient between refueling opportunities.

Reliability – As broad a statement as it is, it is fair to say most breeds of modern four-wheel drive vehicles are reliable, and equally most have their own unique issues. Know what these are, service the vehicle regularly and ahead of major trips and reliability will be fine.

Spare Parts – In this day and age most places keep limited spares simply because spares for modern vehicles are an expensive inventory, consequently most manufacturers are able to supply parts to most places in Australia as quick as transportation allows, in many cases overnight, but usually less than a few days.

General Outbackability – I guess you would need to consider the criteria to measure this….
0
FollowupID: 637974

Reply By: GLX3000 - Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 17:46

Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 17:46
Best reason to keep the 100 series is the 200 series. Looked at getting the 200, instead got an '08 Exceed. The 200's power plant (petrol and diesel) were very impressive, but I reckon they are the ugliest little duck never built by the Brits or the Russians. Camped next to a 200 series owner in Eucla. Asked his opinion. He made me feel good about my Paj. Said his dealer was going to get a visit from him when he got back. Mumbled something about fuel consumption bullsh*t. And he wasn't even towing.

Resale value? I'm betting the 200's won't hold it.

wood4me
AnswerID: 370718

Follow Up By: CJ - Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 20:46

Thursday, Jun 18, 2009 at 20:46
Resale might not hold it better than 100 (an opinion), but if yo research redbook and based on Toyo history, it will hold it far better than the lando (researched opinion)
;-) ;-)
We said this thread would open a can...
0
FollowupID: 638058

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)