Batteries for sinkers

Submitted: Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 20:39
ThreadID: 70069 Views:5887 Replies:16 FollowUps:14
This Thread has been Archived
How much lead is in a 4x4 battery, is it worth the effort to make sinkers because at $4.50 a sinker and having a few batteries lying around it it worth the hassle of buying a mould and making them.
If so what is the how did you do it.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:05

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:05
Hi Haza,
Sinkers are dead easy to male if you've got the right gear.

I've never used battery lead as I was always worried about the acid coming out as the lead was melted. But thinking about it lead really isn't all that porous so a good fresh water wash first should solve that problem.

Something to melt the lead within is important and this is the bit I believe you can't skimp on. I went to Blackwoods (they are an engineering supplier, not sure were you come from) and bought a ladle, mine is about 100mm in dia and about 40mm deep with a nice long handle.

You'll need something to generate heat obviously. I use an LPG torch under the ladle, the burner tip is about 20mm in diameter. I don't like Oxy-Acetylene for this job as if you look away or get distracted it's possible for the ladle to get a localised hot spot and blow a hole in it. (Experience passed down to me from my grandfather)

The moulds you can get from most any tackle shop in the size you require.

I use an old bicycle spoke through the hole in the mould, the part the line passes through.

This is the experience bit, when to pull the spoke. If too early the lead hasn't yet set and the holes close over. Too late and the lead grabs the spoke and you have to melt the sinkers back into the ladle and start again.

It'll take a few goes for the mould to warm up and get some decent sinkers out of it.

You'll also need a vice or like to hold the mould halves closed while you are pouring the lead as well as a pair of pliers to pull the bicycle spoke.

Now for the Internet disclaimer part (God I hate interweb princesses),
Be bloody careful, wear appropriate safety equipment.
If you inhale lead fumes your pecker may drop off.

Have fun, it isn't that hard at all. Old windows have lead flashing too.

I get lead sheet off my brother in laws dad as he changes windows for a living.

Geoff


Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 371395

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 07:43

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 07:43
"Be bloody careful, wear appropriate safety equipment."

Safety Glasses are a MUST!

water, even damp lead and molten lead DONT MIX...Remember that!!!
and even cold objects can also react violentlty with molten lead
0
FollowupID: 638688

Follow Up By: Ozboc - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 09:35

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 09:35
yes if possible try to preheat your mold a little also - this will stop the "shock" and the lead wont splatter

have any of you guys ever been to a Galvanizing place? i used to do contract work at Industrial Galvanizers in western sydney and when you see how violent a reaction the molten zink has with the cold metal is scarey, have not been there for years but when i was there last they didnt even have guards around the molten pools - and they were the size of a small olympic pool -- one slip and you in ...

im sure its changed now ! either way - when working with molted steel presume the worse will happen and be prepared accordingly. For those that have to fill out JSA's in the coarse of there jobs should have a good idea on safety - keep a bucket of cold water handy incase of burns - and a fire extinguisher if your not in an open padock where there is no risk of fire

Boc

0
FollowupID: 638699

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 10:51

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 10:51
Hi MN1,
I use a face shield and probably should have mentioned that bit. Bloody frustrating, we just know stuff and assume others do too.

And the wet metal bit is bloody good advice. If you ever get to see the movie put out by the French Aluminium Smelting crowd Pecheney (sp) were they dump a coke can full of molten aluminium into basically a bucket of water you'd be stunned by the explosive forces unleashed.

Hi Boc,
I sure have done work in galvanising plants, little has changed over the years. Open baths of hot caustic, acid and molten zinc.

Very sobering places!

Geoff
Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 638705

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 17:35

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 17:35
is that the one in a half enclosed bunker?
0
FollowupID: 638770

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 22:06

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 22:06
That's the one, have you seen it?

Geoff

Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 638832

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 07:29

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 07:29
I was doing airconditioning works for Castalloy (before they became ION and then New Castalloy now owned by Harley Davidson)

back then to be inducted onto site invloved the OHSW process which included that film ---- Made me take notice. They went onto explain that is is believed a secondary explosion takes place with the superheated steam and somehow hydrogen gets involved.....
0
FollowupID: 638849

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 09:26

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 09:26
We have two smelters here in the Hunter Valley and the induction process for both sites used to involve that film. (Long time since I've been to either site)

That's my understanding too, somehow the superheated steam liberates the Hydrogen and it ignites. From there it is a bloody big eye opener!

Geoff

Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 638870

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 09:37

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 09:37
just 2 weeks ago one of the guys up at the pistol club had collected lead from the range to smelt down for casting which he was doing on the range......he thought it was dry (maybe had some damp sand on it)....efin lead all over the roof ...thank god he wasnt injured
0
FollowupID: 638873

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:10

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:10
The stuff has to be totally dry or it'll sure cause big troubles!

He was a very lucky man.

The boss just sparked up the PC with the upside down picture, took him and another bloke an hour to work out what was wrong and fix it. I've got tears rolling down my cheeks.

They even turned the monitor upside down during the process!

Geoff

Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 638876

Follow Up By: Member No 1- Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:01

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:01
hahaha took a while but you got em
0
FollowupID: 638885

Reply By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:06

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:06
Is it worth losing your fingers to the amount of acid still left on the plates and if you heat them up may make toxic fumes.



AnswerID: 371396

Reply By: Ted (Cairns) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:24

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:24
I got to see the blood lead levels of a bloke who was making sinkers and occasionally cleaning a rifle range, and they were NOT looking good. Plus the acid... Personally I'd rather buy them, let some chinese factory deal with their WH&S ROFLMAO. But if you decide to do it yourself, please be careful.
AnswerID: 371404

Reply By: Member - Ed. C. (QLD) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:25

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:25
Four Dollars Fifty a sinker????? Holy Bat, Cowman!!!!

Used'ta do it all the time.. haven't done it for a while (I've got a good stock of lead ingots), but at $4.50 a sinker(!!!), my pile o' dead batteries has just got a whole lot more attractive (less ugly'-)), and I think I'll be hangin' on to my sinker molds for a while longer....

When I was "into" that sort of thing, I was even makin' my own shot (as in pellets for re-loading shotshells).. still have the shot-maker too.....

Once ya start meltin' down batteries, you'll soon find that it's a fair bit of work (and mess) for relatively little reward, but at $4.50 a sinker(!!!!), well that puts a whole 'nother perspective on it;-))

Easiest way I found, if ya have access to an old 44gal. drum, cut the top out, punch it fulla holes, & a decent size hole in the bottom, bit of a trench under the drum, light a decent (hardwood) fire in the drum, and progressively throw in the batteries, one at a time, and the lead will melt & run out the hole in the bottom & (hopefully) into your pre-prepared trench.. make sure the batteries are well drained (& dry) before chuckin' em in the fire, or you might get a few "surprises";-))
Depending on the amount of lead, the resultant "glob" which you'll (theoretically) have when it all cools down, can be cut into convenient size bits with an axe (or similar semi-sharp instrument;-) for further umm, processing ...

Much better (& easier) if ya have a mate (or 3) who are tyre fitters.. the wheel weights are much less of a hassle...

Oh yeah, and the bike spoke (mentioned above).. coat it occasionally with powdered graphite;-)

$4.50 a sinker...................... Wow......
(just goes to show how long it since I've paid for sinkers;-))

$4.50.... Geez

;-))

Confucius say.....
"He who lie underneath automobile with tool in hand,
....Not necessarily mechanic!!"

Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 371405

Follow Up By: Geoff (Newcastle, NSW) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:30

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 21:30
Thanks Ed,

Never ever thought of powdered graphite on the bike spoke!

Bloody good idea!

Geoff

Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 638666

Follow Up By: Welldone WA - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 13:58

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 13:58
The spoke lubed with graphite is good but a tad grubby.
I use a small block of beeswax and just drag the warmed spoke through it once
every three or four casts and the sinkers slip without effort and without mess.
I haven't tried it but maybe the wax from an ordinary candle will also work.
0
FollowupID: 638730

Reply By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:13

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:13
If you go down to the local tyre place they might let you walk out with all the left over tyre weights.

I picked up about a 10 litre bucket's worth last time I went.

It does take a bit of sorting the non-lead weights from the leads but you can do it while the latest lot's melting.

Cheers.
AnswerID: 371411

Reply By: Madfisher - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:19

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:19
Most sinkers you buy now I believe are not lead, for various reasons from people putting split shot sinkers in the mouth to close them up(which I was guilty of as a kid) to worries of excess lead in waterways and ultimately in the fish we eat. Something to thing about.
Cheers Pete
AnswerID: 371414

Reply By: Member - Stuart P (WA) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:43

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:43
there is more lead in the terminals than the rest of the battery!
AnswerID: 371417

Reply By: Mad Cowz (VIC) - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:47

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 22:47
I got a better idea,
I went snorkelling for Abalone a few years ago but didn't find any. the area was popular for rock fishing also. people must have got so many snags, i came out of the water with 27 sinkers that I had picked off the rocks in about 2 metres of water, various sized barrel sinkers, a couple of those star shaped ones and others, only took about 2 or 3 minutes to collect them.

MadCowz
Carpe Cerevisi

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 371420

Reply By: Haza - Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 23:45

Monday, Jun 22, 2009 at 23:45
Thanks fo the replies guys, I was looking at this because where I live the tides are huge and it's not uncommon to use 12oz sinkers, going to the tyre fitters sounds like a go. A few of my friend actually dive on wrecks collecting lead.
A friend told me of making them from lead he purchased, the hardest thing was cutting the blocks.
Living here in North W.A it's not worth getting the lead up here, I do go and collect everthing from lures to sinkers off the rocks on low tide some days it really pays off.
Any ideas of what else has lead.
AnswerID: 371424

Follow Up By: V8 Troopie - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 00:04

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 00:04
You find that old underground electrical cables have a lead jacket. Got my ballast lead from that source off a scrap metal dealer. A bit messy to melt as there is tar to burn off but much better idea than battery terminals.
0
FollowupID: 638683

Reply By: landed eagle - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 07:01

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 07:01
Try your local stained glass repairer (leadlight shop). I pull apart about 100 old stained glass windows a year to rebuild them. Lots of old lead thats reasonably clean. The scrap metal guys love it when I call them to collect it.

Or just buy a few lengths of #53 border lead as new and melt it down. My FIL is always round at my place stealing lengths for his fishing exploits.

If you're going to be mucking around with lead, its worth buying a bottle of a special hand soap called 'D-Lead'. It binds with the metal particles left on the skin that ordinary soaps DONT remove.Try to track it down if possible.

Cheers all,safe travels.

AnswerID: 371431

Reply By: Member - Johny boy (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 07:56

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 07:56
Hi Haza,
I work on building sites from time to time and I find the left over flashing in the rubbish piles ,a great clean supply of lead or if you have any mates that work for Telstra and work on mains THAT'S THE BIGGER CABLES they might be able to collect for you as well ,I think I would rather use these than play with batteries and I think you can sell the batteries these days so that money can go towards the molds?? just a thought good luck mate !

Cheers
AnswerID: 371440

Reply By: Ozboc - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 08:34

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 08:34
HI there , where are you , i have a friend near campbeltown that is looking to get rid of a heap of lead- let me know if your interested and i will get in contact with him next time he is up in sydney ( lives down south but has it at his other house up here )

boc
AnswerID: 371448

Follow Up By: The Landy - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 11:35

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 11:35
A generous offer by your friend.....but a $4.50 a sinker there might be money in him selling it off if he has a fair bit of it. Especially given the price of lead...., but money isn't everthing either!

Good luck out there....
0
FollowupID: 638706

Reply By: Member - michael H (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 10:13

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 10:13
Hi Haza

As a kid my Grandfather took us fishing a lot and would use strips of lead for sinkers.
He would cut strips about 25mm - 30mm and coil them up in a tight cylindrical shape and just keep rolling until you get the weight your after give them a little pinch when done.
When wanting to lighten the weight just unroll and cut off. Too Easy
We also used spark plugs with the ends closed off.


Cheers Michael
AnswerID: 371460

Reply By: Member - Gary J (NSW) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 10:44

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 10:44
There's plenty of lead in the streets of Melbourne.
Just ask Judy Moran.

Sorry !
AnswerID: 371464

Reply By: Flywest - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 12:53

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 12:53
I prefer to use th elead wheel weights, gives the knees jipper down on all 4's in car parks in the dark at night collecting them but! (Kidding, I get em for a carton of cold beer from the local tyre shop on a Friday arvo near knock off time!) ;o)

I use a 3 ring burner connected to a 9 kilo gas bottle with a regulator!

I melt them in a steel camp over, so you cabn get plenty hot at the one time.

Also as others have said - don't breath the fumes & wear protective clothing and safety gear for head & eyes etc.

I Heat the moulds (clamped in a vice) and ladel them full with a stainless steel soup ladel.

Seems to work OK - I make a lot of 32 ouncers for deep dropping when swordfishing at night so that uses a LOT of lead in each pour.

A milk crate full of 2 pound sinkers I can't lift.

Cheers
AnswerID: 371485

Reply By: Tim Owen - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 21:06

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 21:06
Suggested reading

http://www.health.vic.gov.au/environment/downloads/lead_sinkers.pdf

Lead can cause reduced brain function, including memory and concentration problems, learning and behaviour problems in children. The last thing we want is kids with elevated blood lead levels, or to leave anything in the environment which may result in future exposure.

Please be careful.
AnswerID: 371577

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)