Condensation in camper

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 22:19
ThreadID: 70101 Views:5040 Replies:8 FollowUps:9
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Hi All,
I have a real problem with condensation dripping off the inside roof of our camper. Has anyone got any suggestions on prevention. Cheers
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Reply By: Roughasguts - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 22:28

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 22:28
You need to open some windows, and not have a heater running constantly.
But if you already do that, well I don't know what's next.
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:10

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:10
Or dont breathe LOL





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Follow Up By: Member - Doug T (NT) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:31

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:31
Graham
YOU BEAT ME

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Reply By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:48

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:48
Welcome to living under canvas in winter, be it camper, tent swag or what ever.

Cheers Pesty
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Reply By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:48

Tuesday, Jun 23, 2009 at 23:48
We had this problem in an earlier camper and solved it by getting a yacht ventilator and fitted it at the canvas high-point using a flange of marine plywood glued on either side of the canvas.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - Brian R (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 00:30

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 00:30
Hi Rev's

How about buying a tarp ....just one of those cheap things, cover the top of your camper put some neat guy ropes to hold it clear of the canvas and I think you will see a difference
Brian R
AnswerID: 371602

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 07:12

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 07:12
I agree Brian.

Placing a fly over the tent canvas and creating an air gap between the two layers may well resolve the problem.

A cheap solution if it works.

Bill.
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Follow Up By: Twinkles - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:36

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:36
The tarp has worked for me too
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Reply By: Member Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 08:23

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 08:23
We just had a week in Canberra camping in a mates back yard and the first night we experienced the condensation thing. We put a tarp over the canvas for the remainder of our week there and were dry every morning! Speaking as one who hates tarps, ropes and poles, and always tries to keep aforementioned tarps, ropes and poles to a minimum, it made me realise that it is worth the efoort to be a little more comfortable. So the tarp is going over the trailer every time now.


Cheers

Brian
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Follow Up By: Moose - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:22

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:22
G'day Brian
Did you allow the tarp touch the camper roof at any point? Or did you use poles to keep it totally suspended above?
Cheers from the Moose
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Follow Up By: Member Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:29

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:29
Hi Moose,

I know the theory is to have an air break between the roof and the tarp but we didn't have the necessary gear to do that so just let the tarp lay on the roof of the trailer. And we slept "condensation free" for the duration, including 2 mornings where Jack Frost paid a visit, yet we were dry inside.

Cheers

Brian
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Follow Up By: Moose - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:34

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 11:34
Thanks for that Brian
Our camper's roofline is so bloody high that getting the supposed necessary air gap would involve a major engineering exercise - so I've never bothered. Thanks to your experimentation I'm now glad to hear that we don't need to go to any extremes to achieve success! So next time I might just try it your way too.
Cheers from the Moose
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Follow Up By: Member Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 16:05

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 16:05
Moose,
you're welcome mate, let me know how you get on with it when you try it out next.

Cheers

Brian
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Reply By: Member - Royce- Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:28

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 10:28
Had the same prob as I toured through the desert areas last week. I'll watch for more suggestions.

Ventilation seems to be the only real option as the condensation happens when the moist inside air touches the very cold shell of the camper.
AnswerID: 371629

Reply By: REV'S - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 14:41

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 14:41
Thank you all for your replys.

I should have stated that I have a slide-on camper with a hard roof, there is no canvas at all. But I think the simply solution is to have air circulation via a open window.
Regards Rev's

AnswerID: 371653

Follow Up By: Member - Allan B (QLD) - Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 15:28

Wednesday, Jun 24, 2009 at 15:28
Even with a window partly open there is still a tendency for warm moist air (e.g. exhaled breath) to rise and condense on the cool roof. A roof-top ventilator is the most effective answer.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Members - Bow & Nan - Thursday, Jun 25, 2009 at 08:28

Thursday, Jun 25, 2009 at 08:28
What are you doing in the camper to cause all that heavy breathing
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