Puncher repair kits

Submitted: Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:16
ThreadID: 74852 Views:4474 Replies:8 FollowUps:16
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Finally got a screw in one of a 285 Cooper Descover ST. Partly excited as this, would give me the opportunity to try out my recently purchased tyre repair kit. I read all the instructions and went to work. Could not get the plunger into the tyre. Tried the cordless drill to enlarge the hole. Still not luck.

Despiration took over and I headed for the local Goodyear dealer. (No Cooper dealer in town). When I wheeled in the tyre, he looked depressed and after breaking 4 repair things and failing to get it through, gave up.

He glued a patch on the inside and it works fine. Now I am not at all confident at the prospect, of repairing a tyre in the middle of nowhere.

Am I doing something wrong or are these things not that good. I carry 4 spares but still would like this option.
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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:20

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:20
Did you get all of the screw out first??

It may have snapped off in the tyre tread thus preventing the plunger to work.


Cheers Kev
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Reply By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:25

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:25
Well after using a drill on it I wouldnt drive on it anywhere.

You could have damaged the cords and the steel belt which may or may not

let go spectacularly and will be much worse than a PUNCTURE.


Cheers

Plugs are not considered permanent fixes anyway according to the Cooper 4wd Drivers guide I was reading yesterday.


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Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh (NSW) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:39

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:39
Yeah, I agree Graham,
Damage the wire and it can't be good.

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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:48

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:48
Hi Carl
We never rely on our plug sets that we take when heading bush. We always carry Tyrepliers ,good quality tyre levers and rubber mallet as well as a complete variety of patches. There have been a couple of times when plugs were not enough and had to take the tyre off of the rim for a patch.

It comes back to our Boy Scout days, and Be Prepared for anything.

Cheers

Stephen
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:14

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:14
Yep, here's what I travel with. It doesn't mention the two spares either.



Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:30

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:30
Hi Mick
Firstly a very Happy New Year and all the best for 2010. Great set up you have there. You have a couple of extra goodies that I do not use, eg the wire brush on the drill and the Bead Breaker. I use the Tyrepliers, have had them for many years now and have used them many times. I thought that I was only the silly person that kept the pieces of offending Mulga as a souvenir.

One item that must have still been in the bag would have been a good quality rubber mallet, for refitting the tyre to the rim after the repairs.

Take care.

Regards

Stephen
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:48

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:48
Haven't needed one this year Stephen. With the R&R, you reverse it to assist with fitting the tyre. The securing lip acts as a slide for the last, most difficult section of the bead levering it over the rim edge. Hard to visualise I know but it works and no hammers or hard work needed LOL.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 21:02

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 21:02
Hi Mick
Sounds great. Something else not to worry about taking.

Cheers

Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 23:19

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 23:19
Hi Mick, very informative as alway, thanks.

I couldn't quite here the nane of the large tyre patches - Rena Tiptop??

Also where do you purchase them and the Maverick Bond pls?

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: Richard Kovac - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 01:14

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 01:14
John

REMA TIP TOP WA
2/1-9 Kurnall Road
Welshpool WA 6106
PH: (08) 6253 1900
Fax: (08) 9356 2831

They sell to the public

I buy all my gear off them,,, not as much as Mick by the looks..

But I did take some note down after watching the video

Regards

Richard
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 13:12

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 13:12
John,

most tyre repair places will have the Rema TipTop radial patches for sale. The Maverick Bond I got direct from the agent. They are listed here or you can order on line.

Maverick Bond.


Cheers Mick
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Reply By: Glenndini - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:53

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:53
"Puncher" repair kit??????
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Follow Up By: Notso - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:56

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 18:56
Yep, that's what Mundine will probably need when he fights next???

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Reply By: Mick O - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:24

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:24
Carl,

As the known destroyer of tyres that I am, I can offer this advice. From the way you’ve described it, you’ve no doubt managed to poke a hole through the tread section of the tyre. Believe it or not, these are the hardest punctures to get under any circumstances and it’s normally only a tek-screw or a fine jewellers screwdriver (a long story) that will manage to penetrate the steel belts.

The most important thing to remember when using a plug kit in a tread puncture, as opposed to a side wall penetration, is to have everything ready to go. It’s imperative that you keep an eye on the offending article as it’s removed so you know the exact direction/path that it penetrated the tyre. As the steel belts and Kevlar cords will slide back to their original position once the offending article is removed, unless you follow the exact track in, you may as well be trying to drive a knitting needle through 2mm plate!

Some of the plug kits come with a lubricating grease to assist the reamer (my description) in sliding between the belts for a plug puncture. If you’ve got a puncture through the tread while close to home or civilisation, I’d always take it straight to a tyre place for repair. If the offending item is steel, like a nail, screw or jewellers screwdriver, I’d recommend sliding the reamer in beside it while it’s still in the tyre. Then pull out the offender and push the plug in along the reamer on exactly the same track using the reamer to lever apart the belts. Once you’ve got the plug in, carefully slide out the reamer before doing the 180 degree twist and removing the plug tool.

There are two types of reamer you’ll see on the market. One has a fairly aggressive edge, almost serrated. Others, like the ARB, are smoother and have less vicious edges. On a tread puncture, use the less vicious reamer. It’s only to slide in and part the belts. A serrated edge one will catch and bend both wires and cords and that’s a no-no. Either reamer will do on a sidewall puncture. Tread punctures are a bastard to deal with and best left to the professionals unless you’re well away from home

The secret is matching the path of the puncturing object. Hope that helps.

Mick.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:37

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:37
P.S. Don't use a drill on your tyres.

And, well done for trying. It's the only way you learn. I've done exactly the same things. Still learning.

Cheers Mick
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Follow Up By: kevanancy - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:38

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:38
Thanks Mick O I'll be remembering that advice in case I need it .
Kev.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:55

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 19:55
Always handy Kev, just hope you don't need the advice LOL. I'm currently putting all my bit's a pieces of tyre repair video together. Having done far too many repairs, the video is far too long!!! Hopefully I'll get motivated to finish it and will post it to the site for a laugh soon enough. There's a bit of video in this blog from my trip our west in 2009 around puncture repairs. I managed to stake 3 tyres in as many kilometres and was not a happy boy. I'm loading one up now which I hope Carl won't mind, I'll link to his post later on.

Outback tyre repairs in the Great Sandy Desert 2009

Cheers Mick
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:26

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:26
Tek screws only create a small hole, and I'll assume you had a tread puncture (sidewall punctures on Cooper ST are very easy to plug because of the thin sidewall).

There are two common thicknesses of plugs. I carry both - the thinner ones are the very long black ones you often find on the Bushranger stand at the 4wd shops. I cut them in half and use the reamer as little as is required to enable the plug to be inserted.

Plugging tyres has a long learning curve to get good reliable repairs. Its good to watch someone who is well practiced with the use of plugs. There are lots of kits out there requiring different glues/ lubricants and tools. I've found kits using glue to work the best.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:37

Sunday, Jan 03, 2010 at 20:37
Hi Phil
A very Happy New Year to you and your family. Good point about the glue, I forgot to mention it in my post. I have found a little glue on the plug before inserting it helps to push the plug in and acts as a lubricant and helps set the plug. In the past I found that the plugs used with glue have never leaked, while not as good a success rate with non glued plugs.

Each to their own.

Regards

Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil B (WA) - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 01:08

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 01:08
I agree with Stephen L

Use some glue on you plug to act as a lubricant and to set the plug.

I have had a much higher success rate with glued plugs. Never had one pop out whereas non glued plugs have at times popped out in the bush.

cheers

Phil
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 13:14

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 13:14
Yep, I forgot to mention the glue as well.
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Reply By: get outmore - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 02:14

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 02:14
was the tyre deflated? very hard to penatrate a deflated tyre - it needs to be pumped up
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Reply By: Member - Carl- Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 09:17

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 09:17
Thanks everyone for all the advice. No matter how much you think you know, there is always more to learn.

I should have mentioned that between the LC, spares and caravan, there are 12 matching alloy wheels and tyres.

Mention was made of tyre levers and although I have done steel rims with them, always thought they rip alloy to pieces? Are there special levers for alloy wheels?

I recognise the point about using a drill, an indication of my level of despiration. To my suprise the tyre repair guy used a reemer on a drill to enlarge the hole.

The DVD on how to repair tyres is a great idea.

So my conclusion is that with training they can be used and the training was what letmedown. Thanks
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Follow Up By: trainslux - Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 17:55

Monday, Jan 04, 2010 at 17:55
Having used the safety seal plugs for years when I was a mechanic. And found all sorts of items including knifes, forks, pens, syringe needles, nails, screws, bolts, wood, steel reo bars, and many other items that defied description.
What ive found is this.

Firstly, finding the angle of the offending item is important.
Secondly, very rarely did I use the tool to "clean" the hole
vaseline works fine for lube if needed.
Have done tread/ sidewall etc, including one that we did for "research purposes" that had 5 plugs in it, and held back to where the tyre could be disposed of.

When the tyre is soft, and low on pressure, its alot harder to fit the seal than if its near full pressure, and the escaping air helps in cleaning out the debrits from the hole anyway.

And what has been suggested before is also good advice.

hope this helps.

Trains
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