Tubes for Landcruiser Tyres

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 13:48
ThreadID: 75196 Views:4103 Replies:5 FollowUps:6
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I have recently purchased a 200 series LandCruiser. I was in the bush with a mate who has a 100 series. He shredded a tyre and we had to put a spare tyre on the rim but we couldn't inflate it no matter what we did because we couldn't get the bead to seat on the rim. Fortunately I happened to have a spare tube from my old 100 series and we were able to solve the problem.

Now to my problem -- I thought I should get some spare tubes for my BFG 285/70 R17 tyres should I have the same problem. However I have been told by numerous tyre dealers that they simply are not available.

Does anyone have any ideas about either where I might be able to buy a suitable tube or how I might seat the tyre bead on the rim?

I hope someone can help.
Peter
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Reply By: Ozhumvee - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 14:03

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 14:03
You either need a big blast of compressed air from a tank or similar or resort to the manual methods.
The safest and easiest way is to use a ratchet strap around the outside circumference of the tyre (around the tread), then pull the strap up until the tyre starts to seal against the rim and then inflate the tyre.
You need plenty of tyre soap (I carry Lux soap flakes and mix as required) and a good compressor.
I don't recommend the butane gas method as I've seen a tyre let go using that method.
I'd also reckon that at a pinch you could use a 16" tube on your rims to get you out of trouble as the rubber would stretch that little bit required.
Peter
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Follow Up By: Member - Peter S (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 14:11

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 14:11
We tried that using a ratchet strap & my mate is an experienced tyre changing hand. He used to do it for a living. We used lots of soap and have a very good compressor. In years gone by I used to have an old divers tank I used for that blast of air but it is now too old and I can't get it refilled. I have now given away my 16 inch tubes but might try and get one back.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 14:57

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 14:57
Peter,
just following on from Ozhumvee's good suggestions,

To get the blast of air, I use one of my tyres as an air tank - have it pumped up to 80psi, get everything right, and use a hose between the two valves. Both valve cores need to be removed.

I've actually made up something a bit fancier to transfer the air, but something as simple as a length of 3/8th rubber hose between the two valves will be good enough.

I've never found the ratchet strap to work - the newer steel radials seem to cave in when I try it. I also carry a 16" bike tube to bridge the gap between the bead and the rim.

As far as tubes go, you can buy a multisize tube - it will stretch to fit bigger tyres. I also think a 16 inch tube might fit a 17 inch rim at a pinch. A friend in the tyre business advised me to use the same tubes when I upsized my 16" tyres.

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Follow Up By: Member - Peter S (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 15:07

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 15:07
Hey I like that idea of using the spare to give a blast of air. We also had the problem of the caving tyre with the strap.

I think I will also carry the 16 inch tubes just in case.
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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew L (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 15:40

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 15:40
Thats what I do, use a spare as an air reservoir/tank. A good rim and decent tyre will see 80 psi easy. Apart from helping to reinflate tyres, it does great at cleaning dusty air filters too, with a nozzle.

Works best for access if you have vertical mounted rear spare wheel/s.
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Reply By: Mick O - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 15:32

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 15:32
There are all sorts of bush remedies and I've tried most of them. I have had no issue reseating the tyre with just an ordinary compressor providing the bead is well lubricated with soapy goo (as per Peters suggestion). The tyre must be verticle though and not lying on the ground. It ensures the rim sits centred in the tyre. Also make sure the valve is out so the air going in is not inhibited at all.

There is the butane method that I have used to good effect but don't reccomend. There are safety issues naturally but it does work.

Reseating a tyre with Butane Gas

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Follow Up By: Member - Rob S (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 20:04

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 20:04
Hey Mick

That Butane method works, well certainly got your SWMOB giggling.
Aero start or start you bastard and lighter fluid works well to i believe.
Possibly hair spray as well.

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and that's when I thought I was wrong!

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Follow Up By: Mick O - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 20:58

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 20:58
Your right there Rob on all counts except the maniacal giggling. That's Scotties other half and bush washing machine, Gaby, our International EO members from Canada. She runs on Baileys & coffee.

Cheers Mick

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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 20:04

Thursday, Jan 14, 2010 at 20:04
Hi Peter S...
Firstly i have tried the ratchet strap and the tyre vertical, no way could i reseat the tyre even with my spare tyre at 60 PSi and valves removed. I have a better idea...I though this out after my last failure to reseat the beads......... Carry a tube that suits the same rim diameter but designed for a narrower tyre and a few new tubeless valves. Remove the damaged tubeless tyre and the tubeless valve stem, put the new tyre on both sides of the rim and push the tube in position from the front of the rim. Soap up the rear bead and inflate, obviously with the tube in the tyre, it doesn't matter about the flow of the air so pump up until the rear bead pops on the tyre, the rear soapy bead should pop on first. When that happens, remove the valve from the tube to deflate the tube and push on the front wall to get the tube back out. (if the front bead does happen to pop on also, just break that front bead again). With the tube removed, install the new valve stem and inflate with the valve removed as you normally would. Now you can push on the centre of the rim and pull the tyre towards you to reduce the gap between the rim and bead and the the tyre will inflate easily and the front bead will seat easily. The problem with both beads broken in a normal situation is getting the tyre to touch both sides of the rim to form a seal, seating a tyre with only one bead broken is easy. The best thing about this is that you dont need a heap of air, so just about any compressor will do. On some rims, you may have to soap the front bead and insert tube from the back of the rim as there is usually more room in the rear of the rim to insert and remove the tube. I haven't tried this but i will the first time i have the opportunity!!! Michael



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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Friday, Jan 15, 2010 at 23:11

Friday, Jan 15, 2010 at 23:11
The other reason that you had trouble was probably the way the spare tyre was stored - I'd guess it was tied down on a roofrack. This pushes the beads together and after levering on the new tyre, the beads don't want to push towards the rim.

Stretching it apart (with say a tube) before putting the tyre onto the rim , may help in this regard. It's also a reasonable idea to carry a spare casing with an inflated tube inside it.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Jan 16, 2010 at 10:02

Saturday, Jan 16, 2010 at 10:02
Hi Phil,

That's a great idea!! It saves the tube being damaged amongst other gear, especially if its packed in a trailer where it gets a harder time than packed in a vehicle.. Michael
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