New Treknote - Great Western woodlands

Submitted: Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 16:34
ThreadID: 75801 Views:1675 Replies:2 FollowUps:8
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Hi all. I see from the latest newsletter that Damien has put up my treknote for the Great Western Woodlands.

Thanks are due to Equinox who first put up the route as a usertrek - Cheers Alan.

For those interested in conservation issues, there is an embedded link in the note to the Wilderness Society campaign for protection of these world class woodlands.

Best.
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Reply By: get outmore - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 16:38

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 16:38
Hmmm youve got to be a bit carefull. Iagree the area needs protecting but the widerness soceties charter is just that. Allow NO access by anyone anytime for any reason
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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 16:54

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 16:54
I can see your point Dave, given their stand on marine protection and reservation.

But I doubt that they'd achieve lock-up in this area - too many vested interests; particularly cashed up miners (as for the norther Yilgarn alas).

At least TWS having a go - no-one else is doing anything. I reckon a few good size national parks or nature reserves would be well worth it in this area (similar to the reserves proposed for the NY).

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 17:14

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 17:14
there have been several nat /cons parks formed in the woodlands fairly recently inclding the boorabin NP, DEC has bought out several stations one just recently - credo

it is a vast area and could do with alot more being done particulary in the areas of fire management (there is none - fires in the woodlands often burn for over 3 months)

and pastororlists need to be forced into feral reduction. The state of the woodlands in pastoral areas is pitifull compared to the srrounding VCL

besides the iron ore mines in the Yilgarn mining is alot more low impact in the woodlands with rehabbed sites actually providing habitat
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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 17:30

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 17:30
Agree with all thse points Dave.

Re the pastoralists - there are even sporadic attempts to open up the landclearing debate for the south of the region - just what we need; more aridzone clearing!

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 17:41

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 17:41
Just ludicrous as things point to drying out. Ive travelled the southrn extemities a bit south of the Dundas nature reserve SE of norseman and its an interesting mix of coastal banksias and gums and traditional woodlands. Its not till you spnd a week sowly working your way south until you hit paddocks and climb a granite rock to see woodlands where you camefrom and padocks where your going you realize the massive extent to which the SW is clearfelled.
Farmers say they work in the bush - but theres very little left of that
When it cools down I have a tip plane from Peak Charles to the fitzgerald NP and one thing I take note of is vegetation pattern change
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Reply By: Member - Phil B (WA) - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 19:23

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 19:23
Hi John,

Great T note, in my favourite bit of country. Isn't it amazing how quickly the bush has grown back from almost being clear felled in the 1950s and early 60s.

About three years ago I travelled through the area with an old timber cutter - he said the bush had grown back at least twice as thick as when he was cutting there in the late 50s. He added that it wouldn't take him long to get a load of wood in the new growth forest.
Interesting isn't it, that the new forest is much thicker than the old - yet it the same soil, rainfall etc.


Did you get across to the remains of the main camp at the end of the woodline rail line?

cheers

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 19:56

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 19:56
Thks Phil, Damien tells me you're going to put one up shortly too. Good stuff.

No I didn't get there. It seems everytime I get up into the Goldfields areas thunderstorms roll in - I'm jinxed! Had to bail out - I never risk staying in those soils, as a single vehicle, once the lightning and downpours start

Cheers.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 21:01

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 21:01
I have been through many stages of the woodland and it clears with age. when your passing through remnant not ever cut areas the trees are big and very well spaced. Saplings regrowing after fire are at the other end of the spectrum and are so dense you can barely push our way through them
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil B (WA) - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 22:18

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 22:18
Scared of a bit of rain John, where is your fighting spirit - lol.

I agree when its wet the bottom falls out of that country - it can be like driving in bottomless custard - like photo belowImage Could Not Be Found

If you get back to the area sing out and I'll be happy to give you some info etc.



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Follow Up By: Member - John Baas (WA) - Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 22:25

Friday, Feb 05, 2010 at 22:25
Thanks Phil, I'll do that.
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