Fitch fuel catalyst.

Submitted: Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 21:49
ThreadID: 7602 Views:1509 Replies:5 FollowUps:3
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Hi All,

A friend of mine fitted a fitch fuel catalyst to his boat, even though the economy is difficult to measure it sure seems to run smoother and cleaner( it cost around $300 for the in tank version. Does anyone have and experince with these in 4WD's? The site is as follows -www.fitchcatalyst.com.au
I understand they work for both fuels.
Regards Dennis
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Reply By: David N. - Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:09

Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:09
Tell 'im he's dreamin' IMHO
I'm the ultimate sceptic- you can't convince me these are real- the manufacturers would be onto them in a second, as fuel economy is a big selling point.
AnswerID: 32787

Follow Up By: Dennis - Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:16

Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:16
Hi david,
I'm a sceptic too with these kind of things but I understand they are law in some states in America! I guess I'm hoping to heard some peoples real experinces here.
Regards Dennis
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FollowupID: 23445

Reply By: ross - Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:58

Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:58
I have a few problems with the way the"proof"is submited.
Firstly something that has the potential to revolutionise the motoring industry deserves bit more testing than a couple of short drives in diesel landcruiser driven by their own logistics manager and then presented as scientific proof.Normally something as important as this would be tested on dozens of cars by independant and well known groups such as the RAC or NMRA.
Secondly the testimonials of "satisfied" customers can hardly be called scientific.
Many of the statements reek of the placebo effect,for example how can you judge the effectiveness of the product by "my foot doesnt seem to have to press so hard on the pedal"or something to that effect.
Thirdly after all the wonderful claims alluding to the product the tiny little disclaimer in the bottom left hand corner opens up a whole page denying that they guarantee their gadget will actually work on your particular car.
If a gadget like this could actually work then companies like GM ,Ford,and Toyota would be clambouring over each other for the lic to use it on their vehicles.
We seen it all before,Brockys fuel polariser,HiCLONE /Cyclone,water injection and the car that ran on water and the list goes on
AnswerID: 32794

Reply By: ross - Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:58

Saturday, Oct 04, 2003 at 22:58
I have a few problems with the way the"proof"is submited.
Firstly something that has the potential to revolutionise the motoring industry deserves bit more testing than a couple of short drives in diesel landcruiser driven by their own logistics manager and then presented as scientific proof.Normally something as important as this would be tested on dozens of cars by independant and well known groups such as the RAC or NMRA.
Secondly the testimonials of "satisfied" customers can hardly be called scientific.
Many of the statements reek of the placebo effect,for example how can you judge the effectiveness of the product by "my foot doesnt seem to have to press so hard on the pedal"or something to that effect.
Thirdly after all the wonderful claims alluding to the product the tiny little disclaimer in the bottom left hand corner opens up a whole page denying that they guarantee their gadget will actually work on your particular car.
If a gadget like this could actually work then companies like GM ,Ford,and Toyota would be clambouring over each other for the lic to use it on their vehicles.
We seen it all before,Brockys fuel polariser,HiCLONE /Cyclone,water injection and the car that ran on water and the list goes on
AnswerID: 32795

Follow Up By: Dennis - Sunday, Oct 05, 2003 at 23:23

Sunday, Oct 05, 2003 at 23:23
Hi Ross,
I understand your concerns although I'm still interested to hear from people who have tried them from this site. I know this isn't scientific proof but still interesting.
Regards Dennis
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FollowupID: 23490

Reply By: Savvas - Monday, Oct 06, 2003 at 07:47

Monday, Oct 06, 2003 at 07:47
Hi Dennis,

I would have thought that the economy would have been the easiest thing to measure. Before and after consumption figures would be by far the most objective assessment of whether these things actually work.

I'm also curious as to whether these things actually measure up. Anything that can help save some dollars at the bowser has got to be a good thing .... if it actually delivers.
AnswerID: 32856

Follow Up By: ross - Monday, Oct 06, 2003 at 10:06

Monday, Oct 06, 2003 at 10:06
Savvas you are right but with tests not conducted in the open by well known independant motoring orgnisations its imposible to say how reliable they are .They are never going to allow it to be scrutanised by someone that has the motoring publics best interests at heart. That was the point of my whole post.The advert seems to suggest that any motor running on any fuel will get about 10% better fuel economy.Sadly the disclaimer in paragraph 5 (I think) denies any guarantee that your car will achieve that fuel reduction and NO REFUNDS.Why didnt they put that in the advert ? This type of promotion shares a similarity with many other similar products that didnt work .Such as
Pseudo science that has no firm proof
Lots of selected satisfied customers but no unhappy ones for whom it didnt work
A disclaimer that only guarantees you will never see your money again

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FollowupID: 23503

Reply By: chrisfrd - Monday, Oct 06, 2003 at 22:28

Monday, Oct 06, 2003 at 22:28
Gees... Does your mate also believe that;

1) Elvis is alive and working in Burger King.
2) Iraq HAD WMD and could use such in 45 minutes.
3) Landcruisers are better than Patrols (I'm bleep -stirring now!)

The facts are that these devices were tested a few years back by the CSIRO for ACA. They ran comprehensive tests on these products and found that;

1) There was no difference at all to the fuels chemical or electromagnetic properties.

2) There was no measurable difference in performance on 4 different test engines, thre fuel injected and one a norm-asp diesel.

3) No credible scientific or statistical information was given by the manufacturers of these products.

4) All of these companies were in breach of the trade practices act and some had been in breach with trading standards over misleading advertising.

Two things that alarm me about these products..... First is the laws of which they continue to operate and the second are the dumb f*cks that buy them thinking they are getting better performance - All they do is give these people money to continue operating.
AnswerID: 32932

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