Corrimal Campervans

Submitted: Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 19:20
ThreadID: 76862 Views:3394 Replies:6 FollowUps:6
This Thread has been Archived
Hi everybody,
We have a Jayco Flamingo off rd, 18 months old done one main trip in it up to ,Oodnadatta around Lake Eyre to Birdsville down Coongee Lake, then a winding trip back to Nowra N.S.W. When we got back the repairs we had to have done was so disheartening, we are reluctant to use it for our next trip in June across the Tanami to the Bungle Bungles up to Darwin and beyond. Lately we have been looking at a Corrimal Camper van, and like the look of it, has anyone got one, used one or have any comparisons? we would like to know. Also does anyone know anything about the Selecta Diesel Transfer Tanks? looks like they might be a better solution than fitting a extra tank underneath any one tried one?

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Motherhen - Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 19:48

Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 19:48
Hi Terry

Where do want to carry the spare fuel tank? Ours travels on the ute tray. We purchased a fuel tank from the http://www.dolium.com.au/view?command=cman_view_webpage&action=view&webpage_id=111&pkey=dolium range through Opposite Lock store. We had it plumbed into the fuel line, so it can be emptied directly into the fuel tank or alternatively the vehicle can run directly from this auxiliary tank, as our main reason for the spare was in case the main fuel tank got damaged.

Regarding campers, having been on the Tanami i would not take anything other than a dedicated sturdy rough road camper on it.

If you mean Coromal camper, bear in mind that they are not warrantied for this type of road.

Extract from Coromal website: "The Pioneer range is designed to travel on and off sealed roads. They are not however designed to travel over all terrain. Travelling over rough, rocky, jagged, pinnacled or pot holed surfaces may amount to misuse or driver neglect. Any damage occurring as a result is excluded from the manufacturers warranty. Common sense should prevail in those conditions."

A number of manufacturers who produce a model labelled off road have similar disclaimers.

Motherhen
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 408820

Reply By: Tenpounder (SA) - Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 20:12

Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 20:12
Hi. I just checked on the Jayco website. There's no mention of a Flamingo off road unit. They do mention the Flamingo Outback. They say "With Jayco’s Outback range you can now venture throughout Australia’s vast network of unsealed roads", which, of course, has nothing to do with off road use. And I'm not sure how we'd all rate the Oodnadatta Track as an unsealed road? a track?
But. like others have said, there's plenty of disclaimers from the manufacturers about people intending to use off bitumen RVs for off road use - the upshot being if you do, you're on your own.
I've looked, and there's nothing on the Coromal website that suggests they market even their Pioneer range as off road.
Perhaps that's why units like the Ultimate hit the market at close to $60k. And perhaps that's why people like me have $10k vans for the black top and tents for the interesting bits.
AnswerID: 408826

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 20:38

Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 20:38
Hi Chris

It seems Jayco changed the name of their range from Off Road to Outback. Mind you, i wouldn't take one on "Australia's vast network of outback roads"!

Even an Ultimate got wrecked on the track into Purnululu while we were there - they overturned it. The people camped next to us were one of the first on the scene.

The costs of recovery for a breakdown somewhere remote like the Tanami may be more than the cost of a cheaper camper.

Wise move using the tent for the rough bits. It saves a lot of wear and tear on any camper or caravan as every kilometre on those relentless corrugations does damage. However when doing a trip like the Tanami, it is thousands of kilometres by the black top to go back for the camper.

Cheers

Mh

Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 678800

Follow Up By: Member - Teege (NSW) - Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 07:23

Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 07:23
Motherhen
I don't remember Jayco ever badging anything "off road". The camper that I bought new in 2000 and had self destruct on me in 2004 was an "Outback" and I have never seen them badged anything else. In my experience it would take a massive error of judgment (or simply very poor driving skills) to roll an Ultimate camper. Or perhaps there is more to the story - run off the road by an idiot perhaps, who knows. In any event to draw the conclusion that it rolled because of some inherent defect in design or manufacture is drawing a fairly long bow. But then I guess you wouldn't know - only telling the story second hand.

teege
0
FollowupID: 678846

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 14:32

Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 14:32
Hi Teege


While there was an incident of a Jayco camper trailer coming to grief after being run off the road by an 'idiot', the driver of the Ultimate told our neighbours he 'suddenly hit a patch of bulldust'. Driving too fast for the conditions appears the most likely cause. We did not meet any bulldust on the mainly firm track, although there was a patch of sand in a wide straight section near the highway end. There has never been any suggestion that anything to do with the camper was at fault. Our neighbours said it looked badly damaged - another holiday ruined. One of the biggest risks on the mainly narrow Purnululu entry track is the person coming the other way. Most drivers of course take it sensibly - but like on the Gibb River Road, just a few don't.

Mh
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 678892

Reply By: Blaze (Berri) - Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 22:24

Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 22:24
Seen a few of the replies to your post Terry,

We own a Jayco Outback Eagle, and have done the Oodnadatta Track, Tanami, GRR, and Anne Beadell Highway along many rough tracks through the Flinders and the High Country.

I have to admit that I did spend a couple of weekend's replacing screws, nuts and bolts I thought were suspect, (small or non locking) but after this the only trouble we have had is loosing the side light on bushes on Googs Track.

After this snall tidy up, I have no problems towing on any outback road network, just run low tyre pressures and travel at speeds to suit. I have friends that own a Corrimal and in IMHO I don't believe they fare any better than the Jayco.

Cheers

AnswerID: 408846

Reply By: Gronk - Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 22:32

Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 22:32
I don't believe you will find a great deal of difference between a Jayco and Coromal as far as "offroad" ability goes....although I personally would rate the Coromal slightly ahead...

As far as the above post about an Ultimate ....( or any other "full" offroad camper goes ) it should go anywhere your 4x4 goes....and if it doesn't, then its not built "tough" enough !!!......cause if its built with proper suspension and not overloaded, then it should take the same ( or more ) punishment as the 4x4 !!!
AnswerID: 408847

Follow Up By: Blaze (Berri) - Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 23:09

Sunday, Mar 14, 2010 at 23:09
Hi Gronk, I dont dispute that Ultimates, T vans etc don't have great suspension. Their certainly isn't any issue with either the Jayco or Coromal suspension, they both share the same setup that has been on 4X4's such as most dual cab's and all 60 series toyotas etc and many other 4X4's. IMHO saying that trailing arm suspension with coil springs are so superior to leaf springs, is a little hard for me to except, sure they ride slightly smoother, but I have been away with trailing arm suspended so called "Full" offroad campers and had them fail when we had no problems.. Ido admit I through away my campers shockers and run now without them.

Now of course if you make comments about how jayco etc don't mount things properly and use wrong sized screws, could't agree further.. :-)


0
FollowupID: 678825

Reply By: Member - Terry W (NSW) - Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 11:00

Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 11:00
Thanks everyone for replying, firstly apologies for writing "off road camper van" I meant "Outback" and I think ours is one of those lemons, lost all lighting and rivets started falling out of the top door hinges second day out while still on the bitumen, and lots more problems as the trip went on, so we are a bit worried about this years trip. would rather bite the bullet and get something of better quality now, than put up with the troubles of last year again.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 408888

Reply By: jeep cherokee - Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 14:24

Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 14:24
Terry,we purchased a new F400 (off road) from Coromal after going back and forth at the camping show between the two displays.Overall we found the Coromal to be of a better design and more effort was put into the fixings etc.I feel Jayco are built to a price whereas Coromal are built to a standard, but everyone to their own.
I agree with the other correspondents that both the manufacturers do not claim their vans are dedicated 'off roaders' and this is definately where common sence comes into the picture.We intend to hit the road early next year on a trip around Aussie for however long it takes,and will do all the tracks mentioned, however we will also be taking it easy and driving to the conditions and where possible will be tenting it into the very hard to get to spots.
To date we have liked everything about the Coromal and have had some good trips in it.Very comfortable and loads of bench space which was lacking in the Jayco models we saw.
AnswerID: 408921

Follow Up By: AlanTH - Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 16:09

Monday, Mar 15, 2010 at 16:09
When we were looking at campers we found the Goldstream far better than either of the 2 makes mentioned here. The fixtures and fittings were better than the Jaycos and the wires for the wind up were thicker.
The finish inside the drawers and cupboards of the Coromal were very bad rough sawn wood with no attempt to smooth things off. I spoke to the salesman and he just shrugged and obviously couldn't have cared less. Why should he as they sell plenty regardless!
We also checked out Roadstar and the stitching on the canvas was coming apart on their forecourt.
"If you buy it we'll fix that" said the female salesperson but I politely declined her kind offer.
We went for the Goldstream and were very satisfied but admit we didn't take it over much rough ground.
Alan.
0
FollowupID: 678907

Follow Up By: Racey - Tuesday, Mar 16, 2010 at 08:35

Tuesday, Mar 16, 2010 at 08:35
I agree with AlanTH, regarding the Goldstream as a much better option to either the Junko or Coramal.

Cheers

Racey
0
FollowupID: 679013

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)