CSR Comparisons

Travelling the CSR this August - just wondering if anyone can make any general comparisons with corrugations and dune approaches to get a clearer picture in our head.

Corrugations - as bad or worse than Gunbarrel, eastern end of Anne Beadell, or Connie Sue Hwy? Realise it is the length of the CSR making the difference, but hopefullly the grade of horrogations isn't any worse?

Dunes - have noted everyone mentioning the angle of approach to the dunes changing direction. Is this at the bottom only, or on top? What is the comparison with dunes on Googs Track where there is a zigzag at the top of the dunes, in between encroaching vegetation, along with bad scalloping - (making for a very adventurous ride) ?

Thanks for any info.
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Reply By: Mick O - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 06:19

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 06:19
In the words of many an asian hawker I'd sum it up by saying

"Same same.......but different".

Corrugations are horrendus in many locations on the Canning and equal to some stretches on the Gunbarrell, only there are more of them on the Canning. The 30km north and 100 km south of Well 33 being a classic example. Again, the dunes on Googs are often much higher than the Canning and difficult in their own rights but the Canning has consistantly more dunes. The Googs dunes tended to have a lot straighter approaches as I recalled where as the Canning tends to twist and turn as you start the approach sapping momentum.

Haven't done the Anne Beadell since 06 but have heard the corrugations are constant and terrible. The Connie Sue corrugations are bad but only in isolated stretches. They differ from the canning in being much firmer with a solid rocky base where the Cannings are all sand based. Again, there are only a couple of 20 km stretches of corrugations o the Connie to deal with.

The video in these blogs may give you some idea of the both.

Canning pushing south to 38

Canning Corrugations around 33

Track Conditions 2009

Googs Track


Hope that heps.


Cheers Mick


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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 08:25

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 08:25
Can't offer comparisons, but second Mick's comments re track conditions around well 33. Looked roughly like this:Image Could Not Be Found

The approach to many of the dunes includes a sharp turn at the bottom that costs momentum. Less of an issue are turns at the top.

HTH

John
J and V
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 11:45

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 11:45
Oooops! Wrong photo, but you get the idea! Forgot to mention - the scollops on the CSR dunes are a worse problem than the corrugations - full body bouncing up and down limits speed/momentum. Real killers of springs.

John
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Follow Up By: Member - blue dog red dog (NSW - Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 10:27

Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 10:27
Thanks Mick,

Have read all your blogs, and your videos are great to watch, can't wait to get out there. Thanks for the effort of posting it all, so we can all enjoy the travels as if we were there too ! Thanks for your advice.
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Reply By: Member - Bucky - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 08:50

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 08:50
Try this thread No. 75796 most things will be answered there.

I am sure you will be given plenty of advice.
The main one to remember is to take your time, and do not kill your vehicle ... there is no need to.

With regards to the corrugations, Sth side of Well 33 are real ordinary, I did not think the Nth side were as bad. Mind you, they are fairly horrific, to say the least, but if you have done the East side of the Gunbarrell, then SWMBO recons that you are qualified to do the Canning, as we both recon the CSR is no worse.

Low tyre pressures (as explained in my posts from the recomended thread above)
Dune approach, is critical, and I found that being about 1 tyre width off the main approach, seemed to smooth over the bumpy bits, and take out that bounce.
The dunes are easily be approached, just go straight up them, and there is no need to use the "Jumbo Jet" run-ups, or our other favourite name was the "55 pound club" run-ups.
Some peeled to the left, some peeled to the right, but none were dangerous, and if you have low tyre pressures, then there is no need to fly up them, just hit the dune, with a little more than a waddle, and give it to the 4B, as you begin to rise..
For safety reasons lift your foot at the top.

Feel free to contact me, if you have any other concerns

Cheers
Bucky



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Reply By: Crackles - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 09:26

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 09:26
John & Vals pic of the corrugations pretty much sums up the worst of it but the vast majority has little or none at all.
The dunes however are nothing like Googs track. Googs is an easy drive even when the sand is soft & dry. The Canning dunes in general are bigger, have chopped up more due to the traffic & are far harder to get over due to the extra weight of the fuel & water you need to carry.
As the track zig zags between the dunes there are right angled turns to climb many of them & as Bucky has mentioned "Jumbo Jet" run-ups on some of the bigger ones. While most don't need the runups, when the sand is very soft those with heavily laden under powered cars may need to use them.
On the tops of the dunes there are also mutliple heads which can catch you out. After a dry hot blow the crests can be quite tricky with some steep side angles & direction changes.
The difficulty of the Canning changes each year. Prepare for the worst, pack as light as possible & have a great trip.
Cheers Craig............
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Reply By: Member - Megan and Kevin D (AC - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 09:37

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 09:37
Hi Blue Dog Red Dog!
Agree with all else said- and as suggested, corrugations are corrugations whether on the OTL to Cape York, the abandoned Gunbarrel or the CSR.

We try to deal with both the corrugations and sand dunes by keeping our tyres at 18lbs psi and driving slowly. At these pressures it's easy to crawl over sand dunes whether there's a bend at the bottom or top or not. There's no need for speed. This has worked for us in the Simpson and the CSR - sorry can't comment on the Googs until after May this year!

These tyre pressures allow the tyres to absorb the impact of corrugations and minimise damage to the vehicle, contents and passengers.

We manage in both situations by trying to do the following:

1. Treating our tyres as a consumable.
2. Sticking to 60k max at these pressures.
3. Camping early to stay refreshed.

Enjpy them!
Kevin
Image Could Not Be FoundPS Photo shows corrugations around Well 23!

AnswerID: 410445

Reply By: Member - Leigh (Vic) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 13:58

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 13:58
Perhaps we could muster a few retirees, a govt grant, fuel company sponsorship and a donated grader and do the job ourselves....not too swish though cos that'd attract a very different cohort not to mention increased traffic levels.
AnswerID: 410485

Follow Up By: Mick O - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 17:40

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 17:40
It wouldn't even take that Leigh. I reckon a set of chains with a few tyres on it. You get a volunteer to drag it behind their vehicle or a group to take in turns along the worst sections dropping it off at a given point. Someone else going the opposite direction drags it back. You could make it a provision of the permit system administered by the ANFWDA. A few sets along the worst areas and you'd soon have a much better track system.

I know that's a simplistic approach and doesn't take in the self interest of many of our fellow travellers but it's a simple, non-mechanical and cheap suggestion and all that would be needed to knock the top off many of the corrugations.

My thoughts.

Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Crackles - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 18:55

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 18:55
The Eyre Bird observitory does just that. They have a steel bar they drag up & down their sandy access track ensuring it never gets too chopped up. From memory there was a steel blade left out on the Canning at one point that was used to put the original track in. Not sure if it is still there?
Would be an excellent project for the WA 4x4 association to set up & could be funded by some of the money they charge for permits. ;-) As you say Mick if a grader blade or set of tyres was left in the worst sections anyone could tow them up or down. A sign at each end could let everyone know what the process is.
Cheers Craig.............
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Follow Up By: Member - Leigh (Vic) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 20:46

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 20:46
Hi Mick and Crackles. I'd have to agree with you guys on all accounts. Had heard of this being done years ago on the Canning with chains but the way it looks now I'm not sure I'd like to do the trip only to loose the rest of my fillings! LOL. Cheers, Leigh
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Reply By: Member - Tony (ACT) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 14:02

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 14:02
The track south of 23 is starting to corrugate almost as bad as around 33, or will in a year or so. Driven to fast and most suspensions will give out.

I have only travelled from north to south, and the approach to the dunes is a lot smoother than the other way, south to north. But still the odd sharp turn before the final approach. This way the bad scalloping is on the down hill side, which still needs to be taken really slow.
AnswerID: 410486

Reply By: Member - RICHARD K D (NSW) - Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 16:09

Friday, Mar 26, 2010 at 16:09
We found the corrugations quite bad to & from well 33, with regards to the dunes we found the best approach to be to stop at the bottom,select 1st gear with tyre pressure's set at about 20psi & with reasonable light throttle opening we had no trouble. We did the CSR in June 09
AnswerID: 410503

Reply By: Member - blue dog red dog (NSW - Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 10:23

Saturday, Mar 27, 2010 at 10:23
Thanks a lot everyone for the feedback. This just puts a better picture in our head of what to expect in general. We are really looking forward to our trip! Have given ourselves 3 weeks to do the CSR alone - total of 6 weeks driving from Sydney - so we can take our time and just enjoy it. Can't wait :)
AnswerID: 410631

Follow Up By: Member - Bucky - Thursday, Apr 01, 2010 at 14:34

Thursday, Apr 01, 2010 at 14:34
3 weeks is heaps of time.
I think we did it in 14 or 15 days, all up, and did not seem to be pushing it. Certainly no speed, as the main aim was to get home with as little colateral damage as possible..

Colateral damage being the damage you must have, just by beiing there.
Cheers
Bucky
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