Load ratings on roof racks

Submitted: Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 08:34
ThreadID: 77442 Views:4628 Replies:8 FollowUps:15
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I was down at Midalia steel collecting some bits and pieces and when it came to loading this gear on my roof rack I was asked if I had a load rating stamp for my roof rack.

Apparently their 'safety officer' has told all staff not to load any cars without approriate load ratings.

They already have a ruling of not loading over length steel on roof racks - a very good idea. And even not allowing a customer to overload their car is a very good idea.

But making customers have engineered load ratings to roof racks is going to be a bit hard to meet. It would be cheaper to go to another steel place than pay for that kind of engineering.

Just another part of society passing the buck to someone else. I feel sorry for engineers as their insurance is just going to sky-rocket as everything will need an engineer's certificate.

David



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Reply By: DIO - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 09:25

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 09:25
This post has been read by the moderation team and has been moderated due to a breach of The Personal Attacks Rule .

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Reply By: Member - TJ (VIC) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 09:54

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 09:54
Hi Serendipity, I've just been out to see if my roof rack has any info plates or stamps on it and I've come up empty handed. Thanks for asking this question as I don't usually carry probably more than 50kg's up top but I am now wondering how heavy I can go if need be. Never be too embarrassed by asking such questions as it is educational for other members. Thanks for asking. Happy Easter. :-).

TJ...
AnswerID: 411585

Follow Up By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:08

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:08
Hi TJ

Thanks. I thought is was important for members to be aware of this.

I always believe the only stupid questions are the ones not asked.

David


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Reply By: OzTroopy - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:13

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:13
Those near useless factory fitted racks have a load spec in the owners manual normally.

Many suggest not to carry sheets of timber etc ... as air pressure can rip the lot out of the mounts.

Mostly suited for bicycles and snow ski sets imho.

Aftermarket racks are all load rated ... but be aware a rack rated for a load may not carry the same load when just screwed to the roof panel.

Gutter mounts or better still ..... old 40 series external barwork setups are load carriers.

Lots of nanny state rules being applied in regards to "safety" ..... saves educating the public ... BACK to the commonsense levels they once had ....
AnswerID: 411586

Follow Up By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:25

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:25
Re carrying sheets on top of a roof rack, I had to smile a while back, observing a car leaving Bunnings, which had stopped because the sheets they had loaded onto the roof rack had shifted, with a couple laying on the ground. They had neglected to tie them down - they were just sitting on top!
Not sure if they had hoped they'd get home without tying them down, or had just forgotten to do it. Suppose I shouldn't have felt so smug about it all - he looked pretty glum.
Gerry
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:33

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:33
Perhaps his instructions didnt include "Tie all loads down"

Because it didnt say to he didnt do it


LOL


You cant legislate for idiots can you.

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FollowupID: 681626

Follow Up By: Member - joc45 (WA) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:58

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 10:58
Not as silly as it sounds!
To cover their asses, so many products seem to carry the most obvious, but silly instructions.
Perhaps there's a good reason!
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FollowupID: 681629

Follow Up By: al - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 11:42

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 11:42
when i worked in the states a few years ago i was issued with a ladder that was covered in warning stickers by the manufacturer (fear of being sued) but one that stood out was do not stand ladder on frozen manure or dung it may soften while you are on ladder and may fall.
it makes you wonder where it will all stop.
Al
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FollowupID: 681639

Follow Up By: Member - Jeremy W (SA) - Monday, Apr 05, 2010 at 08:16

Monday, Apr 05, 2010 at 08:16
I can understand the concerns. One cannot guess how the racks will be used after they have been installed. Manufacturers' ratings leave much to be desired. A commonly used "industrial" type rack is manufactured by KRS and is mainly exported to Europe - check out the spec on this one.

Jeremy.
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FollowupID: 681701

Reply By: Member - DAZA (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 11:34

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 11:34
Hi All

I would me more concerned re: how and what they use to tie things down with, being in the plumbing game I have seen plumbers tie their ladders on with Ocky Straps and then put a bundle of 6 metre lengths of pvc sewer pipe on the ladder and tie that down with Duct Tape, more good luck than good management that they have had no bad accidents.

And a Happy Easter to All.


Cheers
AnswerID: 411597

Reply By: Ozhumvee - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 12:40

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 12:40
Daza
There is absolutely nothing wrong with duct tape or "Lebbo rope" as the tradies call it.
For light loads with little windage like plastic pipe etc it works well, doesn't slip, bloody hard to break and is easily cut off when unloading.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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AnswerID: 411610

Follow Up By: Member - DAZA (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 19:07

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 19:07
Yeh I'm talking about a minimum of 4 x 6mtr lenghts of 150mm sewer pipe on the ladders, duct tape is ok it's the flimsy Ocy Straps that hold all the weight of ladder and pipes, it's not as light as you think.

Cheers
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FollowupID: 681670

Reply By: bennyzbit - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 12:57

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 12:57
On the subject of overloading roof racks with steel or whatever and wondering about the carrying capacity of your rack.

We bought a Patrol with an after market heavy duty roof rack. The rack fits into the roof drainage channels on either side with a continuous male strip.

In a moment of creative stupidity I devised a roof top sleep platform and cover ( has a roof top tent already been invented ?) BUT thought twice about it as I weigh 120kg and Mrs about 65kg. How comfy would the vehicle feel about such loading even whilst stationary?

Benny
AnswerID: 411613

Follow Up By: chisel - Monday, Apr 05, 2010 at 10:54

Monday, Apr 05, 2010 at 10:54
Plenty of roof top tents out there. The ~200kgs will be fine while stationary.
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FollowupID: 681714

Reply By: Member - Old Girl (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 13:01

Sunday, Apr 04, 2010 at 13:01
Some plumbers don't seem to tie them on at all. Ran up the back of a ute that stopped suddenly in front of us. Just a little nudge. It was the ladder that did the damage. It went through the rear window of the Tarago in front of him.
AnswerID: 411614

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, Apr 06, 2010 at 19:07

Tuesday, Apr 06, 2010 at 19:07
David, pay for the steel and get a mate to help walk the lengths of steel down to your car parked about 100 metres away!!! Simple... Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

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AnswerID: 411862

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