Oil cans. Drawers for the use of - advice needed

Submitted: Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 07:26
ThreadID: 77915 Views:2880 Replies:8 FollowUps:12
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I was having a contemplative moment last night while dinner was cooking.

I was going to make some more plywood drawers for the camper, so there I was looking at an empty 4 litre Oive oil can and thought "that'll do nicely". even comes with a ready made handle.

After all this principle was used with kero tins for a long time in the bush.

I thought I'd cut one side out with a nibler, so far so good.

Question is what do you do with the now cut and sharp edges to make the neatest job of it.

I assume you'd be best to fold it some way, I can do this with multi grips but it sure isn't going to be pretty and will take most of the tinning off and cause rust.

Is there a better way?

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Reply By: Member - Oldplodder (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 07:40

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 07:40
I would put some old fuel hose or vacuum hose around the edge.
Slit the hose with a knife along it's length.
(Thats assuming you don't throw old fuel hose away in case it might be useful, even with a crack or two :O))

Me, a scrounger, never. And my middle name is not Steptoe.
AnswerID: 413863

Follow Up By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 07:47

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 07:47
Yes I do keep stuff!!!!!! I mean who doesn't?

In the same line of thinking, I had thought to use pinchweld that the motor trimmers use the trouble is keeping it on when it's used as a drawer, the metal is pretty thin.
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Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 08:01

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 08:01
The pinchweld stuff can be squashed a little more to make it grip a single thickness, you can aslo put silicon or contact in it before putting it on which will stick it on. There is a smaller thinner version as well but very hard to find, some caravan supplies places have it or just use a U rubber section from Clark rubber.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 18:28

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 18:28
Yep, agree with Peter pinchweld is the stuff and the smaller size is available from mobs that supply to the motor body builders. Here in WA a company called (I think) Universal Engineers or Universal Supplies do it. Not sure if they are Oz wide though. Maybe check out these suppliers where you are.

Cheers
Pop
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Reply By: Member - barry F (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 08:28

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 08:28
I have used electrical heat shrink in a similar situation. I slit it as suggested above as you would a piece of hose & then shrunk it in position. It stays in place on my application but then again the material I covered is just a little bit thicker than what you are talking about. Cheers
AnswerID: 413870

Reply By: vk1dx - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 09:06

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 09:06
Use some thin grommet strip. Its like a tube split down the middle and the better varieties have a ridge shaped interior that will grip the tin edge.

AnswerID: 413879

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 09:10

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 09:10
Forgot a link: From Farnell

I could not find it at Jaycar but they may call it something else. Thin plastic tubing can also do the job. I suggest you also clean all the oil out before trying to glue the tubing or grommet strip in place. Maybe super glue. Not trying to tell you to suck eggs as far as the cleaning goes. Okay

Phil
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Reply By: Member - Duncs - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 09:10

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 09:10
Ok I am just thinking out loud here so this may not work.

You would need to use a small diametre hose for it not to look overdone on a 4l tin.

What if you split the hose as suggested and then fill it with an acid free silicone before putting it in place. Properly cleaned off this would stay long after the oil can had worn out elsewhere.

Like I say just thinking out loud. It may be overly painful to make it neat and clean but it would stay in place.

Duncs
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 10:23

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 10:23
Just buy some small pinchweld from Clark Rubber or Ovesco on line. Looks professional then and is less likely to fall off.
Ovesco link.
AnswerID: 413883

Follow Up By: sweetwill - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 16:49

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 16:49
mate
like Phil has said pinch pleat from Clark rubber all different sizes available end of story cheers bill.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 10:13

Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 10:13
Thats the stuff.
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Reply By: B1B2 - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 11:13

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 11:13
G'day Gone troppo,
You were obviously too young to do sheet metal work at Qld schools - I wasn't.
Two ways to improve the sharp edge, one you can cut a slit in each corner about 12mm and then fold it over. There were adapters we put in an anvil to do this, a brickies bolster or wide chisel in a vice would help to fold it.
If you want to improve the strength of the opening run a wire around the top and fold the 12mm piece over the wire. Have a look at a bread tin in any cooking shop that's why they are so strong.
They were good schools in the late 50's.

Cheers,
Bill
AnswerID: 413886

Follow Up By: Fred G NSW - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 11:34

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 11:34
Bill, I may gone to the same school LOL.... :-)

Fred.
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Follow Up By: Member - Shakey (QLD) - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 19:09

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 19:09
I've still got a couple of cake tins in use from metalwork class at school. They'd be pushing thirty years old now. Quality stuff!!!
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Follow Up By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 07:55

Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 07:55
Bill, thanks for that advice. I went to school in the late 60's maybe not as good as the 50's but likely better that what you get today!!!

How to turn the stuff is what I was getting at, never thought of the brickies bolster. (Now I have to go and root it out from wherever it was put a couple of years ago the last time it was used)

I assume you put the bolster in a vice, lay the edge to be folded over it and tap it with a hammer. Is that right?

Also is it feasible to put solder over any bits where the tin (or whatever they use now) has been scratched? I don't want to paint it, kind of spoils the look, but I have to keep the rust away ( I live in the wet tropics)

Like the wire idea but I might have a go at a few plain first till I get the hang of it.

Thanks again
Chris
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 09:37

Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 09:37
To get a really clean fold the total length in one step make up a timber slip ,
3" wide and 1/2" thick pine works well , with your table saw cut a 1/2" groove 3/8"in leaving a groove as in tongue and groove floorboards ,
chamfer the 3/8" side of the groove to leave 1/8" at top and full thickness at bottom of groove ,
Place timber slip groove over tin to be folded , one quick twist of the wrist in wards and a perfect 3/4 of a circle tube , easy as with a bit of practise.
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Follow Up By: Member - Russnic [NZ] - Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 10:21

Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 10:21
Guys that brings me back to my sheet metal classes in the first year at Southland Technical College.One period a week sheet metal ,one period wood, and so on for the first year, I was going to do Ag anyway but that info back then is still applicable.
Have family that are Medical Drs. Geologist's, Accountants but the good basics in trades skills are real good to have. I do still like to be asked (DAD CAN YOU HELP/FIX THIS).
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Reply By: Motherhen - Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 17:46

Thursday, Apr 22, 2010 at 17:46
What about using a plastic can instead? Edges can be ground smooth, and drawer woild be light weight.

Motherhen
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

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AnswerID: 413925

Follow Up By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 08:00

Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 08:00
aaaw come on you're being too practical.

What's the point of taking the easy option when there is a more difficult and more time consuming choice. :-)

Seriously though I want to get that "traditional quality recycling" look. We use 20l plastic drums with side cut out for all sorts of stuff in the shed works a treat, but plastic is not for this job.



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FollowupID: 684208

Reply By: GoneTroppo Member (FNQ) - Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 08:06

Friday, Apr 23, 2010 at 08:06
Thanks everyone for your suggestions, I must admit I didn't realise pinchweld came in anything other than the 15mm wide stuff.

First up I'm going to try Bill's folding trick, if that works I'll post some pics. If not I'm off to Clark Rubber or another industrial rubber place in Cairns to see what I can find.

Always amazes me how much usefull stuff comes out of this forum even on obscure questions!

Thanks again.
AnswerID: 413984

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