on the road weights being checked ?????

Submitted: Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:14
ThreadID: 78169 Views:4509 Replies:16 FollowUps:22
This Thread has been Archived
How often are caravans stopped or waved into weighing stations to have their towing weights checked
warren aka aussichef
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:23

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:23
Warren

as a heavy vehicle driver i have never seen (others may have) any c'vans wheeled in for a weight check.they seem to over look these as more revenue is raised the more tyres you have.ie trucks.

be interesting to hear of any one who has,cheers.

AnswerID: 415113

Follow Up By: Rockape - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:17

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:17
Warre,

as a very X heavy vehicle driver, as Mark said, the only time I have seen them pulled up is for licence or breath tests.

Have heard whispers that van checks were going to be carried out, although that was about a year ago. Maybe they are getting plenty of tax dollars elsewhere.

If they do crack down, they are going to make some big bucks.

Have a good one
0
FollowupID: 685295

Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 23:22

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 23:22
Warren,
I have seen them pulled in at Murray Bridge SA, But it was about 6years ago when I did Syd/Adel run and only at holiday time.
GU RULES!!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 685339

Reply By: Member - Michael P (QLD) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:32

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:32
Warren,
Have had caravans since 1971, done many k's throught most of Aus never stopped or looked like getting stopped.
Had boats since before that checked 5 times 1x Evans Heads 1x Hervey Bay 3 x Manly all at boat ramps.
Mike.
AnswerID: 415114

Reply By: Fab72 - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:46

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:46
Come to think of it, I don't see many weigh bridges open at all anymore. I travel lots of rural roads in SA every year for work, even the Port Wakefield one never seems open anymore. This used to be one of the busiest apart from the one near Bolivar.

Maybe the Mermaids have had their budgets cut.
AnswerID: 415115

Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:06

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:06
Afternoon Fab72,
NSW is a different matter.
I personally don't drive a heavy vehicle, but believe me in NSW you are treated like a criminal if you drive one.
I do also believe that there are a hell of a lot of over weight caravans, trailers and passenger vehicles getting about on the road network.
I don't understand why vehicle/caravan combo's are checked as much as heavy vehicles are.
They should be.

0
FollowupID: 685292

Reply By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:49

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 16:49
I never have seen or heard of a caravan being pulled over for weigh, however, if you decide to have a major accident (your fault or not), the first thing they will proberly do is weigh the rig, THEN, intresting times ahead, once insurance companys become invovled.

Shane
AnswerID: 415116

Follow Up By: Jenny M - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:56

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:56
We did ask a reputable caravan repair man here in WA who has repaired many vans that were covered by insurance and he said not once had he been questioned bu insurance companies about weights or suspicions of overloading.
My advice is to ignore the stated weight on the compliance plate and run it over a weigh bridge - even totally empty will almost always be heavier than stated
0
FollowupID: 685298

Follow Up By: Jenny M - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:00

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:00
We did ask a reputable caravan repair man here in WA who has repaired many vans that were covered by insurance and he said not once had he been questioned by insurance companies about weights or suspicions of overloading.
My advice is to ignore the stated weight on the compliance plate and run it over a weigh bridge - even totally empty will almost always be heavier than stated
0
FollowupID: 685299

Follow Up By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:42

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:42
Hi Jenny,
Here is a report, done in '06.
It's quite lengthy, but gives good insight on what happens IF things go wrong.
They didn't weigh the van, but admit they should of.
This link has been posted here before, regarding the inquest into the triple fatality involving the Jong family in SA, It was never concluded that overall weight was what caused this accident, however, weight distribution may of been a key player.Jong inquest - SA coroners findings.
Shane
0
FollowupID: 685304

Follow Up By: Baz&Pud (Tassie) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:55

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:55
Some one above made the comment that when they do start pulling up and weighing vans they will make big $$$.
Have to agree, when on the Mainland last year saw dozens of vans that looked far to heavy for the towing vehicle.
EXAMPLE: Ford Falcon Utility pulling a Bushtracker.
Baz
Go caravaning, life is so much shorter than death.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 685307

Reply By: Member - mazcan - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:08

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:08
hi aussie chief
i have never heard of it happening in wa but wish it would

as i've seen some extremely overloaded rigs cars and 4wds towing
caravans/trailers/ and/or boats/

and boats that appear to be used as trailers loaded to the hilt with all sorts of camping gear etc

some rigs with boats up on roof racks as well as vans/trailers behind
and traveling at 110km instead of the legal limit 100km/per hr towing limit
in w.a and not using wdh devices either and a lot of eastern states plates as well not only w.a reg's

i also know that the speed detectors used do not differentiate between a vehicle with a van /trailer /boat behind and one without

but in 2005 i was stopped just east of norseman while towing my current small camper trailer by eucla police they where going the other way and got me on there incar radar detector and spung around and came after me

as i have followed to many to mention through speed traps multi nova's while towing what ever at 110 and they never get flashed or stopped by hand held radar roadside police either and yet they are 10km's over the towing legal speed of 100km's for all w.a roads
so there is still big loop holes in this so called modern technology and the way they are administered by the road traffic police
this is my observations of the topic
cheers
AnswerID: 415120

Reply By: Allan B, Sunshine Coast, - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:30

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 17:30
The relevant State transport authorities do have mobile inspectors on the roads although I don't see them all that often. These inspectors carry portable load-cell weighing instruments that weigh one axle at a time. I would think that they would only be interested in trucks, but you never know! They may well take an interest in those occasional rigs where the driver can hardly see over the front of the bonnet.

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 415124

Reply By: Member - barry F (NSW) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:28

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 18:28
Never! And it's frightening! As already said, there are heaps of overloaded vans & vehicles on the road & the authorities don't seem to care. We had an accident with our van a few years back, the insurance company came to the party, but never bothered to check weights, just paid up & I think that has to be irresponsible.

I also think that the ignorance of some van owners is more than a bit worrying. Only this Arvo my wife & I went for a walk out by the Lake & we spotted a rather smart looking Holden & got talking to the owners. The bloke told us it was 12 months old & had a 2 Litre turbo diesel & that they towed a 16 foot caravan with it & were very happy with it's performance.

He then went on to say that the vehicle was rated to be able to tow 1200 Kg. which was about the Tare weight of the van & he realised that the loaded weight would be much more.They "overcame" the problem by fitting a Hayman Reece WDH.

The Sad (read dangerous) part is that they both firmly believed that a weight distribution kit increased the towing ( weight) capacity of the vehicle.

I firmly believe that every time you are heading down the road & you see a vehicle with a caravan in tow heading your way, you ought to be a bit nervous. There will be a good chance that the rig is overloaded, no WDH & the person behind the wheel has not had much experience or training in towing a heavy & long vehicle. The only qualification to tow a 26 footer (or any van ) is whether or not you have the dollars to buy it. If that is not stupid, what is?

So, I'll get off my soap box now & crawl back in my kennel & behave! Hoo Roo
AnswerID: 415129

Follow Up By: Member - shane (SA) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:39

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:39
Hi Barry, firstly I agree you should not overload any vehicle but I disagree with these vehicles are easy to spot. A novice can load a vehicle and it can look overloaded but be under but an experienced person can easily hide the fact that there vehicle is overloaded. BOTH are dangerous.

One of my pet hates is people going on about WDH, I have been towing for 35 years with and without WDH's and I personally dont like them. And as I have only driven Nissans for the last 25 years, Nissan dont recommend the use of WDH's with there OE tow bars.


cheers shane.
0
FollowupID: 685313

Follow Up By: Member - Don M- Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:55

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:55
Well that just about says it all. Someone who has been towing for 35 years and still doesn't understand what a WDH does.

And Shane, just because Nissan says it doesn't recommend use of a WDH with their tow bar, doesn't mean it isn't necessary and, if you have more than around 120kg on your tow ball (TBM) then you need to transfer some of that weight back to the front wheels and neither Nissan or any other make has been clever enough to do that yet without the use of a WDH.

It may be your pet hate Shane, but you haven't learnt much in 35 years apparently.
0
FollowupID: 685318

Follow Up By: Member - shane (SA) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 20:35

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 20:35
Hi Don, I said

I have been towing for 35 years WITH and WITHOUT WDH's and I personally dont like them.

I mainly tow trailers of 3-3.5 tonnes with tandem axle and when laoded properly
a WDH in my opinion makes no difference.
And I would go as far as to say I have never had a crash with the trailer on.

cheers. Shane.
0
FollowupID: 685323

Follow Up By: Member - shane (SA) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 20:37

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 20:37
Sorry that should have been Loaded, not laoded
0
FollowupID: 685324

Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 20:06

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 20:06
i have to agree with Shane here.
i used to race in motor sport and had my race car sitting on my car trailer that was made with NO springs (solid axle). it was all about "balance" with the car on the trailer. move it 1 inch forward and it would handle like a pig,move it back again and it would tow at any speed great.
0
FollowupID: 685434

Reply By: bgreeni - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:19

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:19
I think the big difference is in the damage that is done to the road. An overloaded van, while dangerous, will not be likely to impose excessive loads on the pavement or bridges, while a truck will. That is the major reason for the scalies checking weights.
AnswerID: 415136

Reply By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:30

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 19:30
This was in Brisbane,

Image Could Not Be Found

Shane
AnswerID: 415138

Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 07:02

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 07:02
Hi Shane,
Doesn't look like the tow vehicle has much suspension left in it.
It appears to be a late model Falcon.
If it's been fitted with - heavy duty Towpack 2300kg(inc. towbar, towball, trailer wiring & load levelling kit) Not that it looks like it is doing any good.
If not it would be a standard Towpack - 1600kg (inc. towbar, towball & trailer wiring)
You'd be just waiting for it to get the tank slappers happening.

Safe travels mate.





0
FollowupID: 685352

Follow Up By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 13:08

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 13:08
howyagoin Jon,
That Bronco gotta be at least 2000Kg by itself, let alone a "hired from a servo"
car trialer with a big headboard 5-600kg,
WDH?
brakes, on a renta??.
Shane
0
FollowupID: 685377

Follow Up By: ob - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 18:15

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 18:15
Is it just my aging eyes or does the trailers RH rear wheel look like it is doing a Charlie Chaplin immitation ??????????
0
FollowupID: 685414

Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 18:21

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 18:21
ob

i think its just blurred vision because of something on Shanes window.it would have a fair bit of weight on those wheels but.
0
FollowupID: 685417

Follow Up By: Tonyfish#58 - Tuesday, May 04, 2010 at 18:50

Tuesday, May 04, 2010 at 18:50
Ob - Yes when you blow it up the dirty windscreen is the culprit


Image Could Not Be Found


0
FollowupID: 685509

Reply By: uneekwahn - Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 20:08

Sunday, May 02, 2010 at 20:08
My folks, particularly my dad, is VERY anal when it comes to making sure he's not going over weight etc.

So much so that my wife and I were the recipients of their cobb oven due to the folks trying to "cut down on weight" in the caravan!

fingers crossed he thinks the generator and new engel are too heavy soon too! ;)

jason.
AnswerID: 415141

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 07:27

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 07:27
Hi Warren,

Wouldn't happen is South Australia mate.
I have never seen a weighing Station opened:-)

Not on weekends or public holidays at least.


Bill.
Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 415172

Reply By: Road Warrior - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 10:41

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 10:41
I've never seen it happen in Wait Awhile

But I've "heard" of the coppers planning to do holiday maker weight checks for a while now.

Also I note the new Forrest Highway has a large pull-in bay marked as vehicle inspection stations etc

AnswerID: 415196

Reply By: cycadcenter - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 11:23

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 11:23
Twice I have seen caravans pulled over at the inspection area on the Bruce Hwy at Maryborough. Not too sure if they were weighing them but they looked way overloaded with a tinny on top of the 4WD.

They looked as though they were off to the Cape or gulf Fishing.

Bruce
AnswerID: 415202

Reply By: D200Dug- Monday, May 03, 2010 at 18:54

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 18:54
Fixed weigh-bridges have been closed and mermaids now prefer to use portable units to check suspect vehicles. On a few trips in Queensland over holiday periods police and main roads have had total roadblocks on major highways checking every vehicle coming past.

I would imagine if something did not look right they would have it run over the scales pretty quickly.

I think this is a great idea to get dangerous drivers and vehicles off the roads.
AnswerID: 415245

Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 19:15

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 19:15
D200Dug

here in NSW we have the RTA Inspectors man the fixed weigh bridges ( which i might add, they seem to have an endless amount of money to spend on new ones and NOT more rest areas) and the local Weights and Measurements Inspectors have the individual axle weight portable scales.
the RTA inspectors only seem to be interested in log book and licence details these days.
0
FollowupID: 685425

Follow Up By: D200Dug- Monday, May 03, 2010 at 19:20

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 19:20
Yep this was in Queensland and I have only seen it in Queensland.

but I get the feeling that it is being trialed and if successful other states will also do it.

It had a really good strike rare for picking up all sorts of crimes and defect vehicles.

They had drug squad, vehicle inspectors, breathalyzers and lots of what would normally be office staff police out doing the real job :-)
0
FollowupID: 685426

Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 20:22

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 20:22
D200Dug

they have those blitz's down here regularly.
drug dogs,drug tests,log books,licence checks,RBT,RTA inspections and all the bells and whistles.it usually happens after a few accidents so it makes them look like they are on the case on the road toll.
once pulled over you can expect to be there for hours and made sit in a little roped off area so you look like a criminal.
nothing to fear if you have nothing to hide is what i think but its just another hold up to us trying to make a mile,cheers.
0
FollowupID: 685439

Follow Up By: D200Dug- Monday, May 03, 2010 at 20:28

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 20:28
We have been through a few up north and usually find someone to chat with while waiting.

I would rather wait than share the road with dangerously impaired drivers or vehicles :-)
0
FollowupID: 685441

Reply By: Gazal Champion - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 19:13

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 19:13
Talking about overloading and a lack of experience.

I was coming through the checkout in Big W (Kempsey) about 2 years ago and a woman in her 60s was going through before me with some tools. Shifter, screw drivers, crappy pliers etc. etc..

I said to her "Looks like someone is going to do some maintenance?"

She replied " No, I'm going to tour around Aus. in the new 5th wheeler I just bought".

As she didn't look the type, whatever that is?, I said I guess that is a bit of a handful ?.

She said "Oh no it was alright, I took it for a run around the block and it went well. And you know I have never so much as towed a box trailer in my life."

I thought Chr1st someone is going to be lucky to survive if she gets into trouble driving down the road.

Can you believe it!. One of these days they will bring in special tests for towing caravans and 5th wheelers.

True story.
Cheers Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 415247

Follow Up By: Dave(NSW) - Monday, May 03, 2010 at 23:28

Monday, May 03, 2010 at 23:28
I thought Chr1st someone is going to be lucky to survive if she gets into trouble driving down the road.

Can you believe it!. One of these days they will bring in special tests for towing caravans and 5th wheelers.

Can't happen quick enough in my opinion.
Cheers Dave..
GU RULES!!

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 685456

Reply By: Member - Beatit (QLD) - Tuesday, May 04, 2010 at 14:24

Tuesday, May 04, 2010 at 14:24
This is a pleasing change of focus on towing vans. Mostly it is about slow vans blocking the road for others. It's good to see that contributors are concerned and as a van tower testing the limits myself I reckon it is absolutely essential that I know the weights I'm dealing with in respect of my van, my car, my combination and what towing aids are required such as WDH's and mirrors. I know that I have a large load and need extra distances to stop etc. I also exercise consideration when I drive allowing traffic to get past etc but there is a ratbag element on the road and they don't change wether they drive a car,bike, truck or van. Nothing is more annoying then someone that needs to get past and slow you down on the next possible hill.

Sorry Warren - I didn't mean to hijack your thread

Kind regards
AnswerID: 415337

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)