Engine Saver

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:09
ThreadID: 79750 Views:4147 Replies:5 FollowUps:27
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In 2007 I put an engine saver into the cruiser, for a few months now the buzzer has been erratic,which I thought might have been a bad join, so I rang David the MD of the company,He is a very helpful fellla, after a ten minute or so chat he decided the unit was R.S and insisted he replace it free of charge,The new one was on my doorstep in 2 days.Now that is great service,from an Aussie owned company only too happy to please thier customer.He gets my business any time.
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Reply By: Member - Rodney B- Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:26

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:26
Haven't had the unit fail but I found the enthusiasm of David and his help with the install worth a million bucks. Love the unit and pleased with the sensitivity of the unit (I have the overheat attachment as well). Took a little fiddling to get the heat range right but I now set the indicator at a different level when in the high counrty as opposed to driving around town.

Cheers Rod
AnswerID: 422573

Reply By: D200Dug- Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:49

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:49
I have one and have had no problems at all. ( touch wood )

The service and advice I got from the company was excellent.
AnswerID: 422575

Follow Up By: D200Dug- Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:51

Wednesday, Jun 30, 2010 at 12:51
I also enjoy glancing down and seeing what my engine temp is really up to :-)

The supplied temp gauge sits on normal while the watchdog goes up and down depending on the load and conditions.
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Reply By: Member - Tony H (touring oz) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 01:21

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 01:21
Hi all,
I also wish to give David a pat on the back, I purchased a kit for my new 200 series, all good, worked well for a period, then started to act eraticly. I just happened to be in the Ingham area made contact with David, he suggested that I bring my vehicle around to his home where he tested it, established that there was a problem with the unit. Fifteen minutes later he had fitted a new module, from that day to this the unit has worked perfectly. I got the feeling when talking & watching him working on my 200 series he is passionate & very interested in his product. Keep up the great work.

Usual disclaimer.....I have no affiliation with his company
Insanity doesnt run in my family.... it gallops!

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Reply By: vk1dx - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 06:47

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 06:47
What do you mean by an "engine saver"?

Phil
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Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 07:50

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 07:50
Enginesaver
A handy piece of equipment to have.
Just order mine yesterday,
Been meaning to get one for a couple of years now, finally got around to ordering it.
Should have it tomorrow, if not Monday is fine.

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 09:22

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 09:22
Thanks but no thanks

Another gimmick. Just like all the other meters people install. Please you go ahead by all means but not for us.

Whats wrong with looking down every 30 seconds or so at the gauges that are already in the car. We do. You will soon see if the temperature is rising.

This one reminds me of those who have to have tyre pressure monitors in the car as well.

Phil
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FollowupID: 693041

Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 09:50

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 09:50
Phil

"
Whats wrong with looking down every 30 seconds or so at the gauges that are already in the car. We do. You will soon see if the temperature is rising. "

the thing is Phil that this system will alert you to when your cooling system has a problem. well lets say that you have been out driving the day b4 and you go to get into your car and you start it and unbeknowns to you that you have a hole in your radiator.........your cars original temp gauge is absolutely useless until its too late.

the monitor has a self test function can be tested regularly in order to see if it is working properly.
of course its up to those who wish to install one your correct ......i just see it as cheap insurance to my 4wd,cheers.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:07

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:07
I would have found the level low at the morning checkup. I don't just look at the coolant reservoir. I check the radiator as well. Oil levels and get under and look for any new oily areas and get the grass out. Even a small bleed of the fuel filter. Its not used back home so this only gets done in the bush with that first cuppa. While management is getting brekky ready.

Try again (joking)

As you say its up to the user to do as he/she pleases.

Phil

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Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:23

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:23
Phil

Having worked in the transport industry for over the last 20 years i have seen some changes in the way they monitor the big engines in trucks these days.One of the most recent things truck engine manufacturers have introduced to their engines is what we have in our truck fleet is whats called( there are other brands i know) is the Road Relay.This computer run devise monitors water temperature,oil pressure as well as a host of other things that it monitors as well.
ON the odd occasion that something has gone wrong with our engines this system( with the coolant side of monitoring just like the engine saver) has been able to pick up well before the trucks temp gauge has even moved!
These Road Relay systems actually shut these big engines down before they get to critical engine damage stage theerfor saving huge repair bills.The way i see it Phil is if truck engine manufacturers dont just rely on standard temp gauges then i do see my engine saver as a good investment.

just my thoughts,cheers.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:36

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:36
Hi Mark

I think a large prime mover type engine is a little different to my little family 4.2 lt one. For the truck, too right. Same for marine etc etc. But for the old 4wd. Only if you want to. I like to actually get down and look myself.

I have another issue with all this technology. Whilst I worked in the technology/computer industry for 40+ years I do not trust computers. They cannot reason if something is wrong. They just do what they are told. An incorrect sensor input stuffed Toyota's Prius. You and I would have realised something was amiss. Not the computer. So I will accept what is there and supplement it with my physical checks each stop.

A good excuse for a cuppa and a breather.

Answer me this and its not a trick or smart question. I am just curious. Do prime movers monitor their own tyre pressures? A bit hard I know on exchangeable trailers.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:50

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:50
Phil

why is your 4wd engine any different to a truck engine (other than the obvious size difference)??? Both are diesels and use the same principals.And the problems we had with our truck engines with engine coolant wasn't when we were parked up and had the convenience of looking underneath the bonnet.It was when we were travelling along that the Road Relay picked it up( which i might add the original temp gauge was saying everything was ok).
I understand what your saying with computer accuracy but it is the way of the world no days and we haven't much choice but to trust the damn things :-(
To your question about truck tyre pressure monitors....yes they most certainly do have this technology to monitor tyres( as you would appreciate with most trucks no a days have up to 32 tyres on the road and to have a gauge to keep an eye on all these tyres is a help.From what i have seen of them they are a wireless system that reports back to the prime mover thus not having wiring to hook/unhook up all the time.

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Follow Up By: Member - Geoff H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:51

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:51
I've always been of the opinion that I could always look at the guages when driving, however on a recent trip to the Cape I found I was regularly distracted with rough roads, dust, and race drivers coming the other so I didn't keep an eye on things like I normally do. Maybe it's age but I will have a look at one of these.
Regards
Geoff
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Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:14

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:14
Phil

enough you say on the engine saver????

i though we were having a discussion on water temperature monitors?

if you arnt interested in the discussion then dont respond ........simple?
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:19

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:19
Too true I am going to ask the moderator to remove my post as it is off topic.

Catchya I am off to my damned chemo anyway and no doubt straight to bed when I get home.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Geoff H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:25

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:25
I agree with you on that one Phil,

We were driving at 80 to 90 k which was comfortable and safe in our vehicle, however the drivers I referred to were oncoming and drifted across onto the wrong side of the road causing them to over correct with one of them ending up in the scrub.

Thankfully my wife is a nurse and everything turned out ok.

I certainly never abused anyone for overtaking us, and I certainly did not accuse you of racing, the overtaking was generally safe, but vehicles approaching on the wrong side of the road is another matter. Especially when they are close together and shrouded in dust



Geoff
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Follow Up By: ModSquad - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 14:30

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 14:30
Your post has been removed as requested Phil, now please keep this one in hand and keep this one on topic - peace guys!

Regards the Modsquad
Moderation is just rules

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Reply By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:54

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:54
One perfectly good reason to have one on a Toyota anyway is that the temperature gauge only works when immersed in liquid.

So its all very well to say you check every morning. I do to but you cant see a lot without taking the under tray off a Cruiser anyway.

Wont do you much good at 10 am or whenever when you flick a stick up and it goes through the radiator.

You wont find out by looking at the standard temp gauge cos it wont move at all.

Computers are dumb animals anyway They only do what they are told hence GIGO.

I also have worked with them for years and the most common problem with a home computer is the connection between the mouse and the chair LOL

I would rather be a geek with gauges than have empty pockets because I didnt.

AnswerID: 422671

Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:58

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 10:58
Forgot I believe that some do and some heavy trucks they can not only monitor the tyre pressures but pump them up on the move as well.
Hummers have a similar system on the original and military versions.


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Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:02

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 11:02
Graham

it is still earl days in regards to transport companies in using these tyre pressure monitors. some do some don't ( i guess that as technology progresses that more and more will start to use them)
the biggest advantage with the tyre monitors is not only tyre wear and the cost of repairs when you have a blow out, is the fuel saving that a truck can get when all tyres are at the correct pressure.
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 13:14

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 13:14
I understand all of that and thats why I have them as well. Have watched mine faithfully and after 55,000k the tyres are wearing well and lasting better than any other set of tyres I have ever owned.

I dont believe in the head in the sand attitude of denying progress and have gauges for what is important.

Far better to spend $500 on warning devices than $15,000 on an engine because you cant see the worth in them.

Just my honest opinion and every one else is entitled to whatever theirs is as well.


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Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 13:37

Thursday, Jul 01, 2010 at 13:37
Hi Graham,
"Far better to spend $500 on warning devices than $15,000 on an engine"
Dead right mate.
A small price to pay against the cost of a rebuild or replacement.
In a thread last year I mentioned how I warped a head on my old 1HDT from loss of coolant and a Low Coolant Alarm would of alerted me to the LACK of coolant in the system and not a temp gauge. That cost $2600 that I really could of spent else where.
Yes some gadgets are just for show, but that is what they all are if you don't understand them or know how they work.
Anyway, I'll fit mine next week sometime.

Cheers,


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Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 15:13

Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 15:13
She's in,
1 1/2 hours later and $275.00 of peace of mind.

Sensitive little bugger, which is good. Just went for a spin, amazed at how the temp rises but the factory gauge doesn't move at all, especially when backing off for an intersection or slowing down as we come back into a 50Kph zone from 100K's.
Anyway, I'm glad I've installed one.

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FollowupID: 693499

Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 15:51

Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 15:51
Yes the very reason for having one is the factory temp gauge which has a deadspot built in so as not to worry the sensitive people.

However as I said it still doesnt move if all the water drops out.

Not much good checking water at 8am and putting a hole in cooling system at 1115am

You will find out much sooner than your next morning check, like when the donk goes BANG

LOL

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Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 19:33

Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 19:33
Hi Graham,
Do the markings on the temperature dial, for the temp buzzer, do they represent a set Degree? It has Min & Max.
ATM the dial is dead smack in the center, is this the normal operating position for the buzzer?
Cheers.

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FollowupID: 693536

Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 19:48

Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 19:48
I bought my gear before he brought these out I and another member have a prototype which is a digital readout and can be set for low and high temps with a selectable degree. The sensor is bolted to the head behind where the top hose goes in. Usually sits around 76-82 deg . Highest has been 95 on the Willunga Hill

The low water temp is a seperate unit and is not adjustable as I would think it just alarms if the water level drops below the sensor in the top radiator hose.

Have never had a problem and the two spare radiator hoses I took with me are still in the drawers as is the spare tubes and puncture outfit


.


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FollowupID: 693542

Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 20:27

Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 20:27
Cheers Graham,
Yeah, your right the Low Coolant sensor isn't adjustable.
I bolted the temp senor to a spare bolt just under inlet piping that comes from the turbo to the inlet manifold, just above the block.It use to hold a braket that held the piping from the rocker cover to the inlet tubing to the turbo, to suck oily fumes out of the crankcase system, I've installed an Oil Catch Can.

I contacted David about the the markings and this was his reply.

"The markings on the dial should be close to min 60 max 120 with 100 at one O'clock"
Gives me an idea now.

So I guess it will be a bit of adjusting to find out where it sits comfortably, taking into account driving conditions and what time of year it is too I guess.

Thanks for your reply.






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FollowupID: 693553

Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 20:36

Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 20:36
I would attach it to either the block or as mine is on the head to get a true reading.
The manifold would read hotter I would think.

Assorted brackets not right on the head would vary greatly.

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FollowupID: 693558

Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 20:54

Monday, Jul 05, 2010 at 20:54
Oh Sorry Graham I didn't explain it properly. It is bolted to the head, about an inch above the head gasket. under the inlet tubing.
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I'll take a photo tomorrow of it in the light.

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FollowupID: 693561

Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Tuesday, Jul 06, 2010 at 18:41

Tuesday, Jul 06, 2010 at 18:41
Hi Graham,
Here is the picture of the fitment of the sensor wire.
Temp Sensor

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FollowupID: 693691

Follow Up By: Member - Mark G Gulmarrad - Thursday, Jul 08, 2010 at 10:13

Thursday, Jul 08, 2010 at 10:13
Graham

i got my true reading by attaching the sensor wire from my low water alarm to the original temp sender.
was the spot where i thought that i could get a more accurate reading,cheers.

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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 08, 2010 at 10:40

Thursday, Jul 08, 2010 at 10:40
My understanding is that it measures the heat of the metal rather than water temp.

My low water hose is higher than yours as below in the 1 HD FTE

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