Rock deflectors

Submitted: Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 17:15
ThreadID: 80094 Views:5948 Replies:5 FollowUps:9
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I read an old thread on this topic but was wondering if there is any new advice out there on how best to prevent stone damage to the front of your caravan or smashing the back windscreen of your vehicle when towing your van on gravel roads
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 18:08

Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 18:08
After experiencing a broken rear window, even through the trailer had an angled stoneguard on the draw bar, I now have three forms of protection.

A full width mud flap. (actually it is divided into two pieces, but only has a four inch gap in the centre) This hopefully stops most stones, etc. from being expelled out the back of the vehicle.

A trailer stoneguard. This is mainly to protect the front of the camper from any rocks that get past the.

A rear window protector as the last line of defence. Rear windows are expensive to replace and bloody inconvenient if one breaks while out in the never never.
I had an Obie's Rear Window Protector on the Jackaroo, (after the accident) but now make do with an opened out bear carton taped to the rear window of the Colorado.

The "stone" that broke the Jackaroo's window was still embedded in the glass. It was the size of two grains of rice and probably ricochetted off the stoneguard frame.


Bill.
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 18:23

Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 18:23
Beware of overheating diffs and rear tyres with a full width stoneguard

I had one on the cruiser when I started our trip.

One day I noticed the rear tyres were up to over 65deg.

Took the stoneguard off and they went straight back to 45.

Never used it again and gave it away in the finish.

Didnt take van on dirt roads much and never got any marks or broken windows in the next 45,000k I would suggest the rear window cover is the way to go.

Saw a Coromal with a full padded cover on the front of it in one van park.

Looked like the goods.

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Follow Up By: Member - Boo Boo (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 20:51

Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 20:51
Terrific Graham,

I have a camper trailer that is geting severely chipped and the back window of the troopy is getting a few chips but no cracks.

So ,,,,I thought about a stone guard on the trailer, but probably not feasible as the toolbox and boat motor bracket leaves no room.

I have just put new mudflaps on the troopy and have ordered a frame to be fit on on Monday so I can put a full length flap on the troopy,,,,I think you have just stuffed upthat idea.

Thanks very much LOL.
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Follow Up By: Member - Graham H (QLD) - Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 22:01

Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 22:01
Try it and see may work for you but didnt for me

However if you dont have tyre monitors you wont know I guess

Mine was hung in front of the towbar so one further back like Rocktamers may let more air flow through.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 22:15

Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 22:15
Hi Willharry

Like Sand Man we have all three (or did have rear window protectors when towing with the Patrol; not longer an issue with the F250 ute).

Yes, it is wise to have a gap between the over sized rear mud flaps to allow air flow and cooling. Check they are not dragging when you are loaded, hitched up and you all get into the vehicle.

Our rear window protectors were made of thick clear plastic stuck on with Velcro tabs. These did slip on the glass in very hot weather so needed a bit of watching.

Our caravan stone guard is made of shade cloth which is glued to a frame with contact cement, so it can be changed when excessive stones degrade it.

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Reply By: dnh2 - Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 23:29

Thursday, Jul 15, 2010 at 23:29
Try Goggle Towtector, We used one from Karratha to Weipa and return through the bush,on plenty of gravel roads and it works well. It fits neatly on the box tubing on the tongue of the tow hitch.Looks like and over sized brush as used on semi trailers to clean there wheels. It works great. They were/are available in Brisbane.(we've had ours for 3 years now and wouldn't travel without it)

Dave
AnswerID: 424171

Follow Up By: Willharry7 - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 07:24

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 07:24
Thanks for all the advice. The towtector looks pretty good Dave but just wondering whether small rocks would still get through the brush.

I will probably go with a combination of towtector, rear window saver and or rock deflector on the draw bar of the van .

If there is any more advice out there please post
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Follow Up By: dnh2 - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 09:37

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 09:37
G'day Willharry7,

In relation to small rocks getting through, we had no problems with the smaller sized rocks as the brush is several layers thick and they get caught up in the brushwork,this is also the same for sticks as well.

To clean its just a simple run along the bottom with a large screwdriver or something similar to open the brushes and the debris falls out.

Dave.
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Follow Up By: Member Boroma 604 - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 09:41

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 09:41
Gooday,
Have tried the full width rubber flap off the tow bar and it works with limited success, also will be a problem as far as overheating, something I had not thought about.
Have since made up a Rock Stopper that clamps onto the A frame of the Caravan, also has removable ends to access generator box etc. Decided to use indoor outdoor carpet instead of shade cloth which I feel acts a bit like a trampoline mat. Will be trying it out properly next month with a trip across the centre which I did previously in 2005 with the rubber flap. Found that as soon as you get up to 30-40 Kph the wind lifts it up and the stones still fly.
Have had the new version on for a year and with limited use and so far extremely happy with it. The Carpet is easily replaced, light, and acts as a cushion when a rock hits it.
Haven't posted image here before so hope it turns out OK. If not you will have to send me a private message.
Cheers,
Boroma 604
it.Image Could Not Be Found
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FollowupID: 694596

Follow Up By: Member Boroma 604 - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 09:49

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 09:49
Gooday,
Well, almost got it right, here it is in place.
Cheers,
Boroma 604.Image Could Not Be Found
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Reply By: Member - Niss42 - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 10:06

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 10:06
G'day Willharry7

I fitted a full width stone protector to the Patrol For the Darling River Run in April this year It worked a treat.
I used Truck Spray Brush, small stones can pass through but are slowed greatly,
and air can get through also.

Niss42




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Follow Up By: Member - Niss42 - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 10:26

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 10:26
Willharry7
Forgot to mention there is a photo in my Profile

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Reply By: Willharry7 - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 16:11

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 16:11
G'day Niss42

Thanks for your reply. Where did you get the brush from and how did you install it?
AnswerID: 424216

Reply By: Member - Mark E (VIC) - Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 23:08

Friday, Jul 16, 2010 at 23:08
One thing that is often overlooked on touring vehicles that tow is the length of the original mud flaps.

A friend of mine took some photos and did some measurements and given that he (and most others on here) have raised suspension, this raises the level of the mudflaps somewhat and allows more stones to be deflected up at a higher angle than would be with normal height suspension.

A simple fix is to 'lengthen' your original mud flaps with a bit of rubber (say, from Clark Rubber or the like). Also cheap and effective.

I also have a set of perspex rear window savers and have never had any problems.

Cheers,

Mark
AnswerID: 424276

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