HAND THROTTLES

Submitted: Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 21:34
ThreadID: 80158 Views:3517 Replies:12 FollowUps:14
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Hi all,

A question for anybody that knows the answer, when were hand throttles banned and why. I have an 80series with one and find it so handy, but was talking to some one the other day and he said they were now illegal which came as a surprise to me. have been googlimg with no luck so thought I may get a result from the forum.

Thanks in advance for any information.

Warren.
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Reply By: Joe n Mel - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 21:43

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 21:43
what do you use it for, if you dont mind me asking ??
AnswerID: 424441

Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 21:56

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 21:56
When you need to maintain constant speed and torque across rough terrain such as black soil plains or waterlogged tracks usually at low speeds.

Mine has it...2006 cruiser ute.

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.

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Follow Up By: Member - warren h (SA) - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:02

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:02
I use it wnen I want to charge the batteries after doing short early morning trips in the dark and there is a lot of drain without a lot of juice going back in, so get to work and up the revs for half an hour. I have a 60 litre engel which is running all day so need to keep things topped up. It is also handy off road when you want to keep the revs constant at a low speed.
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Follow Up By: Allan B, Sunshine Coast, - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:08

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:08
Banned? Didn't know they were.

I find mine in the 2002 Troopy really useful when traversing rocky creeks to avoid the foot bouncing up-and-down on the throttle.

But I am not so stupid as to use it as a "cruise control" on the highway!

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - Royce- Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 23:50

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 23:50
In some river crossings it's very handy to keep a constant throttle as you bounce over loose rocks.
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Reply By: BuggerBoggedAgain - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:01

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:01
Had one in my International 6WD tractor towing 105mm Howitzer, used for travelling over rough terrain at a slow-steady speed,
AnswerID: 424444

Follow Up By: Allan B, Sunshine Coast, - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:11

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:11
A 105mm Howitzer?? Now that could REALLY put the Road Rage merchants in their place!! LOL

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:29

Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:29
Man after me own heart.. Although I preferred the ACV for off roading.
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Reply By: Tim HJ61 (WA) - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:12

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:12
I guess because they are a poor man's cruise control, but without the safety features of normal cruise control. Bods would have left it wound out and run off it at highway speed. Dangerous if things go wrong.

Like the others, I like using it off road working slowly over bumpy country, particularly with the 12H-t with it's very twitchy throttle.

Tim
AnswerID: 424445

Reply By: get outmore - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:15

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:15
never heard of them being banned even the nerw utes have idle up

they do ahve a couple of 4wd applications but there main purpose for existing is for PTO output
AnswerID: 424446

Follow Up By: get outmore - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:16

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 22:16
with PTO outut capability a rareaty in most 4bys these days thats what would have happened to them
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Reply By: Voxson - Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 23:07

Sunday, Jul 18, 2010 at 23:07
My 105 doesnt have one
AnswerID: 424449

Follow Up By: Member - Shane D (QLD) - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 17:28

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 17:28
Neither does mine, wish it did, upgraded '05 model, ex Gov, thought they may have taken it off.

Shane
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Reply By: Ozhumvee - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 07:34

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 07:34
Saves the manufacturers a few dollars per vehicle and 90% of owners will never use their 4wd for what it was actually built for so won't miss it.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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AnswerID: 424457

Reply By: Fab72 - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 13:00

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 13:00
Just checked with a mate who works for Transport SA vehicle inspection station.
Not banned, just phased out by manufacturers. No ADR to say you can't have one fitted.

Fab.
AnswerID: 424482

Reply By: MEMBER - Darian, SA - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 18:10

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 18:10
Had one in my 90 Mazda Bravo - useful on rough ground in low range - rarely used but - definitely not a cheap cruise control !
AnswerID: 424507

Reply By: Member - Damien L (Cairns) - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 20:13

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 20:13
Our bus at work (Toyota Commuter) has one. I wanted to fit one to my Hi Lux, same moter as the bus and they said it can't be fitted to it.
Damien
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AnswerID: 424533

Follow Up By: Tim HJ61 (WA) - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 22:07

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 22:07
Buy an aftermarket choke cable and connect it to top of the accelerator pedal where the current throttle cable is connected. Doesn't need to go onto the motor.

Tim
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Reply By: Fatso - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 21:39

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 21:39
I heard they have been made obsolete by the fly-by-wire throttle controls. Their intended use was to stop throttle bounce on rough terrain at low speeds.
The fly-by-wire computer thingos do this now.
They were mainly vehicles intended for off road use. Meaning most earlier four wheel drives & later commercial four wheel drives.
I have had them & they were worth their weight in gold in low range for crawling over rough terrain or charging their batteries.
AnswerID: 424546

Follow Up By: Member - Rob Mac (QLD) - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 22:37

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 22:37
I don't think they are obsolete. My December 2003 HDJ79 has a potentiometer (TPS) and still has a wind up throttle control, never used it for cruise control but use it to step up idle for charging batteries or last weekend to run my newly installed 3.5CFM compressor (60 Amp start-up under load, 20 Amp run) to do my tyres coming of Tewwah beach. Never thought about using it for rough country.
Rob Mac
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Follow Up By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:32

Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:32
Fly By Wire definately doesn't solve the issue of throttle bounce. Just upgraded the Statesman (95 model) to an '06 SV6 manual that has FBW. Bloody thing can be a real pain as the throttle is far too light and sensitive.

It's red though, and goes like stink ;-)))
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Reply By: gottabjoaken - Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 22:27

Monday, Jul 19, 2010 at 22:27
Not a poor man's cruise control, that is true, but oh how I'd like to have a "cruise control" that set the throttle opening rather than the vehicle speed.

As mentioned, acceleration up hills is often not what you want, just to keep the throttle opening and let the vehicle slow up a small slope, then regain speed to the desired level on the other side would be great.

That would help improve the consumption aspect of cruise control too.

With fly by wire controls it ought to be even easier to achieve.

If the safety aspects in a normal cruise control could be adapted to set the throttle opening at a chosen cruise setting I would be happy.

Of course I'd probably want both types fitted, to use in different circumstances, as well.

Ken
AnswerID: 424556

Reply By: vk1dx - Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 09:19

Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 09:19
I have a safety question.

Does the hand throttle automatically turn off if you need to hit the brakes or whatever in an emergency?

Phil
AnswerID: 424586

Follow Up By: Allan B, Sunshine Coast, - Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:09

Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:09
NO. That is why I only use it when traversing rocky creeks in a low gear or to raise the idle a bit to maintain a battery charge rate whilst using the compressor.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:33

Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 11:33
Thats a bit dangerous then if you drop into a hole or get hung up on something. I remember getting caught when using the one on the old Army landrovers. Put me off them forever. I just rest the side of my foot on the body trim. It does the same thing and is quicker and safer in releasing or adjusting the setting.

I thought they would be safer these days. A bit archaic if you ask me.

But its your car.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Allan B, Sunshine Coast, - Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 13:39

Tuesday, Jul 20, 2010 at 13:39
Not at all dangerous Phil. I only set the throttle at about 1000 revs no-load which takes the Troopy through a creek nicely in 1st or 2nd. But if I did get hung-up or needed to pause, throwing the clutch out only raises the engine to 1000 revs which is no problem. I can then add a bit more throttle with the foot pedal to climb up the creek bank.

I am quite safety conscious and would not do it if there were any risk. In fact I perceive some risk in not using this technique. The trick is to not set the hand throttle at too many revs.

Cheers
Allan

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