Best tyre width for destert trip

Submitted: Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 20:26
ThreadID: 8245 Views:1831 Replies:11 FollowUps:7
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I am planning a Simpson Desert trip but am not sure which tyres are the best for the trip.

I currently have two sets of wheels for my 60 Series Landcruiser. A set of 7.5 inch Desert Duelers I use as road tyres and a set of 10 inch All Terrains for off road.

The question is which is the most suitable for the Simpson Desert. I hope someone can help me.
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Reply By: ptcrowe - Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 20:57

Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 20:57
There was an article in last months 4x4 monthly that covered this exact topic Wayne. They tested a variety of tyre widths at various pressures and found that The footprint of the tyre when deflated grew in length more so than width. So in short to answer your question either tyre would do the job in the sand without any great probs. I would say that you would not notice the difference between the two when deflated.
Have fun.
AnswerID: 35918

Follow Up By: Wayne - Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 21:19

Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 21:19
Thanks
I saw that article in 4X4 Monthly a couple of years ago. I have used the 10 inch tyres in the Little Desert, Victoria and another 60 Series on the trip had some 7.5's on. He was using high range when I had to use low range (both cruisers were 4.2 diesels), so there is an advantage with the 7.5's but I am not sure which would be better for the Simpson, with finer sand and bigger dunes.
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Reply By: Phil G - Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 21:38

Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 21:38
Wayne,

It doesn't matter. Most important thing is to run your pressures at about 20 psi the whole way across; use tyres that still have good tread and don't overload too much, and don't be in a hurry. We've run club trips the last two years and had no punctures between 18 vehicles in two trips. My preference is for the skinnier tyres, and the 750R16 Desert Duellers 8-ply are a good tyre.
AnswerID: 35921

Follow Up By: Wayne - Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 21:49

Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 21:49
Thanks
I think I will try them for my trip.
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Follow Up By: Phil G - Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 12:41

Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 12:41
Wayne,

Perhaps the only other comment is that if you are running split rims, then the quality of imported tubes may let you down. Many of the Korean tubes don't seem to cut it and will split of their own accord.

My personal preference is for skinnier tyres (say 235/85R16) on tubeless wheels.

Phil
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Reply By: Martin - Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 22:08

Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 22:08
I had no problem with road tyres on a Prado. 265/60/16 (I think) - whatever the standard tyre is anyhow. Less aggressive tyres are better in sand as you need flotation and momentum rather than digging power. As an example of that there were four Ferguson tractors crossing at the time I went and none of them were able to get over "Big Red". They just ground to a halt and dug into the sand. I got over easily with a bit of momentum.
I'd be inclined to go for the Desert Duellers as they are less aggressive than All Terrains. Pressure down to about 20psi. Good luck!
AnswerID: 35926

Reply By: Eric Experience. - Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 22:27

Saturday, Nov 01, 2003 at 22:27
Wayne.
The narrow tyres will use less fuel as you can stay in high range for 90% of the trip. Enjoy the trip. Eric.
AnswerID: 35928

Reply By: Members - Greg & Gail - Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 00:08

Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 00:08
Leave the All Terrains at home. The problen is punctures on the approach roads to the Simpson Desert.
AnswerID: 35937

Reply By: Member- Rox - Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 11:22

Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 11:22
Wayne, I have found that skiny tyres seen to go further in hi range &2wd on beaches when I was using 4wd with 275/70/16 fats at 18psi so I am going to change back.Have 4WD will Explore
AnswerID: 35957

Reply By: Alex H - Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 14:14

Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 14:14
The previous replies say it all really - adhere to the KISS principle (keep it simple) and stick with the 750x16's. I've done the Canning Stock Route twice on 750x16's and never had any problems. The big advantage over wider tyres is they push less of a bow-wave of sand in front of them so you need less power and fuel to get over it.
Cheers, Alex
AnswerID: 35963

Follow Up By: Member- Rox - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 01:42

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 01:42
I couldn't agree more thats why I am looking for another set of skinnys for campertrailerHave 4WD will Explore
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Reply By: chopper - Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 16:28

Sunday, Nov 02, 2003 at 16:28
7.50x16 are also taller than 31x10.5, and when deflated that extra height quickly becomes extra footprint, I would go the 7.50x16.
AnswerID: 35971

Reply By: Drifter007 - Monday, Nov 03, 2003 at 12:21

Monday, Nov 03, 2003 at 12:21
Hi

I crossed the Simpson a few weeks ago (Nissan GU 4.5 TI) running 285x75 MTRs, with pressures down to 20 and following the French Line east west managed 95% of the trek in 2WD. Just a few peaks on western side required 4WD high. One thing to consider is the roads on the way over and back. I travelled up the Mt Hopeless rds, Bore Track and Walkers Crossing on the way up, all of these roads had a fair amount of mud and may well of stopped a lesser tyre (especially with 3 tonne tare).

Either way the sand was reasonably firm especially early mornings but later in the year I suspect that all this will change.

Have fun
Drifter...
AnswerID: 36041

Reply By: Wayne - Monday, Nov 03, 2003 at 15:58

Monday, Nov 03, 2003 at 15:58
Well, the concensis is the 7.5's are the way to go.

Thanks to everyone for their response.

Wayne
AnswerID: 36076

Reply By: Slammin - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 01:02

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 01:02
Geez Wayne it looks like I might be late for others to read as I've been out but something that should be mentioned is in regards to the comments about i did most in 2wd. The use of 2wd particularly in sand or v.gravelly conditions will wear the rear tyres out faster than the x with a mastercard.
Also I question whether the tread lightly concept was used when it seems to be consensus that 4wd does less track damage and a last point the engine while able in 2wd will definately be less stressed in 4wd.
Have a great trip wish my ankle biter was a bit bigger!
AnswerID: 36136

Follow Up By: Member- Rox - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 01:50

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 01:50
Yea i agree with you Slammin , what were saying is that it takes less effort to get the car going with skinnies
Same beach skinnies v fats
same track skinnies v fats
but I still use 4wd its just posible to use 2wd with skinnies, as fats need more effort/ mussel
Ive had trouble in 4wd at 18psi in fats on a beach & seen skinnies do the same in 2wd, pushing less sand bow waveHave 4WD will Explore
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Follow Up By: Wayne - Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 21:01

Tuesday, Nov 04, 2003 at 21:01
I have adopted the policy of going into high 4 when ever I am off road, even on dirt/gravel roads. All Wheel Drive vehicles have at least got that right.

Slammin, I hope your kids take to camping. Mine are old enough, grown up actually and are not interested. Neither is the wife, so I have to head off with some mates. There must be a silver lining in there somewhere.
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Follow Up By: Drifter007 - Wednesday, Nov 05, 2003 at 15:01

Wednesday, Nov 05, 2003 at 15:01
Slammin
In reply to your comments re tread lightly and 4WD v 2WD.

I must explain that at no time did I have any wheel spin during my dune crossing, I am merely pointing out that at the time I crossed the desert the sand was firm enough that with tyre pressures set right and a sensible amount of momentum it was easy to traverse the dunes.

When ever I approached a dune that I felt needed a little extra I grabbed 4WD high on the fly just to assist with the climb, this was usually when the approach speed had to be reduced due to rough track conditions.

Only two things really help when climbing sand dunes, "flotation" and "momentum" the extra traction gained when using 4WD is mainly required when there is a deficiency of the first two.

No Dunes were hurt during the making of this trip

Regards
Drifter...
In closing re the engine stress, i was conserving fuel and for the main part the engine was coasting at around 1,500 rpm and doing it easily.
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FollowupID: 26186

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