Keeping spinifex out of the radiator.

Submitted: Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 17:13
ThreadID: 91873 Views:5045 Replies:8 FollowUps:19
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Looking for ideas on what people are using to keep spinafex out of the radiator, I have a 100 series diesel. Pics would be great.

Cheers
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Reply By: Dust-Devil - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:16

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:16
Duuuuude! you need one of those ultra-new radiator 'spinafex keepa outa' thingies, that are the current rage for all Spinafex Country traveling 4WD'ers.

They are so new and go so fast that I haven't been able to get a pic yet, however when I do so I'll send you a pic ASAP.

Regards

DD

PS

Need your email addy, which I can't find for 'THE PICS'.
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:21

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:21
Thanks DD, krakkahorne@gmail.com

Peter
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Follow Up By: Geoff in SA - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:21

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:21
In the meantime I suggest you just stay outa Spinafex country untill they become available
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:55

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:55
Yeah, yeah yeah, thanks D @ D, hahahaha, I'll be waiting in anticipation thanks Geoff.

I'll get even one day.
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Follow Up By: Dust-Devil - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:56

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:56
Krakka

Just sent a pic of what you requested

DD
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Reply By: olcoolone - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:28

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:28
Shade cloth over the bull bar, sponges in the gaps and a spinafex hook for under the car.

For our radiator protector we got Halls to make it out of their youbute shade cloth/stoneguard stuff.... punched some holes it it for eyelets and some cable ties and ocy straps and your in business.

You have to watch the engine temp on the warmer days.... when we did the Madigan and Hay River the going was very tough in 35deg. temp with a tail wind.
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:59

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:59
Thanks olcoolone.
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Reply By: Mick O - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:41

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 18:41
Peter,

I've always used a swathe of 75% shade cloth. Secure it well back underneath and then plug the side gaps or holes in the bull bar with the large carwash sponges you can get from Bunnings for a dollar each. These can be cut to the right shape and a bit of holds them in place. Make sure that the shade cloth is secured under the bonnet so no seeds can get in over the top of the bull bar.

I also use the sponges and gaffer tape to ensure that the gaps are blocked between any under body protection , the bull bar mounts and the engine bay protection inserts.

Image Could Not Be Found



Cheers,

Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:01

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:01
Cheers Mick, good to see a pic. Will look into those suggestions.
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Reply By: Member - bbuzz (NSW) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:39

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:39
Shadecloth?
I thought the thicker material stopped too much air from getting to the air con condenser and made it work harder.
The suggestion I heard was to use mosquito window material as it stopped everything, including insects but let enough air through to keep the coolers working.

Could be wrong....

Bill
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:41

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 19:41
Thanks Bill, will check it out.
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:48

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:48
G'day Bill. Yep I've used it and still got a roll. I use it as a secondary and on the quads as a screen just in front of the radiator. It tears and damages a lot more readily than the shade cloth and is a lot more expensive. You can only afford to cover a smaller area like the radiator itself and you then have an awful lot of gaps to plug. As you can probably see from the picture, the cloth is fairly see through and allows a lot of air through. On the highway, I simply open the cable ties and roll it down (rather than move it entirely).

Haven't had an issue yet mind you my max day time temp has only been about 32-35C.

Cheers Mick

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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 07:52

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 07:52
Hi Bill

The 50% shadecloth I use does reduce the airflow a bit but this is more than compensated for by the fact that the energy required to keep the car moving in those situations is less , usually because while the ground is rougher the speeds are much slower.

Driving the Madigan line mostly meant 8 - 12kmh for hours with the engine ticking over a bit above idle.
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 20:50

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 20:50
Hi Peter

It is a real problem and it is not just the radiator, the whole underneath of the vehicle. I used shade cloth and it worked great, yet the stuff still finds its way in. My biggest problem was under the vehicle and as a safety measure, I was stopping every half an hour and using a long wire hook that I made up to pull out lots of the spinifex from every where under the car. Before I started, the first thing that I got out was a fire extinguisher along side me and a 5 litre garden stray unit full of water in case there was any hot spinifex, and luckily I never had to use it.

Trust me it gets into very nook and cranny, fuel tank guards, chassis rails, you name it is a real pain.

Even with the cover up front, I used a long soft paint brush each night to clean the radiator, engine bay and then spend about half an hour under the car.

The picture below was on a rare section of good track heading out into the Great Victoria Desert in the Sydney Yeo Range, east of the Connie Sue Highway.

Image Could Not Be Found



Cheers


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 05:55

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 05:55
Thanks Steven, some great tips there.

Peter
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 20:56

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 20:56
The past 7 years I've run aluminium flyscreen over the outside of the grille - full width and full height to cover the radiator. I use it because the airflow is good, the mesh is fine enough and the aluminium mesh is tough. To clean it off, you just rub your hand over it. My 79 series is pretty open underneath, being a traytop, so doesn't have much in the way of pockets that collect spinifex. I've not found the Madigan Line to be a problem but haven't been out there since the recent good seasons. Had the radiator out last year to check the radiator and condensor and wasn't much there.
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 05:56

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 05:56
Thanks for that Phil, another alternative to look at.

Peter
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 10:09

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 10:09
Try this one. Dual purpose to protect lights etc from stones and rocks as well as keeping insects, seeds and grass out of radiator.

1/4 steel rod bent into shape by hand and feet with two vertical bits matching the risers on the bull bar and then welded together. Then painted with etch primer and then flat black spray cans from Bunnings. Wire and nylon fly screen also from Bunnings.

Phil





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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 14:01

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 14:01
Thanks for the idea Phil, will give it some thought.

Peter
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 14:16

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 14:16
Not ex RASIGS are you? Dundas? White house?

Glad to help. It also saved the headlights but unfortunately not the windscreen. Stupid fisherman with a boat on a trailer throwing stones up. Got a couple of us. These people seem to worry about their boats with all the protection between the car and boat but stuff those following or going the other way. Just legal mud flaps, if any, and useless in the dirt.

Every time I see anything being towed I give them a very wide berth.

Catchya

Phil
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Reply By: equinox - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:05

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:05
Hi Peter,

Good question, one I certainly have not found the perfect answer for. No matter what is done there is always some seeds that manage to get through.

As mentioned shade cloth and sponges work well, I used these items in both 2010 and 2011 though differently.

2010 I went for localised protection, with lower grade shade cloth on either side of the front grill. This would last for weeks if used on only rough tracks. I replaced the bottom section after a week or so of hard country with a pillow, and that seem to fill a lot of the gaps.

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In 2011 I wrapped the whole bullbar up, mostly because that is what everybody else was doing. This seemed to work OK. I also had lower grade shade cloth on either side of the front grill.

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Hope that helps.

Alan

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Follow Up By: equinox - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:10

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:10
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:58

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 21:58
Yep, that's the idea with the sponges although I shaped mine to fit in the bull bar gaps with a stanley knife. Al's illistrated just how many gaps you need to consider finding and filling if you are serious about spinifex and grass ingress. (Struth Al, the 'Fair Maid' looks like the lead vehicle in a Punjabi wedding procession with all the floral tributes lol. ;-)

Cheers Mick

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Follow Up By: equinox - Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:31

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 at 22:31
I now have one of these fitted. This is good protection for the lower radiator from stakes etc yet stills allows airflow..

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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 05:59

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 05:59
Excellent pics, thanks Alan. Didn't quite realise the extent that you need to go to to stop those damn seed heads.
Like the look of that lower protector against sticks etc.

Peter
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Reply By: Robin Miller - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 08:04

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 08:04
We use shadecloth however the biggest issue with it was it getting into and around suspension and exhaust.

Like many things what really works is often not obvious.

Our most important accessory was to have a good matt you could throw on the ground and some gloves.

This is because the ground gets covered in spikey burrs and seeds. Unless you can quickly and easily get down under the car and clear the stuff then it builds up and then becomes the real issue.

You might be surprized how bad the burrs and seeds can be in some places.

Making it easy to clear build up means its more likely to get done at every stop.

P.S. Our Shadecloth used Velcro , again to aid clearing






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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 16:27

Wednesday, Feb 15, 2012 at 16:27
Thanks Robin, some more good ideas and tips. Hadn't thought of a mat to get underneath on.

Peter
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