GME antenna

Hi
On a trip to the High Country at the weekend I had a use of 380mm GME AE4013 aerial with a 2.1dbi gain.
I was waiting for my new AW 4703 1100mm with a 6.6 dbi gain to arrive. My old one had broken.

The reception of the 380mm aerial was very good.

I am wondering whether to stick with the small one or go for the bigger one.
I rang GME and they said the smaller one is better in hilly areas but the bigger one is a better all-rounder.

The trouble with the bigger one ( other than the price ) is it hits entrance's into car parks and garages. You also seem to get more distance squelchy chit chat.

What do some of you have ?

Lachie
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Reply By: Member - Tony V (NSW) - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 14:08

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 14:08
Lachie,

I have a GME AE4705 mounted on the bumper part of my bull bar, not the top loop.
It is 1.2 mtrs high and the total height is 2.1 mtrs above the road. It is just taller than my Landcruiser 100 and is a great indicator if I will fit into a car park.


AnswerID: 480420

Reply By: Member - Tezza Qld - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 14:10

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 14:10
Hi Lachie

I use RFI antennas at 4.5 db gain All my antennas are roof mounted but one on the tour vehicle is changed to 6 db for desert work.

The 4.5 antennas are metal . ground independent and about 350 in height.

Whilst they are metal they are very flexible and I haven't had any issues to date.

Might not look as flash as those big bullbar mounted ones but I reckon they work just as good if not better.


Cheers Teza
AnswerID: 480421

Reply By: olcoolone - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 16:36

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 16:36
If you are going to only do hilly driving stick with the 2.1dB gain but for overall driving I would go a 6dB.

Between the two there will be very little difference ..... to many people make a big deal about this gain and that gain.
AnswerID: 480427

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 16:47

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 16:47
I had an AE4705 mounted on the bullbar, 6.6dBi, 1200mm, white 20mm tube type. Being struck by scrub destroyed the fragile internal choke components.

Changed to a MobileOne S474, 4.5dBi, 600mm, Stainless wire type coiled at centre for choke, and mounted on roof for ground plane. Works even better and very robust. 4.5dBi is good compromise for general terrain.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:17

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:17
We use Laser brand UHF antennas, one for UHF CB and the other for our NextG modem.... both mounter on the roof rack and both have springs.

The UHF one is 6.5dB and the NextG one is about 7.5dB.

Gain is a funny thing, we have never had problems with communication with others in our group.

4.5 - 6 seems to be a good all-rounder.
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Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 01:19

Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 01:19
"f you are going to only do hilly driving stick with the 2.1dB gain but for overall driving I would go a 6dB. "

I agree this combination works very well...
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Reply By: anglepole - Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 17:13

Thursday, Mar 15, 2012 at 17:13
Hello Lachie,

UHF communication is basically "line of site". Obviously if you are on the top of a high mountain your signal will travel a long way.

Range will be different depending on your surrounds. In my view, stick with the 2.1db aerial. This will also eliminate the mechanical issues with a large aerial mounted on a vehicle.

Cheers
AnswerID: 480432

Follow Up By: olcoolone - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:23

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:23
Line of site..... a couple of years ago we spoke to some friends who were just over 100 kilometres away with both parties using GME 5 watt handhelds..... even on 2 watts we could still speak to one and other clearly..... both were about 600 - 800m above sea level on two mountain peaks.

Get on the flat and we were lucky to do 5 kilometres on high power.
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Follow Up By: LeighW - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:41

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:41
The debate will no doubt start, generally UHF is line of sight which is why a lower gain antenna is recommended for hilly areas as it has a more ball shaped radiation pattern which is more likely to bounce of the top of mountains etc and increase coverage.

A higher gain antenna generally gives a flatter dougnut shaped radiation pattern is good for max distance over flat terrain.

Take aircraft for example, in flight they can get hundreds of k's range line of sight, on the ground death as a post.

Having said that you can always get certain terrain features and or atmospherics that will greatly enhance coverage but at UHF frequencies these usually only last for a very short time which is why outback travellers rely on HF.

Cheers
LeighW

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Follow Up By: LeighW - Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:47

Friday, Mar 16, 2012 at 09:47
By line of sight I refer to point to point with no obstruction between, and even with lower powered radios can be quite a distance as written above though the closer to sea level the less the distance will be.

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