Battery chargers

I have recently purchased projecta ic1500 charger.
I planed to charge a thumper 75 ah , a redback 120ah , and a 33ah.
I have been told by the manufacturers that this charger will not do the 75 ah and the 33ah batteries.
Does anyone have any experience with this issue.

The question is will this unit do the job , or will I have to upgrade to the ic 2500 unit.

Rob.


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Reply By: Battery Value Pty Ltd - Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 00:30

Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 00:30
Hi Rob,

AGM batteries like to see a bit more current than that.
They're most happy if the charging current ranges from 10% to 30% of their Ah capacity.
Some AGMs like the latest stop/start designs can absorb current @ 50% of rated Ah, and higher.

Because your batteries vary quite a bit in capacity, I recommend a charger with adjustable max charging current.
The same charger also offers two independent outputs which allows you to charge two batteries with unequal SOC without affecting each other (no cross currents from one battery through the other).

There's more about them in our profile.

cheers, Peter
AnswerID: 480593

Reply By: Ross M - Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 13:51

Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 13:51
G'day Rob48
Peter from Better Value know these systems better than me but I think the Projects 1500, while it sounds a BIG number in milliamps is likely to be 1.5 amps of charge. This how most chargers are presented to purchasers.

Talking in milliamps as a selling point is idiotic in my opinion, it makes a decent charger as Peter said about 10% of a battery ah size to be a 10,000 model.

The 1.5 ah charger, using some maths will take a long time to charge a half discharged 120 ah battery. Possibly around 40 hours or more, and that is just one of your batteries. If you are thinking of overnight recharging at a caravan park then it isn't going to work.

You have 228 ah of storage and the mighty 1500 charger will take around 152 hours or more, over 6 days to recharge from 50 discharge point.
Yes you need a bigger charger suited to your recharge requirements.

Peter can probably suggest a suitable unit if you let the forum know what the/your expected situation is likely to be.

I notice you mentioned thumper 75 ah. I know it is a brand name but it sort of implies something to buyers. Expect it to act as just another battery because that is what it is, just a battery in a box with no more THUMPING ability than any other system or battery.

I use a 12amp, thats the 12,000 model by comparison and on my 220 ah system, I use it only in emergencies and it takes a long time to bring up the charge level.
AnswerID: 480635

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 14:42

Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 14:42
Ross,

The Thumper does a little more THUMPING than what you have indicated.
The 75Ah thumper although rated as a AGM deep cycle battery pack also provides a high amount of cranking amps, enough in fact to start my diesel.

The case contains multiple arrays of cell packs, so in effect it has several small batteries inside the case.
A very versatile portable battery system in fact.
I am in no way associated with Blue Apple (the manufacturer), just a satisfied customer.

I have a 100Ah auxiliary battery system in the back of the vehicle and run my fridge off this while travelling.
I use the Thumper when I take the Tent, instead of the camper, but usually carry it anyway for a portable supply for "emergencies".



Bill


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Follow Up By: Battery Value Pty Ltd - Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 15:20

Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 15:20
Hello Bill,

...The 75Ah thumper although rated as a AGM deep cycle battery pack also provides a high amount of cranking amps, enough in fact to start my diesel.

The case contains multiple arrays of cell packs, so in effect it has several small batteries inside the case. ....

Eh, what's so special about a 75Ah AGM being able to crank a diesel?
Any half decent AGM of similar capacity achieves the same thing.
In fact, we have a 70Ah rated AGM which is specced 750CCA with good cyclic properties.

Splitting the total capacity over a bunch of smaller batteries in the same box has only one advantage namely better flexibility in the layout (fill factor).
But there's also a major downside: cost of labour and materials wiring up all the batteries in the array - the buyer pays.
Needless to say that the $/Ah figure rises with smaller batteries because the manufacturing cost per battery (labour, plastic container manufacture, sealing, plate formation, testing etc) hardly decreases when you go down in size.

cheers, Peter
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Follow Up By: Ross M - Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 17:04

Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 17:04
G'day Sandman
If the diesel you are referring to is a 3litre Colorado then a normal car battery will crank it very easily. It has a geared starter and uses mechanical advantage of the electric starter to crank the engine. This is very common nowdays and big starter amp currents aren't involved.
I have a Dmax and it takes very litle current to start it, the diesel 4lt 12ht LC I had also had a geared starter and it too didn't require any thing more than a car battery. It just had a big battery for back up by design.
I agree with Peter, the Thumper while it is a good bit of kit costs more than an equivalent battery size, it is just convenient and is used for that reason.

I prefer to buy a bigger but cheaper battery and just run a small wire size 12 v extension lead to tents and outdoor areas for lighting etc.
All the heavy use stays in the vehicle.
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 13:09

Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 13:09
Peter & Ross,

I hear what you guys are saying and would agree that the equivalent size Ah battery may be obtained cheaper.

But, I am still an advocate of both the Thumper and the Sidewinder Flyer battery packs for several reasons.

When I purchased the Colorado, there was just no room in the engine bay to consider mounting an auxiliary battery, even if I wanted to.
I already had the 75Ah Thumper but considered it a little low for a "full time" auxiliary to run the fridge in the back of my vehicle.
I would consider the 75Ah Thumper to be at the top end range of a truly portable battery system as far as weight is concerned.
Not only does it come with a set of jumper leads that plug into a 150Ah Anderson connector, but also has multiple plugs for accessories and it incorporates a digital volt meter to see at a push of a button, how much voltage remains in the battery.

Like the Flyer, both battery systems come with an in-car charging kit incorporating an isolator to protect the starting battery.
My Flyer contains a 100Ah Remco and is just too heavy to contemplate using as a portable system like the Thumper. The Flyer however is a great all encompassing solution for a dual battery system for dual cabs, or any other vehicle for that matter. Having the battery in the rear of any vehicle provides a much more non-alien environment that mounting one under the bonnet even if one has room and especially so for AGM batteries which are heavier and have a larger footprint than a standard wet cell battery.

As for the Thumper, it has proven useful to be able to jump start other vehicles and run things such as portable compressors, lighting, etc. whilst also being available as a backup to the Flyer, should I need it. It is a truly portable battery system that is not "tied" to any one vehicle.

Both systems can be recharged from the vehicle's alternator.

I like the flexibility and practicality of both the Thumper and the Flyer battery systems. Yes, their may be cheaper alternatives, but at the cost of much less functionality.



Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - Sn00py2 (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 13:59

Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 13:59
Hi All,

A google search shows the Projects ic1500 charger to be a seven stage 15 Amp charger suitable for batteries in the 85 ~ 300Ah range. Although its a bit dearer, the Ctek MXS15 by comparision (also 15 Amp) is an 8 stage charger suitable for batteries in the 30~400Ah range so it would have been a better choice for you.

I currently use a Ctek M300 (25 Amp) charger to charge 2 x 100Amp batteries and it does a great job. It will handle batteries in the 40 ~ 500 Ah range which well and truely suites my needs (fast charging).

Your Projects ic1500 would probably be ok with a 75 Ah battery provided you don't leave it connected for too long however I think it would probably cook/boil your smaller battery.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Sn00py2
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Follow Up By: Member - Sn00py2 (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 14:05

Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 14:05
Forgot to add....

According to the specs, the Projects ic2500 is a 7 stage 25 Amp charger suitable for batteries in the 14~500 Ah range. I don't know if that is a miss pint but if correct it is a better charger than the ic1500 for your needs.

All the best,

Sn00py2
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Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 17:30

Saturday, Mar 17, 2012 at 17:30
Hi Bob,
The answer is yes. You should probably upgrade if you can afford.

Projector also make a 35 amp unit I believe but of course you pay for the extra size and anything more than the 25 amp may not be justified for your requirements.

Go the 25 amp and you can't go wrong.

Cheers, Bruce
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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AnswerID: 480651

Reply By: Bob48 - Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 20:57

Sunday, Mar 18, 2012 at 20:57
Thanks
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