Fuel Tank and Radiator Goo

Submitted: Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 16:22
ThreadID: 92663 Views:1916 Replies:7 FollowUps:11
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I'm looking for some type of adhesive/sealant I can throw in the toolbox to block up any holes or cracks I may get in my fuel tank and radiator (both being made out of some type of plastic stuff these days).

Does anyone know of a 'magic' goo that can be used for this? I'm sure there must be something available.

Thanks in advance.
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Reply By: MrBitchi (QLD) - Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 16:29

Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 16:29
Selleys Kneadit will fix just about anything.

AnswerID: 480908

Follow Up By: Rockape - Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 17:14

Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 17:14
Agree with John.

I have a permanent repair to my rear fuel tank with Kneadit and it is very easy to use.

RA.
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FollowupID: 756309

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 21:46

Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 21:46
Another vote for Knead-it, and all its variants.

CRC also make a similar product called minute mend or something like that.

Gave some to local lads doing a bike ride from Winton down birdsville track, and back over the Plenty. They patched a motorbike casing with it, and it cpmpleted the journey, with no dramas.

Bob.

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 08:09

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 08:09
One for Bob and Rockape.

So often when you get a tube of glue you either don't use it for months or you use a smidgen and put it back in the toolbox.

My question is does this stuff go off after being opened and not fully used with the top put back on or does it go off in the tube?

I guess I am asking how good the packaging is. With my luck it would sit in the toolkit for ages and be useless when I need it. Just like all those old almost empty paint tins at the back of the shed. Kept because "I may need it one day".

Phil
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Follow Up By: Fred G NSW - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 10:28

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 10:28
Phil, from my experience Kneadit lasts for yonks as long as you seal the container after use. Some in the shed now that's been there (used periodically) for a couple of years now.

Fred.
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 10:51

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 10:51
Phil,
can't give you an exact shelf life but I just went out to my shed and the tube I have is about 8 months old and is good and that shed gets pretty hot. I just replace the aluminium disc over the end after use and store it back in it's container. If I wreck the disc I just use a bit of aluminium foil.

I think the price is around $12 but that could have changed.

Seeing I couldn't get to work due to flooding here is a picture of the repair. I did a spot repair first to stop the leak and then sanded the area with a disc. After that I used shellite to remove any grease and applied the final filler into a small piece of 90mm plastic downpipe to stop the filler spreading. Did a final sand and paint.

Image Could Not Be Found

RA.
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FollowupID: 756370

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 11:04

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 11:04
Excellent guys. I don't know RA if a patch in the bush would be as good as the tank job. More like "push it into the hole and wipe tha outside" would be the way. Well you gett he idea.

I put some in the car.

Cheers

Phil
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FollowupID: 756373

Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 13:22

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 13:22
Phil,

Don't know how long the stuff lasts either, but Fred's description is the best....it lasts for "yonks". I've got some I brought to town, when we shifted off the station, over 3 years ago, and it's still pliable. Think if you want it only as an emergency fix, it may pay to wrap it in Gladwrap, and reckon it'll last for "yonks", plus a bit.

Selleys and/or repco, used to make an Epoxy Ribbon, a two coloured strip of pliable putty, that you cut off a length, and mixed together til it was a uniform colour, and applied to whatever. Was good at the time, but did dry out much quicker than the above stuff. After a year or two, it was usually too hard to mix.

That's an impressive repair, RA, and with paint too. Never thought about sealing the leak first, then cleaning to make a better patch.....top job!!!

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 15:04

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 15:04
Phil,

I have had some of this knead it in my tool bag for at least 6 years, not sealed as the packaging doesnt last too long getting trashed in the tool bag. It did still have some loosley wrapped plastic around it and I tried it out a few weeks ago and still works great.
I spoilt it and vaccuum sealed it, back in my tool bag now for another 6 years.

Peter
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:40

Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:40
Thanks Peter and Bob.

Sorry for taking heaps to answer. Been in Sydney at the hospital

Phil
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FollowupID: 756639

Reply By: George_M - Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 18:09

Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 18:09
Siringo.

Last month I put a bolt through my radiator when I was touring around the High Country. I could see a jet of fluid escaping from the radiator, just under the lower fan blade.

Two hands full of Saxa pepper from Member: Murray R's tucker box, replace the cap and start the engine, and the radiator stopped leaking almost immediately. I didn't lose any more fluid during the 250klm trip back to Melbourne.

George_M
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AnswerID: 480919

Follow Up By: Fred G NSW - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 10:34

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 10:34
That's a good old bush remedy George. Another is to tip egg white into the hot radiator. Works well enough with small holes to get out of trouble. Just have to flush the system later on.

Fred.
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Reply By: Ross M - Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 21:00

Tuesday, Mar 20, 2012 at 21:00
Dyna Fuels PO Box 645 EndeavorHills Victoria 3802 Ph 0405749145 is an industrial chemist from the petroleum industry.
He selsl a radiator stop leak product and also fuel treatments for CRD engines and conventional diesels and petrol cars also.

The diesel additives also raise the cetane level of the diesel while cleaning and controlling algea.

Worth a call for a product you may need to use sometime in the future.
AnswerID: 480935

Reply By: Member - Bucky - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 04:37

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 04:37
Siringo

For Fuel leaks I recommend this stuff
Image Could Not Be Found


I have fixed/patched 2 tanks with this stuff. Latest being on the return trip from Cape York. Held from Bramwell Junction, to Wonthaggi, via a lot of rough roads, through central and outback Qld, and NSW
Remember, it's all in the preparation !
Needless to say that I used soap to initially seal the damaged tank.
A file to rough up the area, and get rid of paint.
And metho to make sure the surface was really clean.

Fully cures in 1 hr.

At Lockhard River Store, (2 or 3 days later), I then purchased some 5 minute Araldite, went over the patch again with a rough file, and covered the lot with the araldite mix.

After all I am Irish,
"to be sure, to be sure"

I have no doubts that it would work on radiators too.


AnswerID: 480961

Reply By: Siringo - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 09:02

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 09:02
Excellent, thanks to all who contributed, now to hit the shops!
AnswerID: 480966

Follow Up By: bruce b2 - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 17:12

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 17:12
agree with bucky - that stuff is magic, not sure of its shelf life but i'll check it and re-post on this thread.

bb1
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FollowupID: 756404

Reply By: Siringo - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 09:22

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 09:22
Can I ask a dumb question?
If you're zipping along and notice that coolant is squirting out of the radiator or a hose, do you try and block the hole immediately or drain the coolant first??

I guess it kind of depends on the damage I guess, but let's say it's a smallish puncture and the coolant is squirting out under pressure.

I fixed a punctured sump once with a screw and some mudflap. The oil only leaked out when the motor was stopped, so I kept the motor running while I fixed the problem, but radiators are different.
AnswerID: 481068

Reply By: blown4by - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 23:09

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 23:09
Q Bond
AnswerID: 481137

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