Isatphone satellite emergency number

I just got off the phone to our account holders (Addcom) for our Isatphone pro prepaid satellite phone.

They have an emergency number we can use in an emergency. When you call it you will be asked for your location and then transferred to the appropriate emergency contact for that area. They are considering sending out stickers for the phone and the car.

Still no "000" and, on commercial grounds, I would not hold my breath.

At least this is something.

The number is 0011290020900. In other words an 02 NSW number 90020900.

Phil
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Reply By: Member - Tezza Qld - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 15:54

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 15:54
Gee
My old eyes got blurry just looking at the number.

Would hate to have to dial it in a real emergency.

I'll stick with Telstra

Teza
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:18

Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:18
Put it in speed dial.

Phil
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Reply By: Member - Greg C (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 17:56

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 17:56
I may be wrong here, forgive me if I am, but something strikes me as a bit odd.

Isn't the code 0011 the number you preceed an international number with in order to dial out from Australia. Normally to call an Australian number from an international phone eg an Isatphone you would dial +619(2)XXXX XXXX. I'm interested to know as I also have an Isatphone, though I am pretty happy just having the appropriate RFDS & Police numbers programmed into it.

Cheers

Greg



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Follow Up By: Member - Greg C (NSW) - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 18:13

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 18:13
oops! phat phingers strike again, the number to dial int Aus (NSW) should read +612xxxx xxxx

Cheers

Greg
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:17

Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:17
You are correct Greg.

However I believe that I can also dial the 00112 prefix as well as the +612 prefix to get a Sydney number which this one is.

In the initial post I quoted it exactly as the bloke at our ISP told me.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Greg C (NSW) - Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 17:57

Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 17:57
Thanks Phil,

I don't know that it would work for me anyhow as I bought my phone from Allsatphones & the airtime provider is TCcommunications.

Cheers

Greg
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 18:39

Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 18:39
Well while no one is listening to us put it in there and if you try it and it works then so be it. !!!!!!! Okay??

But if your satellite phone service provider has a ground station in Australia then he (or she!!) has to provide 000 access. So you would dial 000.

Phil
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Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 22:25

Wednesday, Mar 21, 2012 at 22:25
Hi Phil - a bit of progress and good news for you. I suspect that is an internal number and service set up by your provider. Have you tried ringing it? It will not be like phoning 000.

ACMA Emergency Call Services will not open 000 to international numbers due to possible error calls from all over the world, but are working towards an awareness campaign to emergency services on this problem.

Does anyone here have a phone on Inmarsat through a different provider?

Motherhen
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Follow Up By: bob smith 1 - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 16:43

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 16:43
MH,
From memory you like me are with TRT on the suspension plan. I remember about 6 or 7 years ago TRT contacted everyone saying they could no longer provide access to 112. There was a huge carry on by them and customers as you can imagine the main reason for having a satphone is easy and free emergency access. Within a few weeks the issue was sorted and it was available again. Dont know what when on behind the scenes but it's got me buggered why this new player cannot have the same access as people on the Iridium network.
BS
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 17:30

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 17:30
Hi Bob

I haven't used TR Telecom as yet, because we haven't been travelling since i cancelled with Telstra after our 2009 big trip.

Mh
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Follow Up By: Member - Rod O (SA) - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 18:04

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 18:04
I am not sure why you would even try ringing 000 if you are using a SATphone... for remote use...

If you are not remote, I thought any mobile via Telstra would be cheaper/easier...
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 18:15

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 18:15
Hi Rod

Of course we would use a normal phone if in service area - but we are out of service area more often than not when doing a big trip. We have not travelled far since 2009, hence cancelled with Telstra, and will take up the four month minimum casual plan with TR Telecom when we go again. Both use the Iridium network, so 000 and other emergency service number do work. When there are possible health issues, knowing you can call out an any times makes travelling less stressful.

Mh
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 21:07

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 21:07
Hi Motherhen,

I took some advice from someone here recently, and instead of using TRT as I have done for many years, and had great service.
I simply signed up with Telstra on a $10 month Casual Plan, and enable international roaming. No minimum contract, no prefix numbers to dial in or out, just a standard mobile no. Of course calls are dearer than TRT but in emergency use who cares.

I could have simply used the sim out of my telstra mobile but I didn't want to muck around keep changing sims. This is in the Motorola 9500.

Regards
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Follow Up By: bob smith 1 - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 22:28

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 22:28
Yes Krakka you are spot on and am considering the same. I'm not prepared to use my everyday sim in the sat due to constant incoming calls but this sim has it's merits.

Now Rod what are you on about, if you need emergency assistance there are no better professionals than the the 000 call centre. They have all the resources at their fingertips.
BS
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 23:07

Thursday, Mar 22, 2012 at 23:07
Thanks for the advice Peter. Do you mean a non satellite phone plan? Not having mobiles on plans (ours are pre-paid), i couldn't do the SIM swap trick, but if i am understanding correctly, you have purchased another SIM just to use in the sat phone - is this what you mean?

Mh
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 06:04

Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 06:04
Motherhen that is correct. You can get a SIM with Telstra's $10 per month plan which is contract free, have it enabled for international and 1900 and it just works in the iridium phone. I went from TR Telecom to this a year or so back and haven't looked back. You can do it for as short a time as month if you like, and with a separate number you don't get pesky calls unless you want them.

Calls in and out are $.00 per min though.
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 06:05

Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 06:05
Make that $4.00 a min
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Follow Up By: Member - Krakka - Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 10:10

Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 10:10
Yep, as Boobook said, probably Boobook that mentioned it a month or so ago.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: bob smith 1 - Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 13:14

Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 13:14
Boobook,
Do you cancel your sim after each trip and get another one when you go away or just keep the same one.
Just curious, what would you be ringing that needs 1900 from a satphone ?
BS
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 15:23

Friday, Mar 23, 2012 at 15:23
Bob, I used to cancel after each trip and then sign up for a new service every time but I got a good number last time and have kept it going since then.

Re the 1900 access, I don't call any 1900 numbers but was originally told that you need overseas and 1900 enabled for it to work with the Sat phone. Maybe you don't need it but it doesn't cost anything so i just ask for it every time I get a new sim.
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:30

Saturday, Mar 24, 2012 at 16:30
MH

It is an ISP service that intercepts the call and switches it to the closest 000 number. They need to get an initial idea of where you are. That happens in the background when you call 000. As it does with 13, 1300 and 1800 numbers.

Rod

We don't want a telstra service because we want prepaid. Plus I am yet to see Telstra or any service provider give us access in the Simpson, Canning or the Vic High Country. 30Kms out of Canberra zip. nill and nunna access from any ISP. That's why a satphone. And at $500 its cheap as chips and get better coverage than HF.

Calls to and from our Isatphone are $1 plus a bit. He couldn't quote the figure exactly but its around $1.20 a minute. The caller pays.

000 is not obligatory from any satellite phone provider that does NOT have a ground station in Australia.

Sorry for delay to all. Hospital operation in Sydney. Again!!!!!

Phil

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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 06:47

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 06:47
Phil, I think you had better check the indial costs. Callers will pay between $14 and $24 per min. to call you, depending on which network they are on and if it is land line or mobile.

Call your isatphone pro for 50 seconds and try it, then make sure you are sitting down when you open your next phone bill.

This is the major downfall of the Isatphone pro and Iridium on a non telstra plan IMO. Callers won't, or even can't call an international number. Especially if a 15 min call is going to cost them anything up to $350.



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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 08:08

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 08:08
Hi BB. One day I will embarrass you and get your name mate.

This is from our point of view mate. I cannot speak for others so whatever the situation with Telstra is personally it does not affect us.

I am not bothered about the incall. That's their problem and the family, friends and the doctor are well aware of it.

We do not have the phone linked to any other service and it is totally isolated. No swapping of sims etc either.

We went with Vodafone because of free calls to the whole family. All our immediate family are with Vodafone. We haven't put money in the prepaid account for months and we speak on a regular basis. We have no reason to change as that is all we use it for. Other than that its the home land line at half the cost calls.

So we, the family, are streets ahead. It all works for us. If they put the fees for the satellite phone up we don't care. As I have always said it is for emergency and so what.

Mobile phone and all this communications technology including HF and ham radio is a personal choice and as you will no doubt agree, it has to be a value judgement according to each individuals needs and skills. It is quite a minefield for some.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 08:57

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 08:57
Geez, Sorry, not sure what I did wrong there!!!

I was just trying to highlight that the incoming call cost is not $1.20 as you had been told so you didn't get a big shock, and that I thought is was a major issue with Non Telstra Sim'd phones.


If you are happy and know the facts, then I am glad for you.

I'll go pull my head in now.

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 09:45

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 09:45
You didn't do anything wrong. I was just having a joke.

Alls fine mate.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Fiona & Paul - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 09:55

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 09:55
G'day all

For a change I hope not to screw up my information, (hopefully) I will have an answer to at least some of these issues next week when our Sat Phone (iSat or something like that) arrives and I think it's the one vk1dx was talking about. I told my supplier what I wanted the sat phone for - get me what would do the job of being there in an emergency, anywhere in OZ.

He agreed and the phone is in the post - I don't care about cost of calls because it is only used in emergencies, so hopefully will only be used for testing and I'll have some fun with that making sure it works from wherever.

My understanding is that out calls will be less than $1 a minute and I understood that incoming calls would be much dearer, so if anyone seriously wants to contact us they send a txt message and we call back. I will learn the truth of this next week.

Our kids only call when we are very remote and they can't often get to us now, then give us heaps when we get home. So with the sat phone in mind and the higher cost (???) of incoming calls, one or two $200+ phone calls will provide an instant cure........

Regards Paul H

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 10:07

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 10:07
Pretty much the same here Paul.

Our kids are now in their late 30's and early 40's so they can take care of things for us.

Get them to use emails it's free for them. Well apart from their internet account that is.

The phone has an inbuilt GPS email so you can send the grand kids your location very simply and they can follow you. I send it to all the grand kids in one email. Cheaper.

Well I am on a pension so monthly costs are important. That's why the prepaid. No monthly "plan" fees etc. But for an emergency I don't care a lot about the cost. Just do not want the phone to cut out if it is out of funds. I would give them the number and ask if I do cut out to call me.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Fiona & Paul - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 10:39

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 10:39
G'day Phil

I watch call costs also because that is VIP to us, I really meant that if we are in trouble and need help that's when the call cost dosen't matter to me.

My normal mobile is a $10 account and $1.20 every 25 secs, so it gets used three or four times a year, calls to Home are free. When SWMBO has been really crook the call costs went to $100's for a few days, she is still here and that's what matters to me.

We are off to far north Qld very soon and hoping to do the trip across to Noamanton, etc, depending on the weather of course, then back down through Boulia, Windorah and Thargominda.


Regards Paul H

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Reply By: Darren M5 - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 21:04

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 21:04
Hello everyone,

I will disclose from the outset that I am the manager for government, aerospace and defence at MGL Telecoms and would like to try and provide an unbiased response.

As a previous Victoria Police Officer and 000 operator I would like to comment on the Inmarsat Isatphone Pro situation once and for all. There have been many blogs making claims that because the phones can't call 000 that this is a real problem. Here are a few reasons why it's not an issue.

000 was designed for landline only and in fact as a service for phone boxes, so that should mr smith see a car accident on a street the system can recognise the exact phone booth and location for emergency services to attend. Later it was introduced to home phones, and unfortunately for all those would be movie police shows that show the operator saying, "keep him on the line for another 2 minutes so we can trace the call" it is in fact instantaneous.

1. Calling 000 doesn't guarantee that you will get an operator in the state you are calling from. In peak times you will be directed to an available operator which may in fact be in Brisbane, Adelaide, Melbourne or even as one person recently told me Hobart.

2. Secondly, the operator (once you have cleared the fire, police, ambulance clarification question) will direct you to the respective service for the long list of location questions. They will include "type of emergency situation, number of people involved, and the big one with sat phones what's your current location and nearest cross street" As one farmer recently told me, on his paddock there's not even a road, let alone a cross street!

3. Any calls made from an Inmarsat Isatphone Pro are treated as global, and as Inmarsat provides their own +870 776 global prefix, there is no requirement by ACMA (Australian Communications & Media Authority) for Inmarsat to provide what is actually a landline "000" service. Yes it would be a convenient feature, but its not a show stopper, and in fact as our staff have experienced, it can be more of a hindrance as you explain for the 4th time, you can't see a street sign and all you have is a mountain range as a reference.

In instances where satellite phones are used in remote parts of Australia I train people to call the RFDS (Royal Flying Doctors Service) as they are specially trained and equipped to deal with remote and rural emergencies. Every state in Australia has a landline number for the RFDS and by simply putting this in the sat phones address book you are assured a safe and faster emergency service in remote locations. In effect this will result in a faster response and they are also very capable staff at activating a more comprehensive emergency response through co-ordination of the other services if they feel it's a more advanced SAR (search and rescue) is required.

My advice is always the same, feeling ill, call the RFDS, feeling like your situation is far to serious or unmanageable, buy a PLB (personal locator beacon) as this will Certainly result in a SAR effort without the need to call 000 or speak to anyone.



Feel free to check
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 21:27

Sunday, Mar 25, 2012 at 21:27
Darren

Well put. This has all been said by many already but not in the one post.

Phil
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Follow Up By: Fiona & Paul - Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 12:53

Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 12:53
Darren

Thank you for the validation and although I have not yet got the sat phone in my hands, calling 000 was not on my list but the RFDS was on my list to visit on our way north.

Regards
Paul H

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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 13:38

Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 13:38
Paul

This may help: RFDS Emergency Contacts

Phil
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Follow Up By: Darren M5 - Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 13:41

Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 13:41
Hi everyone, you can also try our website that has them laid out a little easier to understand.

go to

http://www.mgltelecoms.com/mgltelecoms.com/emergency-numbers

Cheers

Darren Maggs
manager
Government | Aerospace | Defence
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 17:57

Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 17:57
Hi Darren, and thanks you for visiting EO and giving your viewpoint. The enquiry which directed you here was indirectly initiated by me; hence i am very pleased to see your direct response on this thread.

My concern is only to see that people are well prepared to make calls under the pressure of emergency on their particular phone and network, and that every member of the family knows how to do this. Even young children have been taught to use 000. I fully understand the reasons why 000 will not be available for international networks and am in communication with ACMA.

While i would, if able to at the time of an accident or medical incident, call RFDS (and i carry a card with the numbers), if needing fire or police i would call 000 or the nationwide (almost) 13- police number, as these are available on my network. So long as remote travellers are fully aware and prepared, may they never need to make one of these emergency calls.

Motherhen
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Reply By: wombat100 - Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 11:39

Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 11:39
Hi Phi,
Thanks for that info.
Do you know who the 'respondent' is for that number??
Cheers
J&D
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Follow Up By: vk1dx - Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 13:25

Monday, Mar 26, 2012 at 13:25
Sorry I do not know for sure. Myserice provider said it would be answered, you would be asked for your location and it would be switched on to the appropriate emergency contact.

I should have ased if it was 24/7 but did not think of it at the time.

You could ring yourself if you wish to 1300 789 600 and ask for Robert. He was the one I spoke to.

Phil

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