What pressure do you run in your tyres ?

Submitted: Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 17:40
ThreadID: 94724 Views:19099 Replies:8 FollowUps:22
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Hi All,

Looking for some answers, thoughts and opinions on the correct tyre pressure for 4x4 tyres.
I've been told by several tyre businesses to run 30 psi / 210 kpa in my 265/70 R16's Bridgestone A/T's on the Nissan Patrol Wagon, and the same pressure in the 265/70 R15's on the Mazda Bravo B2500 Traytop.

The neighbour has a Holden Frontier 4x4 wagon with Micky Thompson's (not sure of size) fitted and was told 36-38 psi / 250 - 265 kpa. Remembering that as tyres get hotter on the road he could well be up around 41 psi with the 10% increase due to the heat in the tyre.
Four tyre businesses in the city told him to run that pressure to prevent wearing the out side edge of the tyres.

To me If running 30 psi the tyre is flatter on the ground, therefore wearing the full tread width evenly. Running with the higher pressure wears the centre of the tread out first. We live in the country so 80-90% is highway driving.

I was once told that tyre companies will tell you to run higher pressure so they can sell you more tyres, this could be a true point. Any tyre experts out there to help please.

Cheers P&J
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Reply By: Kimba10 - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 18:04

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 18:04
I would have thought 30 way to low for a patrol on the back top. I have always ran 40 psi in my 3 prados and hilux and never had unusual tyre wear. I actually do this so to get a bit more life out of them as where I live is heaps of roundabouts so stops them dragging as much. Im suprised even inside your door or glove box the sticker from the factory is not telling you to run higher pressures ?? I run 34 in the wifes yaris which are 15 inch, my current prado is 265/65/17. Yes the ride may be a tad harsher ?? but certainly no excess wear in the middle of the tread. I still get a bit of feathering on the passengers front outside of the tyre but as I said this is from the bends and a common trait on the prado nothing to do with wheel alignment. My commodore I ran 38 all round they were 17 inch.. and personally by running a higher pressure I think you will also notice a fair improvement in fuel economy as well. I reckon looking at your tyres there would be a fair bulge at that pressure (30psi). Depending on conditions and surfaces I have been as low as 16 on the sand, 20/22 off road and 25 for rutted stuff but for black top wether loaded or unloaded its 40psi.....................
AnswerID: 482447

Follow Up By: Member - The old fellow - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 07:20

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 07:20
Are you setting these before you start? I find by using my TPMS that the pressure varies depending on the day temperature, if the sun is shining on one side or how long I have been driving for. I would like also to know how you can check the correct pressure on a gauge as I find many gauges vary, some up to four pounds psi.
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Follow Up By: Kimba10 - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 08:51

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 08:51
Hi there Old Fellow, I have a good quality guage and have compared it to a cheaper one I have had for years and both read the same. Suprising when I have used the air at the servos and things and I have double checked with my guage and both have been the same which I find amazing but I am talking about the newer systems where you punch in the pressure you want so the guage obviously like the older style isnt getting dropped and ran over on the ground. Im am checking at a cold temperature so obviously if a hot day and loaded it will climb to about 42/43 (when I have checked them) but to be honest while pressures are important were not driving F1 cars or Touring Cars so a psi here or there is not going to kill a LT tyre or even standard OE tyres. I have never ever had an issue with flats,blowouts, uneven wear, excessive wear, tyres running off the rim due to the pressures I run. As said where I live which is full of twists and bends and roundabouts (Glenmore Park Sydney) for those who know the area is the reason I run a higher pressure but if I lived some where that didnt have all this crap I would still be up around 36/38. Ive had the hilux, vitaras prior, and later had 2 x 90 series prados one petrol one diesel and now have 120 petrol prado. Two previous prados,hilux,vitara's I ran BFG A/T's on all of them, the 120 I have now I run two sets of wheels, the original grantrecks for around town and muddies for off roading and both are set at 40. If extremely loaded some times I might even run the rear at 42 (depends on weight). But drop these down depending on roads, sand, dirt etc....Cheers Steve
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Follow Up By: Member - The old fellow - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 10:18

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 10:18
Thanks Steve. I expect we are all, including me, getting a bit paranoid about tyre pressures. If you use the same tyre gauge and work on the four psi rule you can't go wrong. I run my Prado on the same basic pressures as you do and use BFG. ATs and have had no problems.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: miandering fiander - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 11:51

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 11:51
Currently have 119000 kms out of a set of BFG A/Ts on our 2004 120 series Prado T/D Yes the tread is getting low but still enough tread to safely pass a roadworthy. Run at 36psi cold on black top, 25 psi on the rougher gravel and 15 psi on sand.
Will be getting the same tyres again.
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Follow Up By: P and JM - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 16:50

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 16:50
Kimba 10,

Thanks, your driving conditions are certainly different to 80-90% country conditions.
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Reply By: mikehzz - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 18:46

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 18:46
Every tyre place seems to tell you to run the tyres a fair bit higher than the recommended on the tyre placard. I always stick with the recommended because you get a more comfortable ride and bits don't start rattling off the car. I prefer an engineer's advice to a tyre jockey...no disrespect intended. I rarely have tyre problems and do a lot of off roading. Everyone has their preference.
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Follow Up By: Madfisher - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 19:22

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 19:22
The engineers set that tyre pressure to give a good ride. Its common among people selling cars to they drop the pressure to give the imprssion of a better ride. AS Steve said 40psi gives better tyres wear and economy, BUT my back not the best anymore so I have backed of to around 35 on blacktop and high 20s on normal dirt roads.
Cheers Pete
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Follow Up By: mikehzz - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 19:40

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 19:40
Fair enough. I have never run 40psi and get good mileage out of my tyres. I have 75k on a set of Geolander A/T-S running at 32psi with quite a bit left on them. I run 24psi on gravel. I think the can of worms picture is applicable :-) It boils down to being comfortable with the car and your driving style I think.
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Follow Up By: Madfisher - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 20:01

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 20:01
Mike My mechanic sets my tyres to 40psi every service, but I find now its to hard and does bring out the rattles.
Cheers Pete
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Reply By: Member - Tony V (NSW) - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 18:56

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 18:56


P and JM

Stick to what the tyre placard states, some will say that car makers put the tyre pressures low so they can sell tyres, well car make cars and have no vested interest in selling tyres.

Over inflate and you do not have the road grip or braking footprint you need, under inflate and your car won't handle correctly.



There is a mass of information about the 4 psi rule and a mountain of information on tyre pressures if you do a forum search.

Me I run 210 kpa on my 100 series and drop pressures for beach and for dirt roads..

AnswerID: 482449

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 19:35

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 19:35
Another consideration is that the Tyre Placard rating is for OEM tyres and many upgrade to various forms of off road and LT construction tyres that would have different ideal pressure requirements
Also once you have driven with a TPMS system and see how your tyre pressures fluctuate during the day I think the 4PSI rule is a bit simplistic but a good guide just the same.

The answer to such a simple question is complicated by many factors including the driver

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Follow Up By: P and JM - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 16:54

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 16:54
Tony V,

Not hungry at moment tony, thanks for pics they say it all. Will show neighbour what the over inflated do. Cheers P&J
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Follow Up By: Patrol22 - Sunday, Apr 08, 2012 at 12:43

Sunday, Apr 08, 2012 at 12:43
AlbyNSW I believe has hit the nail on the head.....if you are running OEM tyres which are almost always HT pattern tyres then the placard settings are about right for wear and comfort. When you fit an AT or MT pattern tyre then things change somewhat. You will soon get an adverse wear indication if centre or edges as per the pics if running the wrong pressure for the vehicle/tyre combination for too long.
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Reply By: Sean C2 - Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 20:49

Friday, Apr 06, 2012 at 20:49
Yesterday I had a brand new set of geolanders put on my prado and they are set at 36psi ... Ride very comfy and I run mid to highs 20's on dirt depending on the type of ground I am driving on ... I think it comes down to personal preference and how hard you want your ride to be. I am very happy with 36psi on the black top.

Can of worms picture is spot on!!!
AnswerID: 482453

Follow Up By: P and JM - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:01

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:01
Sean C2,

What are these Geolanders ? never heard of them out here, are they a new tyre on the market ?
Thanks for your tip of 36 psi. heated they would be around 40 psi on the Tar.

Cheers P&J
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Follow Up By: mikehzz - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:56

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:56
Geolanders are Yokohama tyres. The HT are crap in my opinion but the A/T-S are an extremely good all round tyre.
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Follow Up By: P and JM - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 19:19

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 19:19
Thanks mikehzz, I just looked them up.
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Follow Up By: Sean C2 - Sunday, Apr 08, 2012 at 15:02

Sunday, Apr 08, 2012 at 15:02
Hey P&J

As stated previous they are a Yokohama tyre and I have the AT-S version really comfy tyre on the road haven't had the chance to take them off road yet. I am heading out on a quick couple of day trip next so will let you know how they go.

When buying these my two choices were the Cooper AT3 and the geolander and from reading reports (many of explore oz) I decided to go with the geolanders.

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Reply By: gbc - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 06:46

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 06:46
Try googling up the differences between metric P and LT rated tyres. Your haven't nominated what each of the tyres in your story are, so already you could have a 10 psi difference.

Short answer - there is NO easy answer to your question. Optimum tyre pressure changes with load and road type.

As a general rule, an LT rated tyre will need 8-10 psi MORE than a passenger rated tyre of the same size, to carry the same load. Hence the ridiculously high sounding pressures being bandied around on 4wd forums. 30-34 is heaps for a P metric tyre carrying a lightly loaded patrol. I'd be adding at least another 8 PSI if your tyres are prefixed LT.
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Reply By: Jol Fleming - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 13:01

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 13:01
use the measurement method re tyres, no guess work, ive got a page on it
http://www.direct4wd.com.au/tours/TYRE%20PRESSURE.htm

any questions plese post them,

cheers JOL FLEMING
0408485641
AnswerID: 482467

Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 21:00

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 21:00
lift your game JOL the link dozent work nick B.....LOL
Cheers Nick b
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Follow Up By: Jol Fleming - Sunday, Apr 08, 2012 at 14:25

Sunday, Apr 08, 2012 at 14:25
http://www.direct4wd.com.au/tours/TYRE%20PRESSURE.htm

try this or copy and paste it,, cheers Jol
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Monday, Apr 09, 2012 at 09:03

Monday, Apr 09, 2012 at 09:03
thats a bit hard for a ex A/S auto wrecker......Jol LOL
Cheers Nick b
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Reply By: GimmeeIsolation - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 16:36

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 16:36
The ONLY way to get it right is as a few others have said, the 4psi rule.
As everybody carries different weight you cannot just listen to Joe Blogs who says "this much".
Also just keep an eye on your tyres for even wear across the tread as time goes by and the 4psi rule will treat you and the tyres kindly.
My car is independent suspension all round and supposedly tyres wear uneven but I rotate and stick to the 4psi rule and everything wears even across the tread always. I live remote and my country driving is above 95% easy, always fully loaded in a very heavy car.
This question keeps coming up just about every week.

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Follow Up By: Member -Dodger - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:03

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:03
For 4wd tyres it is 6psi rule.

I run my patrol when not loaded at 30psi and raise to 35 when loaded then to 40psi on rear when towing the van and loaded.

I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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Follow Up By: GimmeeIsolation - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:19

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:19
You seem to know something the bloke who is the Western Australia state importer for Mickey Thompson/Coopers does not know.
Thats my last input because it really is a can of worms, you stick to six and Ill stick to four. Its worked for me for the last thirty years living up north here.
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Follow Up By: gbc - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 18:55

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 18:55
6 psi is for LT rated tyres - so much confusion.

Even then you'll find tyres on the sunny side are higher etc - it is a very rough rule of thumb at best, not the science some make it.
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Follow Up By: Member - nick b - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 21:14

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 21:14
Question: are you talking cold or running pressure I.e hot !!!!
Cheers Nick b
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Reply By: P and JM - Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:09

Saturday, Apr 07, 2012 at 17:09
Thanks all for your replies etc. going to keep going as I am with another couple of pounds and that's all.

As I always knew; it boils down to a "personal choice", but I don't like rough rides so will play with pressures for a while.

Cheers P&J
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