Another scam this time using Telstra

Submitted: Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 15:27
ThreadID: 94981 Views:4695 Replies:9 FollowUps:18
This Thread has been Archived
Got and E Mail today looking very professional claiming to be from Telstra saying "failed to process your last payment for Telstra Account " with a link to Telstra Billing and Accounts. Not thinking I clicked the link and it brought me to billing asking to confirm account details etc.... and credit card authorisations and numbers. This looked all the world like the official Telstra site but as soon as they asked details etc.. I smelled a rat.
Rang Telstra and sure enough was a scam that they had discovered yesterday and they had reported it.

Don't get caught and give any details over the link.

Cheers
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Boo Boo (NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:10

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:10
Rod

Thanks for the heads up.

AnswerID: 483464

Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:14

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:14
Rod, run a malware scan on your computer, now that you've clicked the link. It's entirely possible the scammers have downloaded a keystroke logger program to track your keystrokes and obtain your passwords, account numbers, etc. I use Malwarebytes, it's free, it's comprehensive, and it works a treat.

Thanks for the prompt advice and scam details. Alerting as many forum users as you can, quickly, and spreading the word fast, is the way to beat these scumbags.

Cheers - Ron.
AnswerID: 483466

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:37

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:37
I second Rons' suggestion. Would run a trojan scanner now.
0
FollowupID: 758723

Follow Up By: NTVRX - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 10:06

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 10:06
Hi Ron, I tried malwarebytes free download & they are asking $29.95 pay by credit card or paypal!!! Have I gone into the incorrect site? Really don't mind paying but a little confused I have not virus protection....just run out Can you PM me or hooddb@westnet.com.au Thanks Rob
0
FollowupID: 758768

Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 11:04

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 11:04
G'day Rob - Malwarebytes comes in two versions, free and paid. The free version you have to do computer hard drive scans manually, the paid version does the scans automatically. The paid version comes with technical backup and additional features.

Most of these crowds always want you to cough up some $$'s. You have to be alert to how subtle they are, at diverting you to the "pay" section of their sites.

One also has to be aware that Google will sometimes find scam sites that are posing as AV sites, too.
Always download freeware from well-known, "trusted partner" sites, such as Cnet or PCWorld.

The correct price for Malwarebytes Pro is $24.95. The price you have been quoted appears to have an added sum of $5 for a CD backup disc, which is offered as an option on numerous sites.

You can get a 14 day free trial of Malwarebytes Pro by clicking on "Products" at the bottom left of the Malwarebytes homepage.
You don't have to buy Malwarebytes Pro if you don't want to. The free version of Malwarebytes is quite effective - but you do have to remember to do hard drive scans manually, at regular intervals.

Be aware that Malwarebytes only targets malware, not viruses. As such, it needs an AV program installed as well, to function.
You can get numerous free AV programs, too - you don't necessarily need to purchase an AV program.

The difference between Malware & Viruses is subtle. All computer intrusions and corruptions are basically Malware - but Viruses are designed to replicate and infect on a large scale, mostly being just destructive and damaging.
Malware such as keystroke loggers and Trojans are designed to extract info from your computer, and send it to scammers.

Microsoft explanation & definitions of Malware & Viruses - http://technet.microsoft.com/library/dd632948.aspx

Malwarebytes forum discussion on the need for an AV with Malwarebytes - http://forums.malwarebytes.org/index.php?showtopic=69185

Free AV program; Microsoft Security Essentials - http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows/products/security-essentials

Malwarebytes; Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malwarebytes'_Anti-Malware

Malwarebytes website - http://www.malwarebytes.org/

Cnet download page for Malwarebytes - http://download.cnet.com/Malwarebytes-Anti-Malware/3000-8022_4-10804572.html?part=dl-10804572&subj=dl&tag=button

I hope this covers most of what you want to know. I'll send you an email as well.

Cheers - Ron.
0
FollowupID: 758775

Follow Up By: Member - Rodney B- Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 14:43

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 14:43
Thanks for that Ron. Did a backup scan with Malwarebytes as suggested (found 178 faults) and eliminated all recommended. These scams are getting quite sophisticated and I would doubt anyone could tell the difference from Telstra's site. Was an idiot and clicked the link as I was doing several things at once and didn't pick it straight away. Hopefully they were just looking for me to put my account details and credit card number in (which I didn't of course.)
0
FollowupID: 758803

Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 19:23

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 19:23
Rodney

No legitimate business will EVER ask you to confirm account or any other personal information by email.

I also have Malwarebytes free edition but it is NOT a preventative AV application as someone has already pointed out and should not be used in lieu of a good AV and firewall. There are huge risks to your computer if you rely on something which tries to fix problems after the event. There's plenty of reasonable AV freeware around. If you're looking for a very good commercial AV app I can recommend Kaspersky.

Can't get the EO hyperlink to work but here are some AV test results which may be handy if you're looking for AV protection:
http://www.av-comparatives.org/en/resources/surveys

0
FollowupID: 758847

Reply By: Life Member - esarby (NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:28

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:28
There is another running around. It's purported to be from Netbank (the commonwealth bank) it says that your statement for your MasterCard A/C ****-****-**** 5778 is now accessible on line. It is a scam as everyone has the same A/C number. I have reported it to the Commonwealth Bank but I have not heard back from them yet. The golden rule is if you do not know who sent it trash it.


Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 483467

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:35

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:35
"The golden rule is if you do not know who sent it trash it. " - wouldn't even rely on that as many phishing scams can emulate service providers sites .. any email that requests you to provide name, account & password is bogus. Even then service providers wont do this stuff via email.

It's a phishing scam. From wikipeadia:

Phishing is a way of attempting to acquire information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication. Communications purporting to be from popular social web sites, auction sites, online payment processors or IT administrators are commonly used to lure the unsuspecting public.
Phishing is typically carried out by e-mail spoofing or instant messaging, and it often directs users to enter details at a fake website whose look and feel are almost identical to the legitimate one. Phishing is an example of social engineering techniques used to deceive users, and exploits the poor usability of current web security technologies

Delete it.
0
FollowupID: 758722

Follow Up By: Member - Josh- Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 21:22

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 21:22
I agree Scott M, We received an email recently from a friend (so I thought). I opened it and it was a link to a website for dating. You put in all your personal info and they find your soul mate.
2 minutes later I get another email (from the real person) saying "I did not send the previous email. I will not be using this email any more".
Some one had got into her email and used her email account to send out emails to everyone on her email list using her email. Scary that they can do that. Just cause it's from someone you know doesn't always mean it's safe.
Did anyone see the story on tv with the reporter driving around with a guy from internet fraud squad accessing peoples internet in their house using a gizzmo (technical name) to access it from the car on the street.
Don't you love technology.

Josh
0
FollowupID: 758747

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 22:08

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 22:08
And this is exactly the reason that we do not use wireless at all. No mobile link and only cabled ethernet inside the house.

The wireless system is a synch to break into with the right tools.

I would also recommend NOT having preview on. Once certain emails are open the behind the scene rat bag can glen info from your disk. And then if one is stupid to actually click on a link whoops there goes the bank balance. Right click on the unopened email and read the source data to see if it is a scam.

Phil
0
FollowupID: 758751

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 11:34

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 11:34
Wireless isn't necessarily bad, the issue is that a lot of people don't password protect or secure their service.

You don't need any high tech gizmo to detect unsecured wireless services, I work in a CBD in Sydney, and my laptop has a wireless modem, and I quite often for amusement get it to detect any wireless services within range. You would be surprised how many pop up without any security protocols set. Used to work next door to a private girls school, and they had half a dozen wireless routers around the school, none of which were protected. Could have logged on to their service and created mayhem if I was so inclined....

0
FollowupID: 758778

Reply By: Life Member - esarby (NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:54

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 16:54
I just did a scan of C/ Drive and cam up with the following. These are all attacks since I booted up an hour ago. I just shows what is out there trying to dig into your computer.

I am glad the I have Norton 360 Version 6x.

You must wonder what they get if your computer is not fully protected.


___________________________
Threat Details
Threat type: Tracking Cookies. A tracking cookie is a file that can track your computing activities.
____________________________

____________________________
Tracking Cookies
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@ads.crakmedia.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@statcounter.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@ad.yieldmanager.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@ru4.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@112.2o7.net/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@mediaplex.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@casalemedia.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@fastclick.net/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@revsci.net/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@quantserve.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@msnportal.112.2o7.net/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@toplist.sk/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@statse.webtrendslive.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@tap2-cdn.rubiconproject.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@toplist.cz/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@adserver.adtechus.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@adultfriendfinder.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@c.atdmt.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@rubiconproject.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@go.com/
Removed
Tracking cookie: Cookie:steve@tribalfusion.com/
Removed
____________________________

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 483468

Follow Up By: Ron N - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 17:18

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 17:18
Esarby - Those cookies are relatively harmless, they're just mostly marketing cookies tracking the sites you've been visiting. You might know how it works.
You look at, say, "Engel fridges" for sale on various sites - then a few hours later, you get this amazing offer for fridges from some crowd such as Groupon, Amazon, or Catch of the Day!

This is BIG business, this tracking your sites you've visited. It runs into mega-millions in dollar terms.
The big retailers pay good money to find what you might be buying next.

The real problems are the viruses and trojans that are designed not to be found. They have file names that imitate genuine Windows files that your computer needs to operate. These crooks who design these things spend every minute of their lives figuring new ways to scam you.

I've found the greatest problem with AV programs such as Norton is that they are retro-active, not pro-active. In other words, a scammer has to invent a virus or Trojan, and then send it around the 'net - and then it has to be discovered by Norton, and a "fix" issued for it.

Accordingly, these people are behind the 8-ball at all times. I also dislike the way Norton tries to take control of your computer excessively - and it also slows your computer down.

The best AV's are the ones that alert you when something suspicious is being downloaded - and it blocks the download, and awaits your approval to download it.

I found Malwarebytes is excellent for malware - and Tall Emu's Online Armor is the best for stopping suspicious activity and viruses. Malwarebytes constantly warns me when a site is trying to download malware, and blocks it automatically.
A little pop-up window just says "Malwarebytes has blocked a malware download from this site (that I just clicked on)".

Online Armor blocks downloads that you haven't downloaded before, or marked as "safe" by you, and it lets you see what file is being downloaded. You can mark the file as safe if you know it's O.K., or reject it if it looks suspicious.
It gives you vast amounts of details that let you know what's going on, in real time, not 5 or 10 days after, as a lot of other AV's do.

Cheers - Ron.
0
FollowupID: 758732

Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 17:00

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 17:00
I got a good one the other day. The old classic about "there has been unauthorised activity on your ANZ banking account, and your account has been suspended until you log in again and provide your account and password details for verification".

The funny part is, I don't have any banking accounts with the ANZ! It had all the logos and correct bank contact details, lifted straight off an ANZ page - but the highlighted "live" link was the giveaway.

No-one in ANY large corporate organisation with security, such as banking, gives you a highlighted link to click on, in any correspondence.

Saw one the other day that the sender was chuckling over. It was an ANZ scam letter - but the heading was "Commonwealth Bank"!!

DUH-H-H!, as Homer would say! LOL
AnswerID: 483469

Follow Up By: Life Member - esarby (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:02

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:02
Ron.

Ron.
I cannot agree with you on the question of wireless. I have been using wireless for ten years now, with Telstra. Over that time I have never had an attack (Malware or Trojan) get into my system. I have always used Norton three sixty and updated it as new versions came available. I have set it to work in the back ground as soon as I boot up and run whenever the computer is idle. New definitions are automatically downloaded as they become available, which in on a daily basis, not every two or three days. I know this as I manually run it on a regular basis and I get three or four downloads each time. I run Telstra's Sierra wireless 4G and never find that it slows the computer down. I have heard that a lot of people say that it makes your computer run slow. On checking with them it is their processor that is causing it to run slow, plus the fact that they are loading too many program at start up or they have an old version or drivers running. I am very happy with Norton V 6 as it covers everything that I need to cover. Anyone that has Version 5 can download Version 6 for free. Just click on Support. Check for new versions. And it will update automatically.
Cheers.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 758780

Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:24

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:24
Esarby - You've got the wrong bloke, I never said anything against wireless connection.
However, I must admit - I ,too, am a little concerned about how much easier it must be to hack into a wireless network, if you're so inclined.
I have tried to see how many unsecured connections there are in my area with my laptop - but I haven't found any yet, they all seem to have their security measures in place.

Cheers - Ron.
0
FollowupID: 758788

Follow Up By: Life Member - esarby (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:37

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:37
Ron N. Sorry about that one. That is the main thing about it Security. You cannot have enough. My wireless has a new IP address on log in. But there again those mongrels out there will still find a way of getting in if you let them. Cheers.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 758792

Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 18:36

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 18:36
We have also had a lot of phone calls from overseas call centre saying they are Telstra and we owe them money for an overdue account. We use a different provider.

Motherhen
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 483477

Reply By: Saint Kev - Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 20:51

Wednesday, Apr 18, 2012 at 20:51
The last 2 Indian accent callers have hung up on me.
Talk about rude.
AnswerID: 483494

Reply By: vk1dx - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 08:38

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 08:38
I am going to be shot for this but here goes.

For years, more than a decade, we have been told at the pub, on TV, in the papers and via the radio to be careful of crooks, scamming and viruses. Yet some thick brained fools still get caught. I wonder which planet these people are on. Have they had their brains switched off for this long! Just leave your wallet on the table and make it easier for the crooks.

We are told to be wary of any email or link that takes you to a login page. The message here is to go to the site direct and NOT through a link in an email. These are usually the "problem with your account" type of emails.

We are told NOT to enable preview. The crooks can get into your computer and dump trojans and phishing application just by you opening in preview or reading your mail.

We are told to keep the cards in sight.

We are told to get and maintain a reliable virus detection application.

Personally I never use a pin number. I always sign. Also I shy away from ATMs. This is a bit hard for the majority of society now days. But we are told to cover the PIN so that no one can see it.

And yet some still get caught. I say bad luck mate. The warnings are everywhere.

I wonder how many remember this: "Let the buyer beware".

Phil (and its still bloody well raining here!!!)
AnswerID: 483516

Follow Up By: Member - Boo Boo (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:06

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:06
Yeh it is really bad luck when you take all those precautions and they can still get to you.

I have had my credit card compromised twice in 18 months.

The first time was on the central coast nsw. Servicemen dressed as ANZ people told the service station their machine was faulty. They took the machine and replaced it with a shonky.

A week later they came back and swapped the chonky with the original which had been "repaired".

Not my fault.

Second time just recently at Goulburn. Just lucky my wife was browsing our statement a few days later and wanted to know why I had bought overseas airline tickets. The same day I bought petrol at Goulburn.

Again not my fault. The CC never left my sight.

So, some still get caught, it may not be there fault.



0
FollowupID: 758781

Follow Up By: Life Member - esarby (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:13

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 12:13
Phil. I do all my banking via the internet. My Credit Union has four way to activate my account. account Number, Pin Number, Picture Code and then scanned for safety. It does a Malware scan before I can open my account. My IP address is change very time I log in and have too log off before the security software will close. Plus I have a guarantee the any monies stolen is replaced if it is a genuine attack.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 758784

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 13:37

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 13:37
BooBoo I gather that you got your money back. I would not go back to either establishments and make sure to tell them so.

Esarby I do not do any banking. A few leftovers from Vietnam makes me a bit of a risk. She is better at it anyway. My wife gets paid with a cash cheque that she cashes and deposits some into the bank. Any other banking is done via the internet and also with an extra key generator as part of the password. So even if you were watching her type all the password in you would not get it right. Once used it changes immediately. From my work as a crypto tech ion the Army as soon as we heard about them we got two. One for ebay and Paypal and then more importantly one for the banking.

Paid in cash. Yep! And all legitimate. She made them legally stick to the employment contract taken out 20+ years ago that said cash. But allowed a cheque.

We do get attempts and warnings but they are taken care of with the virus application. It also does a 100% scan when turned on the first time each day.

I like stringing along the "We are from Microsoft Service Center and we believe there is something wrong . . . " phone calls. Then just put it on hold. My wife got one at work when the boss was listening. He called all the staff around to listen as she strung him along. Worked a treat as they all got the message LOUD and CLEAR.

We but try. Haven't had any problems as yet.

Phil (now its stopped raining again)
0
FollowupID: 758799

Follow Up By: Member - Boo Boo (NSW) - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 15:32

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 15:32
With the first episode my card was not used. It was one of thousands that had all the data stolen.

ANZ rang me on a sunday afternoon and told me the story and said they would cancel my card immediately and reissue a new one.

The second incident is still on going. When I get home from St George I have to sign a form and then I believe the charges will be reversed.

It's a real pain in the B....

I go to great lenghs to protect my card.

I even cover the keypad and touch type the digits in and even pretend to push a few extra buttons to confuse things. Even confuse myself sometimes. LOL

What I don't understand is why give you code for your card, but then insist you sign it.

0
FollowupID: 758808

Follow Up By: vk1dx - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 17:11

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 17:11
Hi BooBo

Not sure what you mean by: "What I don't understand is why give you code for your card, but then insist you sign it."

I did not initialise any code or pin number on the card. The only way it can be used is for me to sign. I have enough passwords and numbers to remember.

Was that what you meant?

Phil
0
FollowupID: 758821

Reply By: howesy - Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 19:09

Thursday, Apr 19, 2012 at 19:09
No matter what email you get, it is always wise NOT to use their link and instead manually go to the official website by manually entering in your address bar and navigate through it.
Most banks etc when you log in will soon give you a message if you need to update something.
AnswerID: 483578

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)