Tyre pressure monitors

Submitted: Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 07:47
ThreadID: 95012 Views:2580 Replies:8 FollowUps:4
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Hi all
Can anyone give me feedback on tyre pressure monitors.
At the moment " Tyre Dog" seems the best.
Want a unit to handle 8 sensers to cover car and caravan.
They appear to be $800/$900 but if they save 2 tyres they have paid for themselves
But happy to have your comments..


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Laurie

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Reply By: The Landy - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 08:09

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 08:09
Much has been written on the topic.

Following is a thread I initiated sometime ago, there are many others. I’ve also linked a blog from member Mick O..a very good write up.

In a nutshell, I think they are invaluable!



Tyre Pressure Blog - Mick O


Tyre Pressure Monitors - Thread 86683

The Landy....
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Reply By: Ozhumvee - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 08:59

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 08:59
Another vote for Sensatyre, internal sensors and very robust and reliable.
Peter
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Reply By: Bush Wanderer - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 10:25

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 10:25
Have had tyre dogs for 5 years. No issue with damage....I have sure given them the opportunity. Replacing batteries every 18 months to 2 years is a simple affair unlike the internal ones.
Good thing also is I can move them between my two trailers in just a couple of minutes, making their value even better.
BW.
AnswerID: 483635

Reply By: Mick O - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 10:59

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 10:59
Laurie,

I see that Bill has linked my TPMS review to his post. My review was based on several years use of both screw on cap type system (Tyre dog) and internal sensors (Sensatyre).

I cannot stress enough that your choice should be needs driven and influenced by the type of travel you intend doing. While I consider a TPMS and a small compressor as two absolutely essential items to have when travelling, their performance and quality can very greatly, as can the effect of external conditions upon them. Conditions experience in towing a van or trailer up and down the bitumen changes dramatically once you hit a dirt road or outback “highway”. If you have a need to change them about various sets of tyres frequently, or you use tubed tyres, valve cap transmitters are probably best. If you intend doing lots of outback miles on roads of average to poor quality, then internal sensors may be a better proposition for you.

Whatever you choose, a TPMS system is a sensible investment.

Cheers Mick



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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Member - Laurie S - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:22

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:22
Thanks Mick and others for your info.
We intend to travel across to the Kimberly's later this year and after blowing a tyre on the Birdsville track last year these monitors seemed like a great idea.
I rang Hannible!s? unit and they will have a stand at the Brisbane show so will look into them there as they will have a show price


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Follow Up By: Mick O - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:29

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:29
Good on you Laurie. The show's are often the best places to hunt a good deal up. The Owner of Hannibals is a bloke named Peter Spowart and he usually does all the shows so mention EO and he'll look after you I'm sure.

Cheers Mick
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trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Reply By: vk1dx - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:28

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:28
We looked at them.

But with two complete 5 wheel sets including tyres and rims which we change depending on where we are going, we said no and just keep an eye on the tyres. You will soon know if one is going down on the car by the "different" feel to the car. We don't tow so I won't comment there.

Phil
AnswerID: 483643

Reply By: Motherhen - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:47

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:47
We would go the Sensatyre way if getting something fitted. Temperature monitoring is another benefit of an internal system. However we have continued to just be vigilant and have only had one blow-out in around 50,000 kms of towing travel (eight wheels all up) so a very lucky run.
Motherhen

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Reply By: Siringo - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:53

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 11:53
A mate has a set of them, brand unknown. One problem he had was that when he let his tyres down to under 15psi they kept going off as they thought his tyres were flat. The only way to get around the problem was to turn them off (or whatever you do to shut them up).

Could be something to look out for?
AnswerID: 483649

Follow Up By: Mick O - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 14:01

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 14:01
Siringo, both of the types of tpms mentioned by Laurie are fully adjustable. You can set High and Low pressures and temperatures. I know that Sensatyre can be set as low as zero for pressure to avoid alarms at times when running the tyres at extremely low pressures.

Cheers Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Siringo - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 15:41

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 15:41
Well that's good to know. I don't know what brand my mates were/are. Just thought it was some useful info for anyone looking at buying some, I'm sure there are a quadzillion brands of these things.
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Reply By: Dust-Devil - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 14:03

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 14:03
Laurie

I have a set of 8 Tyredogs plus the Relay unit.

(1) Use them on Caravan and Camper Trailer

(2) Obviously change them between between both units and towing vehicles.

(3) I originally used the locking devices and found them to be time wasting, bitching, useless pieces of crap designed to make one feel that the sensors were secure from theft. Maybe by a 3yr old. So piffed them.

(4) Very easy to change between vehicles and towed rigs.

(5) I sit the relay in the back of the Tow vehicle in an elevated position where it can 'see out' and have never had a problem in this position. Did experience hiccups in the beginning with it sitting on the floor of the tow vehicle.

The instructions/directions recommend that the relay is placed outside underneath the front of the rig being towed. That however becomes a semi permanent fixture to one rig and exposes the relay to damage and theft.

(6) The relay is either 12V or AA battery powered (4 x AA from Memory) and the monitor is the same with 2 x AAA.

(7) The sensors have a flat lithium battery which I personally change every 12 months and are dirt cheap from JAYCAR as well as readily available else where.

(8) The sensors have an O-ring seal to the battery/electronic area which have never given me any trouble. Also my valve stems are rubber which in conjunction with the sensors have seen no loss of same (YET anyway LOL)

(9) There has been mention of 'sleeping' sensors which I have experienced and thought it was a dead battery. However, I have found that if I drive the subject wheel over a kerb or through a pothole at a slow controlled speed, this varies the tyre pressure enough to wake the sucker up. I haven't experienced loose/dirty contacts yet as I change the batteries annually and check for same.

(10) I had a set of internal tyre monitors fitted to my Troopy many years ago which were good, however, every time there was a tyre rotation or puncture causing an exchange of the spare wheel the monitor reading/s were all skew-wiff as the monitor checked each tyre on a clockwise rotation basis.

Then a battery died that just caused all sorts of grief due to the fact - that to replace it you had to damage/destroy the sender unit to get it out. This may have changed for newer units of this type. Also I could not get a replacement sender unit for the setup I had.

There you have it.

Tyredogs were the only ones of their type available when I purchased them, however there are other brands available these days.

I have used both and the External type with relay now suit my purpose/situation perfectly.

As Mick O says - choose the type that fits you your needs.

Regards

DD
AnswerID: 483661

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