Cooking bread in a camp oven

I want some advice about cooking bread in a camp oven. I cook bread in our Cobb, but will be experimenting with a camp oven and fire during my daughter's school camp-out and want to end up with something edible for the kids! I will be cheating and using the Laucke single breadmix packs. Do you line the camp oven with anything? Is there a problem with the bottom of the bread burning - if so, how do you prevent it? How long does it take to cook? etc.
Thanks!
Leanne
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Reply By: Crazy Dog - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 19:58

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 19:58
Havva squizz here...Bread of all types in camp ovens


Grrr!!!
AnswerID: 483692

Follow Up By: Member - Leanne W (NSW) - Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 07:34

Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 07:34
Thanks for that - a great site!
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 20:51

Friday, Apr 20, 2012 at 20:51
Hi Leanne,

First of all, you are not cheating at all in using the Lauke pre-mix.
That is exactly what I use, the Crusty White to be precise.

No need to line the camp oven with anything.

For consistent results, I use heatbeads for the camp oven as I can control the amount of heat better.
I have a Hillbilly Bushking camp oven which is about 12 inches diameter at the base.

Firstly, fire up sufficient headbeads based on this formula.
Measure the diameter of your oven. Let's say it is 12 inches.
Start off with 10 headbeads underneath the oven and 14 on top of the lid.

I use an old frypan to place the heatbeads in with the camp oven sitting on a cake stand to allow a small gap underneath to aid air circulation. This will stop the oven smothering the heatbeads and provide an even heat.

Next, place a trivet in the oven (or another cake stand if you don't have a trive)t.
This keeps the base of the bread tin off the bottom on the oven so the bottom of the bread doesn't burn.

Put in the bread tin containing the risen dough and place the lid on top.

Arrange the other heatbeads on top of the lid and the cooking process is underway.

After about 15 mins, lift the lid and check that the top of the loaf is not "burning".
If there is signs of burning, remove a few heatbeads to lower the top temperature.

After 25 mins, check the loaf by rapping it with your knuckles. If it sounds hollow, it is ready, otherwise leave a little longer.

30 mins should be enough to cook the dough through.

When removing the bread tin from the oven, tip upside down and shake gently to remove the loaf from the tin.

Allow to cool for a bit, then cut the loaf and savour the delicious aroma and taste of your own cooked bread. The crust is crisp and the dough should be evenly cooked if it was allowed to rise sufficiently before starting the cooking process.

Do one or two loaves before the school cookout to determine the corrent amount of heatbeads to use top and bottom.

With verry little practise you will be soon turning out loaves of bread that simply won't last. It will all be gone.

A little tip.
If by chance you have some bread left over after the initial consumption. Try toasting it the next morning and place an egg or two on top.
The crispness will come back and you will have the best eggs on toast you have ever tried.

Go to it girl!

Bill


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Follow Up By: Member - Leanne W (NSW) - Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 07:45

Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 07:45
Wow Bill!
What a detailed reply! I won't have any excuse for turning out a bad loaf now.
Thanks for your help. Much appreciated!
Cheers
Leanne
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Follow Up By: 178 - Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 11:00

Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 11:00
Thanks for that. Johnno
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Reply By: Kris and Kev - Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 08:04

Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 08:04
Hi, we also use the Laucke breadmix packs, as in a lot of remote places you can only buy white frozen bread. So great to have multigrain, wholemeal, german rye etc. When cooking either bread or damper, we have bought a trivet for the bottom of our camper. Saves it burning on the bottom. It is all trial and error. If there is any advice I could give, go for less heat than more. And yeah, makes the best toast the next day. Next trip, we will take a rectangle cake/bread tin to cook it in as well, just to have more uniform slices and maybe make it go further:)
Kris
AnswerID: 483717

Follow Up By: Member - Leanne W (NSW) - Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 08:19

Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 08:19
Thanks Kris,
I will definitely experiment over the next week using less heat and a trivet.
Thanks for your help!
Leanne
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Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 14:40

Saturday, Apr 21, 2012 at 14:40
Kris,

I have used rectangular cake tins and silicon molds but have replaced then with a proper bread tin available from bread makers supply shops.

I now get a full sized loaf of bread. They are not cheap but worth the investment I believe.

Bill


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