"The Long Ranger" fuel Tanks

I recently got a Long ranger 140 Litre raplacement tank for my Toyota Hilux (Diesel) and was shocked that it only took 120litres to fiill up at the first trip to the servo.

I was on empty with the fuel light on when I arrived to workshop to get it installed so There was definately not 20 litres in the Tank.

I was told that the fuel gage would start to move at what was previously the 70L mark and I had only travelled about 410km by the time that had happened which is below the normal 550km's I would get out of 70 litres of diesel.

After to the installed he told me that is about 14~15 litres sitting in the tank as a sediment control and that there was likely 5 litres in there from previous tank however I still don't think its adding up with the mileage I am getting.

Has anyone else had one of these tanks installed?
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Reply By: GrumpyOldFart - Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 22:28

Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 22:28
I don't have a Long Ranger but I think all long range tanks are measured by their volume. i.e. length x width x height = litres. Subtract baffles, air space & etc and you get useable volume which is less.

My Outback 4x4 tank was 170 litres but took 153 litres to fill from dry. I could get to the bowser running on my main tank so I know it was dry from when I fitted it.

So don't panic but I wish they would quote useable capacity and not volume it would stop confusion.

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AnswerID: 485318

Follow Up By: rcam - Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 22:32

Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 22:32
Yeah I was told that a 180l tank is closer to 165l when filled by the guys in the shop too.


Yeah you don't buy a new car with a 70L Tank and only get 63L capacity in it, surely they should adhere to the same regulations.
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Reply By: NTVRX - Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 23:11

Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 23:11
I had a 60 ltr LRA tank installed & I can get 60.58 ltrs according to bowser meters. I was told by LRA that when the red light comes on the tank is empty so I was to make sure the pump was not operating dry.
AnswerID: 485319

Reply By: fisho64 - Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 23:48

Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 23:48
you dont say which model Hilux, but I have had a LN106 and KZN165 with Longrangers fitted. What they said about the gauge is correct, its simply not possible to get the arm into a full arc for accurate measurement. I removed one of my tanks and welded up a leak, also checked the sender unit.
Just because the fuel light is on, does not necessarily mean its bone dry-only one way to check that. Run it til light on then disconnect fuel line andlet it drain til doesnt suck anymore.

Also, as the tanks are quite long and flat at the bottom, itd be very unwise to run it too low as a moderately steepish downhill run will see all the fuel move forward away from the pickup.
AnswerID: 485322

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 23:56

Tuesday, May 08, 2012 at 23:56
I had a Long Ranger 180 litre tank fitted to the Troopy by ARB in July 2011.

As part of the fitting procedure they require to fill the tank with diesel to check for leaks and charge me for the fuel cost.

The presented invoice included a receipt from the service station for 180.23 litres of diesel at $265.

So it seems mine does contain 180 litres. Of course, I may not be able to draw the full 180 litres from the tank via the fuel pump.

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Allan

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AnswerID: 485323

Reply By: GT Campers - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 09:15

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 09:15
Yes: Ive had a Long Ranger (The Newcastle NSW built ones) in a Nissan WD21 Pathy and it usually took 135+ litres on a 140L spec day-to-day, with the light well and truly on.

The car's OE fuel gauge references from the floor level of the tank NOT tank volume: it measures the height of the fuel remining in the tank so with a bigger tank, there is more stored fuel above the 'high tide' (full) level the gauge reads. So, the gauge will show 'full' for longer (it won't move), and your low fuel warning light will come on with a larger quantity of fuel remaining than with an OE tank. Like, as much as 20+ litres

A few percent from spec doesn't worry most people - temperatures and retail fuel pump calibration issues can alter the "actual" volume you think is being put in the tank. My Pathy had 19-20L remaining the instant the light came on - measured by draining as part of a vehicle preparation regime, not by guessing. If this concerns you - it interested me for remote area travel - maybe you could do the same, just so you know what the actual level is when the light comes on.

My current Hilux (OE tank) has at least 10L remaining when the light comes on - I can drive at least 70km without running dry. So you MAY have had that much in yours when you arrived at the workshop[...but who re-uses old fuel?

Who fitted yours? I'm sure LR specifies the tank be filled at installation to check for leaks etc

Tactfully said, maybe you could live with this tank a little longer before expressing your "shock" at Long Ranger's decades-long history of quality tank supply.

Let us know how things pan out over the next few tanks!



AnswerID: 485337

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 13:32

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 13:32
I agree with GTC about Long Ranger's reputation. When they say "140 litres" I would confidently believe that is the liquid fuel capacity from a bone-dry tank to full. Trying to determine the tank capacity by calculating from driving and consumption is very inaccurate.

Rcam, if you really want to verify the tank liquid capacity you would need to drain the tank via the drain-plug then accurately measure the quantity of fuel to fill the tank. Whilst doing this you would also be able to determine how much fuel is required to extinguish the low-fuel lamp and also the gauge indications as the tank is filled.

In my own case as a test, I continued to drive after the low-fuel lamp came on until the engine starved. This was about 50km so I now know how much reserve I have below "empty" indication.
In the other direction, with an absolutely full tank I drive about 100km before the gauge starts to move down from the top stop which is satisfactory. The overall calibration is therefore fairly reasonable but I believe it more important to have the gauge and lamp most accurate at the lower end.

Incidentally, it was necessary to have an automotive engineer verify and issue a vehicle modification plate for the tank installation. I understand that it was his requirement that the tank be filled with fuel as part of his inspection. I would expect that Long Ranger would also specify this as part of the installation. If, as in my case, this were done the fuel fill would verify the tank capacity.

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Allan

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Reply By: Ozrover - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 09:20

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 09:20
The 166 litre Long Ranger sub fuel tank that I installed in my 80 series actually holds 180 litres, but stops transferring at 166 litres, it's nice to know that there is still 14 litres left in the tank in an emergency!

AnswerID: 485339

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 12:56

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 12:56
But how do you get to those 14 litres if it stops transferring. Guess you could drain it into a saucepan and tip it into the main tank? LOL

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Allan

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Follow Up By: Ozrover - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 14:10

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 14:10
Exactly,

Worst case scenario I can remove the drain plug & 3/4 fill a 20l jerry can wit it.

I've just removed mine to repair a tiny leak in one of the welds.

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Reply By: The Landy - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 13:41

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 13:41
I’ve got two in ‘The Landy’, a 120 litre, and an 80 litre. Both are pretty much spot on in terms of volume and useable fuel.

I don’t rely on the gauges or warning light for fuel, but have kept a fuel log which provides a long-term fuel use average. When I fill the tank I do a calculation as to the expected range adjusted by a factor of 10% - found this works best for remote area travel, and when I fill the tanks I back calculate to see if usage was at, or close to what I expected.
AnswerID: 485352

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 16:16

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 16:16
Not a bad idea.

As an add on if you are not doing it already, may I suggest that you calculate what the odo should read at 3/4, 1/2, 1/4. Compare the odo reading with your calculations. That way you may pick up any unplanned leak.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 16:21

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 16:21
Or even planned leaks!!! LOL

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Allan

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Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 17:06

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 17:06
I look at trees for planned leaks.
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Reply By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 14:34

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 14:34
We have a dual fuel (125 lt) and water (55 lt) Long Ranger and I damned sick and tired of trying to get the damned taint out of the water. Yes we have tried baking soda and the stuff from the caravan place. I would never, that's never, get one again nor recommend one. It has been filled and cleaned and emptied and rinsed at least ten times. And with the correct water approved hose and fittings.

And they wash (sic) their hands of you. They wont even recommend any specific treatment.

AnswerID: 485355

Follow Up By: RodH, Sydney - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 17:23

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 17:23
That is disappointing for you.

We have not had any issues with ours over an 8 year period - even though we now have a camper trailer the water from the Landcruiser's dual water/fuel tank is our preferred source of drinking water. Maybe we have been lucky because we certainly don't do anything special to maintain the water quality.
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Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 17:29

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 17:29
Two others that I know had the same problem. They just had to "ride it out". One cleaned up but the other after 12 months is still a little tainted.

You were lucky.
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Reply By: rcam - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 20:00

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 20:00
Look I am not asking the question to put any doubt over the company which has a long history to it, simply asking the question to see if it is common knowledge.

Doing a 5000k trip with a caravan in tow and whether or not to believe that there is abother 20l of diesel hiding away in a tank is pretty important to know sometimes.


I'll have run it bone dry and do a real test.
AnswerID: 485387

Follow Up By: GT Campers - Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 21:48

Wednesday, May 09, 2012 at 21:48
Good idea to test (as mentioned), but don't run it bone dry - run it around home until the fuel light comes on, the drain the fuel remaining in the tank into (for instance) a jerry can. That'll tell you what's "hiding".

Tip that fuel back in, then refill to provide a true measure of tank capacity, plus your 'reserve' after the Low Fuel light comes on. Hey Presto!

(Running bone dry can stuff up all sorts of things!)
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