NSW National Parks - (to be) Opened to recreational hunters

Submitted: Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 12:15
ThreadID: 95899 Views:2916 Replies:16 FollowUps:17
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I'm sure this will be of interest to many, both fore and against...

National parks in NSW will be opened up to recreational hunters as part of a deal between the Shooters and Fishers Party and the government to ensure passage of its electricity privatisation bill.

Premier's park hunting


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Reply By: Member - Jack - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 13:21

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 13:21
They will be hunting feral animals such as rabbits and feral cats and foxes. Sounds like a good move to me, if that is the key intention. A lot more humane than 1080, although on foxes I am pretty unmoved.

Could not give a damn about electricity privatisation.

Jack

The hurrieder I go, the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll-Alice In Wonderland)

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Reply By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 13:39

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 13:39
I'm not against shooting and hunting.
However having been in a National Park where shooting must be allowed (Coolah Tops), it is very disconcerting knowing there are bullets flying when you are camping.
Sensible shooters always think what's behind the target first, not everyone who shoots may be so sensible.
I would be much happier in a tent knowing they were Bowhunters or Pig Doggers
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Reply By: GT Campers - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 14:44

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 14:44
I am a fence-sitter on hunting /shooting but having heard all the feral pics in Kosciuszko National park a few weeks ago, this could be a good idea
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Follow Up By: Member - peter & dawn m (QLD) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 14:55

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 14:55
more pigs & goats in national paks than any thing else + plus rabbits & foxes as long as it,s controled properly.i worked down in perisher in 1964 their where a lot of pigs then . swampy
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Reply By: Member - eighty matey - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 15:20

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 15:20
I'm not a shooter but I agree that "very"controlled shooting in NPs is needed.

I reckon it's bureaucratic vandalism where NPs are locked up and feral animals take a foothold.

I just want to know if there's shooting in the park when I'm going there, so I can go somewhere else.

Steve
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Follow Up By: toffytrailertrash - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 17:32

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 17:32
It is very controlled with a special licence required and suitably qualified shooters/hunters for both firearms and bow hunting being allowed for the reduction of feral pests.
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Follow Up By: Charlie - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 22:21

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 22:21
The shooters already log into a website showing where and when hunting is happening and I'm sure public will be informed if their about, I can't see them out hunting rabbits, more likely wild pigs,goats or deer in the same manner National Parks people do already.
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Reply By: gbc - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 15:23

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 15:23
The state forests are open to shooting already and have been for some time. The system works well I think.
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Reply By: rags - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 15:33

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 15:33
Only problem will be they will need to walk in as most tracks have a locked gate, maybe the shooters should off pushed harder for the parks to be re opened to 4wds
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Reply By: Member -Dodger - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 17:38

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 17:38
I also agree with the decision to let shooters under license to eradicate feral animals as they have done much damage to surrounding properties.

And I also would not like to see the power system totally privatized, thinking of what Woolworth's and Coles have done to the small retailer.


I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

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Reply By: Member - Tony Z (NSW) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 18:44

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 18:44
Sounds good till someone's child gets shot bush walking with an errand bullet from a high powered rifle when the miss a shot and they do, some rifle's shoot over 500mts.
And as has been said not all shooters are responsible, who will control the alcohol they consume before going out for a shoot. Heard on the radio from the shooters party member that voted for the Electricity sale that the NP that are open for shooters will be open 24/7 and 365days a year
I work at a Power Station, the sale makes no difference for me as I'm close to retirement but think of the younger people. 3 billion for the sale (that's all) the Gov. gets 700,000+ back in dividends per year so 5/6 years and no more money coming in and your electricity bills sky rocketing, that's why they are going up now so they can make out that under private ownership its cheaper Ha ! look at Victoria sold off and the Gov. had to bale them out as all dividends went overseas and not on maintenance so they fell apart / blackouts it may happen in NSW.
Sorry about going on about this but it will hurt all NSW
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:15

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:15
Got a better chance of being hit by a stray bullet if you live in Sydney's west at the moment with the current bikie rubbish going on. Safer with the shooters in the Nat Parks as far as I am concerned. The thought that they will be shooting into camping areas etc is just too ridiculous to comment on. Of course it will be controlled.
Jack
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:32

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:32
Well said Jack
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: Teejay - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 20:34

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 20:34
Well said Jack x 2.
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Follow Up By: SDG - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 09:07

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 09:07
And as stated above, many state forest already allow hunters in, Vic more than NSW.

Whats the bet many of you did not even know they were in the area.
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Follow Up By: Madfisher - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 19:29

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 19:29
With the amount of large feral dogs roaming in packs now in the high country I am in favour of contolled hunting. A lot of flyfisherman have taken to carrying weapons for self defence .
Cheers Pete
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Reply By: The Rambler( W.A.) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:11

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:11
It's about time too as nearly all hunting in other parts of the world is done in state forests or national parks by licensed shooters with there being very few problems.I have been hunting for many years and like others find it quite difficult to access private property due to the ever increasing liability issues so this is a good move in the right direction as I am sure it will be done with the right control so that "the cowboys " don't get a free hand.Hope it catches on here in the West.
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Follow Up By: Member - Tony Z (NSW) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:55

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:55
I did not say that people will be shot in camping grounds, but what about the people that, as I said bush walk/ camp for days eg:- Blue Mountains Nat. Park / Koziosko Nat Park ?
Imagine walking in the Grosse Valley with shooters around. Professional shooters may be the way to go as they only hunt feral animals for pay!
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Reply By: Member - Redbakk (WA) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:17

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:17
It will never happen in WA that's for sure.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 23:15

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 23:15
Kalbarri np is a prime candidate for it that place is full of pigs. Goats and aheep
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Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:45

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 19:45
The problem with the Parks and wildlife service in NSW and I don't doubt in other states as well, is that they have way too much realestate and nowhere near enough budget to even manage it in anything but the least cost method.

This is why they lock them up because if they open them up they have to maintain access.Then safety issues come into it and the costs start going through the roof.

I used to be surrounded by state forests here where I live and Bob Carr decided to turn them over to National Parks as his parting gesture. Now they are all National Parks worst luck. They do nothing and just let the bush and the feral animals go wild. At least forestry used to manage it with controlled burn offs and regular maintenance of their fire trails. Not the Parks service. They are a disgrace.

Now the parks service is overburdened with real estate and underfunded to the extreme. Mind you, there is not the money in the public coffers to fund anything much at the moment, let alone a luxury like a National Park.

It is also about time they changed their names to State Parks of NSW before the feds take control of them. Get the "National" out of the name.

I say let the hunters in and charge them a fee for the privelidge, They will be happy and the parks will have additional income.

Bruce.
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Reply By: Member - Terry. G (TAS) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 22:29

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 22:29
ABOUT TIME THESE AREAS WERE OPENED UP FOR SHOOTERS i SAY,i ALSO GO TO THESE AREAS WITH MY CARAVAN AND AM NOT WORRIED ABOUT BEING SHOT BY SOME GUN WELDING HUNTER.i GOT THAT FEELING FROM A COUPLE OF COMMENTS TAR THEM AL WITH THE SAME BRUSH
Not many hunters fire before they identify their target so as a bush walker you are pretty safe Yes I AM PERSON THAT TOWS A CARAVAN AND STAYS IN N/Parks but also I am a hunter and I fire more ammunition making sure my rifle is accurate than I DO blase-ING away at bush walkers,street signs or cars I see parked in camping areas
Point being I think every one will be just as safe in parks with hunters as we all are now
Terry
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Follow Up By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 10:04

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 10:04
You're spot on Terry.

Most people shot while hunting were members in their own party.
No self respecting hunter wastes a bullet, and, most certainly identifies their target well before the rifle is lifted.

It will be tightly regulated you can bet so it will not be open to just anybody.
It will no doubt be carried out through tightly organised clubs under very strict conditions. It can only be a positive for the Parks system long term if properly managed. I have no doubt it will be.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Reply By: Wilko (Parkes NSW) - Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 22:40

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 at 22:40
Sounds like a good idea to me. I believe there's by a lot of feral animals in National parks. Who said this country had lost the plot.

Bet the greenys are hopping mad.

cheers wilko
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Reply By: Bazooka - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 00:44

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 00:44
I'm sure this came up on Exploroz a while back.

Professional licensed shooters have worked with parks for years. No problems with that but they are an entirely different species to recreational hunters irrespective of the so-called controls. Apart from their lack of verified shooting ability many of them wouldn't know a wild pig from a wombat or a feral cat from a quoll in the scrub. If it has fur or hair and moves that'll be good enough. The minimum requirement should be that they hire a professional licensed shooter as a 'guide'/overseer and organise their own indemnity insurance. If one of them has an accident, as a taxpayer I sure as hell don't want to have to pick up the tab for his/her medical expenses.
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Follow Up By: SDG - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 09:21

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 09:21
To be allowed to shoot in parks such as these you have to get an R licence.
In order to get this you need to be a member of either a bow hunting associationn, or a shooting associationn. Being a member of these gives you insurance.

You then need to do an exam identifying different animals, sexes and their kill zones. A pratical test is also required to display your accuracy. Passing this you apply to the game council, who can still say no.

Also from what I can understand, you need to book your time in the State Forests, so most likely this would happen in the National parks.


I'm going for my R licence eventually with Archery, different skills but just as deadly.
Above is my understanding of what is required.

Don't know about cost yet.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 11:17

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 11:17
Thanks SDG. A 4 year old can identify animals from a picture - far different from a hunter with adrenalin pumping looking for a kill in a National Park. People have mentioned state forests. Unfortunately as was said in the other thread on the same subject the usual bad element has abused that system by actually breeding and introducing ferals, some of which have no doubt taken refuge and bred up further in adjacent National Parks. As you might gather, I have zero confidence in a system which is administered or involves the "Game Council" and I've seen enough of recreational shooters to know the mentality of some of them. A minority no doubt but they're the last people who should be toting or using firearms.
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Follow Up By: Penchy - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 13:10

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 13:10
and all 4wd owners are mature and responsible members of the community. Saying shooters shoot at anything with fur is as accurate as my earlier comment. Ive met more redneck 4wd owners than I have shooters by 10-1 at minimum. More gates are pulled down in national parks by 4wd winches than anything else, and shooters are the irressponsible ones? As one of the previous posts mentioned, there is quite a bit involved in getting an r licence so every Tom Dick and Harry cant go into your local camp ground and start letting off some rounds. Poorly educated people like you, and the politicians that appear on quality journalistic programs like A Current Affair, purely pass on that poor information to the public.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 13:27

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 13:27
A member of the "well educated" Game Council no doubt Penchy. The one thing we agree on is that redneck 4WD owners or shooters are tarred with the same brush. Paul Hogan had the right idea in Croc Dundee.
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 14:11

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 14:11
And from the report in the paper today, which I've posted below, clarifies the who will be allowed, and is along the lines that Bazooka is suggesting...

Cheers, The Landy
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Reply By: The Landy - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 12:24

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 12:24
Further to my original post...

The New South Wales Environment Minister, Robyn Parker, has clarified who will be allowed to participate, noting it will only cover 79 of the State’s 799 National Parks.

Quoting

The NSW government's decision to allow shooters in national parks doesn't mean groups of blokes will be able to go hunting with their dogs on weekends, Environment Minister Robyn Parker says.

The government will allow feral animals to be shot in 79 of the state's 799 national parks after the Shooters and Fishers Party made a deal with the coalition to agree to the sale of NSW's electricity generators.

Ms Parker said allowing shooters in parks was an extension of a policy that already existed. She said hunting dogs remained banned "This is not recreational hunting," Ms Parker told reporters in Sydney on Thursday.

"What we do at the moment is contract licensed shooters ... targeting feral animals.

"This is not about a group of blokes going off for a weekend with their dogs, this is about extending our program using volunteers.

"These are licensed shooters, they will have to fit strict requirements in order to do this, they will be going in with supervision." The shooters will be monitored by park staff.

She also said a new interactive website and iPad App would inform visitors about cornered-off shooting areas.

Legislation to sell the electricity generators passed the NSW upper house on Wednesday night 20 votes to 17.

It now returns to the lower house for final assent, because of amendments agreed to by the coalition as part of the Shooters deal.

End Quote...


The story can be read here Power Deal Not a licence to hunt (SMH 31 May)



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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 13:14

Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 13:14
Hi

Sounds good to me.

Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

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Reply By: mountainman - Sunday, Jun 03, 2012 at 20:23

Sunday, Jun 03, 2012 at 20:23
this was covered on landline.
their has been controlled shooting in national parks recently, by private hunters who are members of the public, they are adhering to strict conditions, in company with park rangers present in NP vehicles.
its a brilliant program that saves the tax payer dollars that use the rangers knowledge of feral activity and of the hunters own time.
were paying for the ranger and the vehicle he drives, as he would be doing anyway.
the benefit is targeted shooting that is at little cost to the tax payer.

im all for this, as a very effective method of control, well part of one.

people rant on about this crap with NO knowledge of whats going on.
this is a brilliant idea that is bringing in brilliant results, and should be implemented australia wide.
the camel population is over 1million up north.
pigs wouldnt know their numbers.

in any fraturnity you have idiots who bring disgrace to the rest, some of my friends are that, and you cant argue with an idiot.

national parks have backed this, and i agree.

people drive, use fuell, buy drinks, meals at these small places and that brings money that wouldnt normally be their, on the towns they have to drive through to these parks.

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