Carrying a Chainsaw

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 13:24
ThreadID: 96131 Views:3769 Replies:14 FollowUps:24
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Hi all. I have just purchased a Tanaka 14inch petrol chain saw. What have owners of any brand found to be the better way to carry them when travelling. I wish to transport it in the back of a Prado so am thinking of possible fuel smell and chain oil leaking out. Also protecting the blade and the vehicle surrounds. Thanks in anticipation. Bob.

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Reply By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 13:25

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 13:25
Probably doesn't matter but it's actually a 16 inch. Bob.
AnswerID: 488011

Reply By: Hairs & Fysh - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 13:52

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 13:52
We bought a case, but a slight smell of fuel still drifts through the Cruiser.
It does stop bar oil leaking through the back and making a mess.
About 80 odd bucks for a Stihl case.

AnswerID: 488013

Follow Up By: Gnomey - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 15:54

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 15:54
G'day Bob.
Agree with H&F about the best solution for travelling. Husqvarna seem to make a hard plastic one too and it's a bit squarer so maybe easier to pack. They are awkward things.

Depending on harshness of ride, accessibility and frequency of use needs you might even consider detaching the bar and packing the rest in a small (padded) case with a more convenient shape. Only takes a few minutes to re-assemble.

I wanted a case to carry everything, including fuel, with bar enclosed for wood cutting expeditions so I made one out of ply. Big bugger of a thing for what you want though.

Cheers
Mark
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Reply By: Member -Dodger - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 16:24

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 16:24
As I have a roof rack I looked around and finally found a Plastic container that holds the chain saw fuel 4ltr and chain oil 1ltr plus spare chain and sharpening tools.
It is a tight fit but it all fits in well.
All are carried on the roof in the water tight container.
It's called an action packer.

I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.

Cheers Dodg.

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Reply By: Member - Bruce C (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 16:25

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 16:25
Hi Bob,
You could get one of those black plastic boxes from Crazy Clarks or The Reject Shop and cut a hole in one end to allow the blade and protector pass through so the end of the bar sticks out.

You can also keep a bag with the tools etc required for the chainsaw in it as wel as fuel containers for the saw. That way no mess on the Prado carpet. Low cost too and it wont roll around.

Cheers, Bruce.
At home and at ease on a track that I know not and
restless and lost on a track that I know. HL.

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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:18

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:18
Thanks Bruce. That's the kind of idea I was looking for. I will go shopping over the weekend and see what I can find. Cheers,Bob.

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Follow Up By: Member - Andrew (QLD) - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 20:13

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 20:13
Just adding to that idea, it is fairly easy and creates less smell and leakage if you remove the bar and chain to store it....only takes a minute to install if required. Better to have a sealed box IMO.

hope that helps :)

Andrew
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Follow Up By: prospect_or - Tuesday, Jul 10, 2012 at 21:56

Tuesday, Jul 10, 2012 at 21:56
Hey Bruce, That is exactly what I have done. Keeps everything you need for your saw together.
I do the same with my little Honda prospecting pump.
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Reply By: Member - Serendipity(WA) - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 16:48

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 16:48
I bought a chainsaw canvas bag that is cut to size of different chainsaws. It can carry the chainsaw fully assembled, 5litres of fuel in plastic container, blade spanner, sharpening bits, bar oil, two stroke oil and rags. Seems to seal it all in but yes you still get a slight fuel smell on hot days.

Serendipity





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Follow Up By: Andrew & Jen - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 14:29

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 14:29
Ditto
Use just an ordinary synthetic canvas zip top bag with a "hard" base - cheap from local discount store.
All the gear fits inside (as above)
Strapped into the roof basket within a strong plastic garbage bag to waterproof it while not in use.
No smells inside vehicle; readily accessible when needed.
Use in Vic High Country (and other places) for track clearance, occasionally for firrewood (usually use bush saw or axe)
Also have another one with dry firewood for starting / small fire for cooking when local wood is sodden.
Cheers
Andrew
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 18:23

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 18:23
I just leave mine at home!

Bill


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Follow Up By: River Swaggie - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:18

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:18
Hiya Bill

I would have been cactus a few times ive come across tracks with 2-3 trees down,One i would have to reverse at least 2-3 kms to turn around,hard to see with gear in the back..Others i wouldve had to turn around and go back,taking the best part of half a day at least....

As for coming across trees that others have just cut from tracks i say thanks guys...
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Reply By: Witi Repartee - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:03

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:03
Chainsaw??..Please tell me you don't have a generator as well.
I find a good bow saw is all we need for lovely camp fires, it doesn't drip oil or smell of petrol and is easy to store.
AnswerID: 488039

Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:41

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:41
Yeah, I know what you mean, but ever now and then we come across a tree down across one of the trails to our favorite spots and they are just a little too big for the axe.
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 19:05

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 19:05
Im hearing you Hairs & Fysh
-- but im not sure a chainsaw would have helped me either




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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:36

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:36
Looks like you guys need to carry one of these.

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Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 22:52

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 22:52
Have you ever tried to cut gidgee with a bow saw?

I had to once and that's why I always take the chauiny now,

Steve
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Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 07:57

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 07:57
get outmore,
Haven't come across one that big across a trail yet


Hey Bob,
That makes my little chainsaw look like a nail file, sheesh.

Well there ya go Steve,
Never heard of 'Gidgee" before, so I Googled it.
Gidgee (acacia cambagei)
I had heard of Stinking wattle before.

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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 09:26

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 09:26
Honey! Can you get the bow saw out of the trailer... probably the big one would better!! Thanks!!!


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Follow Up By: Hairs & Fysh - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 10:08

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 10:08
Hey Michael,
And whats wrong with yelling back to the mrs, who's been sitting in the 4wd patiently.
Sweetie, ya wanta grab the chainsaw for me please, oh can ya kick it over to please sweetie.

Works for us.

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Reply By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:27

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 19:27
Many thanks for your replies,even the chainsaw Police. I do have Solar panels. Funny thing, camped out at Illabo last month for a week with possibly two hundred other people. Three chainsaws ran for about 15mins on a couple of days and they were no where near as intrusive as one bloke's Honda that ran all day. Cheers,Bob
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Reply By: Member - Warren R- Karratha - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 20:18

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 20:18
G'day Bob
I carry the saw, fuel, oil & tools in a nelly bin with a slot cut out for the chain bar. This way if anything leaks it's all contained. Once it's all packed in the tub, I slip the whole thing into a big heavy duty plastic bag to contain the smells. My genny also goes into a bag. Works ok
Cheers, Waz
AnswerID: 488044

Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:27

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:27
Thanks Waz, but for us Easterners, what's a "Nellie Bin"? Bob
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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:28

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:28
Whoops, NELLY
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Follow Up By: Member - Warren R- Karratha - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 21:28

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 21:28
Sorry mate it's actually a Nally crate. Here's a link
http://www.plasticsandstorage.com.au/storage_medium.htm
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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 09:47

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 09:47
Got it now Waz. Thanks.
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Reply By: Ron N - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 21:02

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 21:02
Toyocrusa - I carry my 028AV Stihl with 16" bar in a steel ex-Army ammunition case, with a slot cut out for the bar and chain.
As I pop the saw in the box, I feed the bar through the slot, and then slip the Stihl plastic bar protector over the chain and bar.

However, the biggest problem I have, is that oil continues to seep out of the bar lube oil holes, and this goes everywhere - even despite lining the bottom of the ammo case with heavy cardboard to soak up the oil.

I'd recommend a fully sealed case that holds the entire saw and bar, and which allows for leakage to be fully contained.

Cheers - Ron.
AnswerID: 488049

Reply By: Member - Mary W NW VIC - Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 22:00

Saturday, Jun 09, 2012 at 22:00
If you carry a genny-carry an electric saw
chainsaw/reciprocating saw
Genny quiet/saw quiet
Cheers'
Mary
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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:20

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:20
Mary. Just worried that by the time we unpacked it all, carried it close enough to the timber, set it up, plugged it in and got the Geny going, someone with a petrol one would have knocked the tree off. lol
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Follow Up By: Member - Mary W NW VIC - Tuesday, Jun 12, 2012 at 21:53

Tuesday, Jun 12, 2012 at 21:53
All depends on your set up .my genny is readily accessabile -on slider set up in rear .of vehicle.Drive to wood or carry wood to assessable spot.
No noise -no worries
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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 08:28

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 08:28
I wonder how often you would use a chain saw. I carry two different size bow saws and its amazing what you can cut with a sharp bow saw. Most timber that falls is already dead and most suitable to cut by hand.. Less hassle and space and no smell.. My two bobs worth. Michael






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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:24

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 20:24
Where we camped Michael, the main supply of timber was old railway sleepers. The were some fallen trees which we did cut by hand on the smaller limbs for fire starters, but no way would you hand cut the sleepers. Same down at Echuca with the dead Red River gums. Cheers,Bob.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 09:24

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 09:24
You would almost need oxy-acetylene to cut those sleepers, tougher than steel!!! Michael


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Follow Up By: get outmore - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 11:10

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 11:10
why would you cut the sleepers? to be honest ive never cut even the longest branch - never even remotly had the need for a saw of any kind

all you do is start a fire and chuck your sleeper or branch on with the middle of it in the fire

fire wont often burn evenly but rather just burn above the hot spot in the middle, then as it burns through you snap the branch or sleeper and chuck them ijn the fire, do this several times for really long stuff

- perhaps people dont know much about fires?
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Follow Up By: Member - Toyocrusa (NSW) - Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 11:52

Monday, Jun 11, 2012 at 11:52
Maybe when you get to 66 yo and try to lift one you will realise getoutmore. They are also a bit long to fit in the back of a Prado and cart about half a K to where we were camped. We did exactly what you are saying with a half length and left the dead firewood for others that did not have a saw. Cheers,Bob.
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Reply By: spudseamus - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 13:45

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 13:45
Yes that oil and petrol mess is a problem --this is what a friend of mine did -- he only ever used the petrol chainsaw for firewood so he bought a cordless (Black and Decker) one with 2 batteries !! man can that thing cut firewood!! wonderful up to about 100mm dia. Happy days !
AnswerID: 488077

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 19:02

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 19:02
I've never seen any handsaw that can keep up to a chainsaw!
I always carry my chainsaw, particularly in timbered country - because many a time I've found my way blocked by a fallen tree - even on well used tracks - and using a handsaw to cut up a decent size tree, is a pretty laborious task!
AnswerID: 488108

Follow Up By: get outmore - Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 21:33

Sunday, Jun 10, 2012 at 21:33
agreed

texas chainsaw massacre just wouldnt have been the same if they had gone with the original title of
'texas handswaw massacre"

with the original script having a masked madman hacking off limbds with a woodsaw
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