Is the Drover's Day Gone

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 08:05
ThreadID: 96320 Views:2288 Replies:8 FollowUps:7
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I thought this might be of interest given many of us frequently travel stock routes on our adventures across Australia...

Is the Drovers Day gone

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Reply By: Croozerute - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 08:52

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 08:52
Thanks for that mate.

we were on a cattle station out of Winton, QLD, with a stock route passing through it, was still used fairly well, a few times through the year.
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 20:13

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 20:13
We came down a stock route last year to take a look at the Dick's Creek Hotel ruins which are onBendemeer Station outside of Winton. It is a great drive along the stock route and good alternative to those not wanting to take the highway...

Cheers, Baz, The Landy's
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Follow Up By: get outmore - Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 10:13

Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 10:13
was a few years ago but in the mid 90s I caught a lift with a guy from jundah to windoroh and his job was inspecting commons ( my memory is a bit hazy) basically land set aside along rivers and waterholes for cattle to lay up while droving
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Follow Up By: Croozerute - Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 19:16

Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 19:16
Cheers "The Landy" .. the stock routes are always a good alternative for a drive..
You can get a QLD stock routes map that has them all marked out too..
Oh, and nice people at Bendemeer too :-)

Gom, anyone in the shire can also pay to have a few head on the town common.. is handy for people that live in town to stick a few there..

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Reply By: Steve M1 (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 09:39

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 09:39
let's just hope the government don't just sell the reserves in yet another instant cash grab.
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Reply By: Member - a convict - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 10:32

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 10:32
Many thanks for that.

The link to the NSW Stock Route map within the SMH
piece is interesting too 'eh.

I must try and dig up the QLD detail.

..thanks.

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Reply By: Andrew & Jen - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 11:54

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 11:54
Thanks for posting this link.
The travelling stock routes and reserves are part of our heritage and need to be protected.
Unfortunately, there are too many people in our political system who know the cost of everything but the value of nothing. Economic rationalism run mad.
Cheers
Andrew
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Reply By: Member - Bob C (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 15:44

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 15:44
I hope they don't succeed with their selloff. the stock routes are part of our heritage and still play a vital part in times of drought.I have lots of memories of my droving days in my younger days in the west of NSW. Happy memories of the long paddock Cheers Bob


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Follow Up By: OutBack Wanderers - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 19:12

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 19:12
I remember about 30 yrs ago, a head-on smash closed the road. A farmer about 5 cars down called out to everyone listening, follow him, he took us on a stock route pararell to Pacific Hwy, ran for 5 klms, unbelievable the road was well looked after, we even glanced down past the smash, and watched those coming south not moving

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Reply By: Member - Kevin S (QLD) - Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 19:28

Sunday, Jun 17, 2012 at 19:28
If the campaign was being waged by farmers only then the outcome may be in the interests of the travelling public. But any 4WD owner who thinks that greenies are going to fight for his (or her) right to drive on these routes to find free camping spots should think again. Greenies will want them locked up so that they can be over grown and return to their natural state. The farmers taking part in this fight need to be careful what they hope for. So should every genuine lover of an outback that we can readily access.
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Follow Up By: The Landy - Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 10:52

Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 10:52
I think the term ‘greenie’ is used far too liberally these days, especially by the media, to invoke a certain response.

What is a ‘greenie’ ? At the mention of the word many assume it is a reference to the extreme ‘tree-hugging’ variety, matted hair, tambourine under one arm, hairy armpit under the other, chanting ‘save the koala’ as they wander the streets of Byron Bay...

But many farmers, if not most, are ‘greenies’ in the sense that they care for the land, ensure it is used in a way that is sustainable, and for the most part accessible to others. The Australian aborigines could be counted amongst our first ‘greenies’ when you look at the way they managed their surrounding land, which included burning it off when required to stimulate growth and to manage fire risk.

I suspect many who visit this forum are ‘greenies’ to some extend or the other. But it doesn’t mean it is always to the detriment are exclusion of others...

Regards, The Landy
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 12:13

Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 12:13
Well said Landy, but Kevin makes a fair point too. NSW has an unfortunate history of converting land into national parks and nature reserves, locking it up but not allocating nearly enough resources to manage it properly. The end result is land over-run with weeds, feral animals and fuel just waiting for a lightning strike to start a bushfire.

Kevin, its worth remembering that landcare - surely on of the most effective land management schemes - got going because "greenies" (specifically Phillip Toyne who was then the head of the Aust Conservation Foundation) got together with farmers (Rick Farley, then head of the National Farmers Federation) to lobby the Hawke government (Graeme Richardson was then environment minister) to set aside funding to get it all going.

That was back in 1989, and it all went very well for the next decade and a half. Unfortunately governments think that they can just drop the funding for succsessful programs and think that they will just roll on under their own steam. Wrong. If our current PM was really concerned to do practical things about climate change she would recharge landcare as a very cost effective and successful way to get everyone (not just farmers but city folk as well) involved in looking after our land. Doubt it will happen though.

end of rant for the day.

Cheers,

Val
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Follow Up By: Member - John and Val - Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 12:22

Tuesday, Jun 19, 2012 at 12:22
Meant to add that TSRs (stock routes) in NSW at least, have been under constant threat of being sold off for many years now, so this latest idea is nothing new. Many sections have been sold off over the years unfortunately. It used to be the case that adjoining farmers had first option to buy an adjoining TSR if it ceased to be used.

But it is well recognised that TSRs are excellent natural corridors, often with good biodiversity. With a bit of common sense they should not be difficult to manage, although weed control can be expensive.

If 4WD clubs sat down with the current managers you would think a win-win arrangement could be negotiated whereby 4WD clubs get access in return for agreed managment. I dont support unfettered 4WD access though. But often roads and TSRs run together and where that happens it makes for great driving and maybe camping too.

cheers,

Val
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Reply By: Kate5 - Monday, Jun 18, 2012 at 22:51

Monday, Jun 18, 2012 at 22:51
It's sad to think of stock routes disappearing and the drovers too. I care take a drovers house and have been on many trips with them.
It feels like stepping back in time when you sit around a camp-fire with 1500 head of cattle yarded up a few meters away for the night and the night horses saddled up in case the cattle rush in the night.
The stories transport you back to a place and time long past but knowing that you are travelling the same route can give you goosebumps.
I'm an ex pat Irish lass and love Australian history but find it sad to think how many people here know so little about their own country and things like droving and stock routes are disappearing due to lack of knowledge. Living in outback Queensland I'm privileged to be in the middle of it all, and think the so called "greenies" should get out of their air-con'd offices in the city and experience things for real not virtually or through computer models...
Just a bit of a personal opinion rant...
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Reply By: Rick (S.A.) - Thursday, Jun 21, 2012 at 23:01

Thursday, Jun 21, 2012 at 23:01
Good stuff, The Landy,
and a good retelling of it all.
Keep at preserving these routes.
It IS important
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