Comment: The ANZAC Legacy

I am pleased to see that this article is now allowed on this site. I know many years ago my comments on this matter were not welcomed on this site and as a result I resigned my membership on EO as a form of protest, but as Australia's death toll in Afghanistan has increased significantly it seems that thankfully management has had a change of heart and I thank them for that.
It just saddens me as an ex serviceman that we are still losing our men in Afghanistan in what seems to some is a futile exercise, but unfortunately its necessary for us to continue to enjoy the way of life we are so lucky to have in this country.
I salute each and every Australian who has made the supreme sacrifice in all conflicts that we have been involved in, and I do this not just on ANZAC Day, but each and every day.
Lest we Forget
Finding this article on here is very relevant at the moment as I am in Darwin and even though I have been here before with the military, my wife has never been here, but her father was here during the air raids by the Japanese in 1942/3 and going to the new Defence Of Darwin exhibition as well as some of the old WW2 defence sites has given her a new appreciation of what her father endured up here.
Its also relevant to me because on the way here we stopped at the War Memorial in Canberra and I donated my aunts WW2 diaries and photo's from when she was in the Middle East as a nurse. I also had an uncle who served in New Guinea with the army and both my parents were in the RAAF, although they did not serve overseas.
Once again, a big thank you to whoever was responsible for allowing this article on this site.
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Reply By: Member -Hilton Hillbillies - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:18

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:18
Waking to the news of the loss of another brave Australian solder saddened
me greatly.
As an ex serviceman, I welcome your comments and thoughts.
We should think about and be grateful to all those that have served this wonderful country, so that we may live and enjoy our freedom.

To all that have served thank-you.

Cruiser, I'm glad that you and your wife are enjoying your trip and that you both have been able to visit where her father served.

Regards
Steve

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Reply By: mylestom - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:41

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:41
To family and friends my deepest sympathy.

We that have served respect your final sacrifice.


"Lest We Forget"


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Reply By: Bonz (Vic) - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 21:12

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 21:12
Darwin, of all other Aussie capitals evokes a greater sense of a military past thats more urgent and closer than elsewhere, those airstrips along the side of the road, what a reminder, and we actually drove into one about 8 km off the highway when we were up there, McDonald Rd or McDonald airstrip, something like that. The feeling was still there coming across the abandoned airstrip, of what it was like and what it was there for 70 odd years ago.

My young fella is at Duntroon at the moment camping out, as part of the officer training program there, he;'s a proud soldier and I too am even prouder of his and the AIF in general given this chance to be closer to things that previously.

Lest we forget indeed, for noone wins a war, you just have different levels of loss.
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Reply By: Fred G NSW - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:44

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:44
G'day Cruiser.
If you get the chance touch base with Doug T down at Mt. Bundy Station at Adelaide River. His research on the numerous former WW2 bases and airstrips up there have provided us all on here with lots of history, and would be worth a visit, and I reckon he'd be only too pleased to point you in the right direction. Not only for the history of the area, but also the wonderful countryside.

Fred.
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Follow Up By: Cruiser .- Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:57

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:57
Fred G,

We spent time with Doug at Mt Bundy on the way up and he gave us a "mini" tour of the WW2 remains at Mt Bundy.

The research he has done is amazing to say the least. Its mind boggling just what was going on up here then and to think that at the time the average Australian had no idea at all, but the sad thing is that the average Australian STILL doesnt know what went on up here.

This stuff needs to be taught in school and not forgotten.
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Follow Up By: Fred G NSW - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 10:16

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 10:16
Couldn't agree more mate. I grew up in the Territory and went to boarding school in Darwin '62 - '64 before going to sea with the grey funnel line lol. Then being less than 20 years since the end of WW2 there was so much evidence of those times, and the Top End's involvement. I have lasting memories of the enormity of the aftermath, and visible reminders.

Enjoy your time in the Top End.

Fred.
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Reply By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 10:31

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 10:31
I don't want to put a sour note into this thread but it is pretty much an uphill battle keeping thiese memories alive in the latter generations.

Watching that multi dollar Hot Seat show last week there was a question about the emu feather in the slouch hat. The question asked which part of the Defence forces wore the emu feather in their hat. There were four answers, one Navy, one Air force and two Army. One was something Armoured corps and the correct one was "the Light Horse. The first person did not even appear to know there was an emu feather in a hat. She passed and the next bloke was a "seemingly" well educated law student in his mid twentys. He didn't even blink an eye when he said he did not know. No shame or regret at all. Same with his wife. Absolutely no interest shown in what the host said about the history of the emu feather. Incredulous.

What hope have we.

Still we have ANZAC day ro remember and thank them all. Those that came home and those who did not.
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:52

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:52
Our grand children are being taught about the spirit of Anzac and it's history, in school, so I have some hope that the future generations will carry on with the traditions of ANZAC. LEST WE FORGET.
Broodie H3
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Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 12:10

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 12:10
Thanks for that Broodie. I believe that they are also being taught about the Australian Explorers.

I did not know about the ANZAC stuff though.
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 12:35

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 12:35
They are only being taught about some of the explorers, likeEyre Bourke and wills etc... but I haven't seen anything on the history of the rfds or any of our flying greats maybe that will come at a later date in their education, Here's hoping.
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Reply By: ExplorOz - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:40

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:40
Thanks Austin glad you like it - I was really happy how it all turned out too. Your note is appreciated.
Michelle
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Follow Up By: Cruiser .- Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:01

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:01
Michelle,

I have always said "credit where credit is due"

Cheers,

Austin
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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 16:26

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 16:26
Austin,

We were told yesterday morning of the loss of yet another fine Australian Soldier in the Afghanistan conflict.

I just found this posted on another site.


THE HOMECOMING
BY Derrick lees
The young widow stands head held high
As the flag draped coffin
slowly drives by
The hearse comes to a stop
The crowd seem to sigh
As the widow moves forward
And starts to cry
She looks at the coffin borne
By his mates
Then at the grave black and open like hells gates

Standing up straight she
Shakes herself down
A smile lights up her face
Replacing the frown
She shakes her head as she
Looks down at their son
He'll never know his father he isnt quite one
Then her hand plants a kiss
On a cold plate of brass
One final kiss from his loving lass
Though supported by grieving relatives hands
All alone in the crowd she seems to stand
She flinches and seems
Taken aback
At the noise of the rifles
As in salute they crack

As the mournful last post echoes around
Tears roll down her cheeks and fall to the ground
Standing alone in a silent crowd
Thinking the words she cant say aloud
She grieves for a lover,a partner, a mate
Mind full of words unspoken
As its now too late
She stands her body
Starting to shake
Wondering how much more
She can take
How long before the pain &
Heartache are past
Her hero is home now
Home now at last
And tho he wasnt the first
To give up his life
She prays he'll be the last to come home
This way to his wife

( just a few lines on how the families must feel)

Lest We Forget

Kev


Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 17:01

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 17:01
Kev, if you havent read it, get a copy of Over teh Top, by HG Hartnett and have a read. Its a memory changing read I reckon.

All the best mate, I know its like losing a close mate when we lose a Soldier.

Capital letter intended.

Regards

GWBonz
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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 19:50

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 19:50
RIP SGT Diddams


Another Aussie death :(


Lest We Forget






Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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Follow Up By: Cruiser .- Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 20:00

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 20:00
Another sad lose to our nation

LEST WE FORGET
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Reply By: Member - Terry. G (TAS) - Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 00:19

Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 00:19
My condolences to the family
from another ex service man
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Reply By: Sir Kev & Darkie - Tuesday, Jul 10, 2012 at 07:38

Tuesday, Jul 10, 2012 at 07:38
“Do not call me hero,
When you see the medals that I wear,
Medals maketh not the hero,
They just prove that I was there.

... ... Do not call me hero,
Now that I am old and grey,
I left a lad, returned a man,
They stole my youth that day.

Do not call me hero,
When we ran the wall of hail,
The blood, the fears, the cries, the tears
We left them where they fell.

Do not call me hero,
Each night I stop and pray,
For all the friends I knew and lost,
I survived my longest day.

Do not call me hero,
In the years that pass,
For all the real true heroes,
Have crosses, lined up on the grass.”

Author Unknown.


Russell Coight:
He was presented with a difficult decision: push on into the stretching deserts, or return home to his wife.

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