Second fuel tank

Submitted: Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 16:23
ThreadID: 96657 Views:8026 Replies:9 FollowUps:13
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Hi All,
I want a greater fuel capacity in my Ute, but don’t want to spend $1,800 getting one made and fitted.
I have been given an oblong tank which is sound and will fit under the tray ok.
I have looked at the Boab style tray top tanks which seem to use gravity feed into the main tank via a manual valve.
Looks easy, how hard can it be?
Has anyone done this? Am I just naïve?
Anyone with posative stories?

Rgds
Ian
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Reply By: wombat100 - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 16:52

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 16:52
Yes- we have the Boab 60 litre undertray stainless stell tank on our unit.
Works well..no probs.
The standard tank is a meazly 78 litres.
I think the distributor is over your side of the island...



AnswerID: 490050

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 17:03

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 17:03
Tks Wom,

I will check them out only seen the above tray ones.
I have the same trouble, 80 lt, gives me around 550k on a good day, need more for the Connie Sue.

Rgds
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FollowupID: 765233

Reply By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 17:25

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 17:25
HI Ian

Diesel or petrol? I would not be keen on a tray mounted petrol tank. With one huge diesel tank on the F250, my concern was more about not having any fuel if we got a hole in the tank somewhere remote. With no room under the tray, we opted for a tray mounted tank (55 litres size), and had it plumbed in by a mechanic so we had to option of either draining it into the main tank (if needing extra distance) or using it direct from the auxiliary tank if we had holed the main tank. It has been removed now we are home for full use of the ute tray, but the fittings remain so it can be put back for remote travel.

Motherhen
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AnswerID: 490054

Follow Up By: sue and shaun - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:02

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:02
G day motherhen this might be a silly question whats stopping me from just having 60 litre drum of diesel in the back of ute and syphon it when needed i have been looking at all these different long range fuel tanks would,nt this be cheap and simple , i respect your thoughts cheers go the F trucks
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FollowupID: 765246

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:10

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:10
Hi Sue and Shaun

Many people in the country do it that way. So long as you could secure the drum so it didn't move in an impact accident or rolllover, it is a simple solution. Our tank was strapped in place. It was not an option for us, and our object was not added distance but a back up for use direct.

Mh
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Follow Up By: sue and shaun - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:44

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:44
thanks motherhen i think we may have decided on van now its getting ute sorted what to pack and how to pack it . i dare say i may be seeking more advice along the way cheers
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FollowupID: 765252

Reply By: Ross M - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 17:43

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 17:43
Just use the tank you have for in the tray if you have room.
Because most tanks like that have a drop pipe for the extraction feed, when you want to drain fuel, use a hose from the outlet and for a short time, pressurize the tank and the flow down the hose will then syphon the rest into the OE tank.

Easy as.

I would always run the fuel through a filter on the way into the truck though.
AnswerID: 490056

Reply By: wizzer73 - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 18:25

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 18:25
Just on a side note, if you do fit a second tank and plumb it in, aren't you supposed to take your car over the pits for inspection? If you get one fitted by ARB or ORE I'm pretty sure you need to get it inspected.
Sometimes its not worth the hassle and just easier to use jerrycans.

wizzer
AnswerID: 490060

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:07

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 19:07
I never gave that aspect a thought wizzer, but our mechanic is pretty cluey and i don't think would have put himself at risk if that was the case.

Mh
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 21:09

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 21:09
my Longrange tank i got through ARB was mod plated when they installed it. i doubt they take it "over the pits" as such, my guess is they have someone licenced at ARB who does the mod. plate in shop, or maybe someone close by who does it for them.
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Follow Up By: wizzer73 - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 13:31

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 13:31
If you have a look at this link for the wa dept of transport link
it suggests a modification to the fuel system requires approval. It would be worth firing an email of to them to see if an extra tank does require inspection or not. Your insurance may be void without it.
While this is a little different, I had to get my LPG system inspected and they checked things like how the tank was mounted, how close to the exhaust it was etc.

wizzer
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FollowupID: 765320

Reply By: racinrob - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 18:36

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 18:36
G'day Ian.
I have a tray back 'Cruiser with a slide on, under the tray space was already taken with a 65 litre water tank so I carry two steel jerry cans either side in custom made (by me) carriers , 80 litres all up, got us over the Simpson.

rr VKE237 6678
AnswerID: 490061

Reply By: Member - iijmartin - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 20:23

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 20:23
Gday Noldi,
If you have enough room in the back of the ute, I have been considering a portable diesel tank with its own 12v pump and hose/nozzle. When I need it throw it in the back, otherwise can use it on my hobby farm. Several brands , the cheapest 100L around $700 in local ag supplier catalogues. A lot cheaper than the Long Ranger, a lot dearer than jerries.
AnswerID: 490080

Reply By: Wayne's 60 - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 20:59

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 20:59
Greetings folks,

We gave thought to fitting a long range tank under the tail of the cruiser ........ then we have to get a wheel carrier to carry the spare ......... and unlock/open it every time we want to get into the back of the vehicle.

While not really an answer to your question Noldi, we bought 5 x 20 litre jerry cans and we use as many or a few as we want.

Did I mention that we are some three thousand dollars (to buy diesel) in front??

Cheers,
Wayne & Sally.

P.S. Look forward to seeing you out and about.
W&S.
AnswerID: 490084

Follow Up By: GT Campers - Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 22:35

Tuesday, Jul 03, 2012 at 22:35
One spare is OK on the turret of a Crusier...assuming you don't have anything else up there! That means no swingaway jobbies in the way of your tailgate and with a Long Ranger tank, your fuel is outside the cabin and the weight is low on the vehicle...moot point with a spare up top!
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FollowupID: 765277

Follow Up By: Wayne's 60 - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 01:50

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 01:50
Hi GT,

You also have to purchase the roof rack ............ more $$

Cheers,
Wayne & Sally.
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FollowupID: 765280

Follow Up By: GT Campers - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:20

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:20
a roof rack is a lot more affordable than a swing-away style wheel carrier. It also has less mass, doesn't restrict towing (a tyre carrier should be considered as tow ball download with regard to its chassis installation) and is far easier to remove when you don't need it
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FollowupID: 765293

Reply By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:28

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 09:28
Thanks everyone, lots if great ideas.
I wish the canopy was 500mm shorter but when your on a budget I guess you have to compromise. When we had the camper I would carry 4 Jerries hence no need for a long range tank.

I think you have made some good points though, I will spend the time mounting (or slinging) the tank as close to the centre of the vehicle as I can, then pop down to see the local mechanic ans see if he will plumb it in. I have read gravity feed is slow but think I can manage it over various stops during the day.

Rgds
AnswerID: 490096

Reply By: Member - silvwayne - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:17

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:17
Hi Ian!

I purchased a 90 lire poly tank mae by Enmach Industries. www.enmachind.com.au/poly-rv-accessories/diesel-tanks.

Mounted it on tray of my Ranger ute and gravity fed it into the filler hose. I used a electric fuel solenoid. It is switched on by a switch in the cab, connected to the accesories wiring, so it is not accidentally left on. Doing all the work myself cost less than $250. Gives me approx 150 litres of fuel.

Regards wayne
AnswerID: 490102

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:46

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:46
Thanks Wayne,
Sounds very similar to what I want to achieve, are the electric solenoids readily available?
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FollowupID: 765309

Follow Up By: Member - silvwayne - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 12:20

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 12:20
Sent you a PM

Wayne
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FollowupID: 765316

Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:19

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:19
Hi Wayne, nothing seen on the PM front, email is
Charabang1@gmail.com
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FollowupID: 765321

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