Vehicle pilots

Submitted: Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 10:55
ThreadID: 96666 Views:4973 Replies:16 FollowUps:22
This Thread has been Archived
Just done a trip 6 weeks Geraldton Broome and back, as there's lots happening in the Pilbara there were plenty of wide loads only once was I called by the pilot advising of a wide load .
My question is why don't they call R/vs as many of us do sit on channel 40 .I appreciate it,s a pain if they get no reply from those who don't use 40 but surely it,s a safety factor as we with our vans need more time to manoeuvre off the road.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:32

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:32
I do not understand why they would need to call.

Surely the signs, flashing lights and as needed hand signals would be enough.

And they usually sit far enough out in front enough for trucks coming the other way to take safe evasive action. I am sure that your RV and any caravan is much more manageable than a truck. Especially a road train.
AnswerID: 490105

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:40

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 11:40
I just remembered another thread that was mentioning calling trucks on the radio.

If they were to call who is to say that they are 100% confident that it was you that they contacted. It may have been another RV idling along behind them who is not aware of the "convoy" ahead. He takes "evasive" action for no reason.

No doubt that there are other scenarios thay can come up but that was my first instinct.

They also may want to stick to their "convoy" (could even be VHF) channel and not lose contact with each other.
0
FollowupID: 765308

Reply By: olcoolone - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 13:20

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 13:20
The problem with calling is what are they going to use as a landmark........ "wide load heading east 3 kilometres from tower".... what tower are they talking about and on what road!

As for a van requiring more time to manoeuvre of the road....... how much time do you need?

If I have a vehicle coming towards me with flashing lights and a sign saying wide load I know there is something big coming..... most times we will pick the flashing lights up way before we see the pilot vehicle.

AnswerID: 490110

Follow Up By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:55

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:55
G'day everyone

Yes it can be a pain at times with oversize and mega size loads, there are times when the pilot vehicle driver is broadcasting almost continuously simply because the on coming traffic is mainly semi trailers and road trains, so I can only guess the caravanner does not require personal notification of an on coming oversize load. Assuming everyone on the highway with a vehicle bristeling with antenna is smart enough to be on scan.
Image Could Not Be Found
Some road train drivers are even too tired to reply to the pilot and you can imagine what language is used to try and varify his parentage !!!
Image Could Not Be Found
The most sensible thing to do is move over or pull off the tar seal, being mindful that here in the west, the highways have deep drains and culverts almost up to the actual edge of the dirt shoulder.
Image Could Not Be Found
0
FollowupID: 765326

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 22:50

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 22:50
I wonder if the cop booked the road train for dangerous driving or did the road train get around the wide load safely without going anywhere near the drain. Even in the photo it looks as if the road trains front is already ahead.

I suggest that it was all managed quite nicely on the radio. They aren't that stupid.

If he didn't get around then where are the photos of the accident.

Sorry but I do not appreciate people over dramatising things. That is what it looks like to me. Whoever took the photo and posted the caption looks to be scaremongering.
0
FollowupID: 765381

Follow Up By: olcoolone - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 09:13

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 09:13
I'm sure the wide load guys knew the road train was there and gave him to OK to pass........ looks like the wide load driver had pulled off the road to get him past...... maybe some hilly terrain or no where to overtake coming up..... I don't think the wide load driver would of run off the road that far travelling at speed.

0
FollowupID: 765404

Follow Up By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:42

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:42
G'day PJR and olcoolone

There was a lot of talking going on over the cb before and after the planned manoeuvre and yes the roadtrain managed to pull in fornt of the oversize load.

I guess it can be considered as a safe move by the truckers at the time simply because they made the move successfully.

PJR ~ there was no accident and my post and images were not meant to scaremonger or over dramatise what actually happened, but purely to highlight to whoever cared to read and view the posts, that there are some massive truck carried loads on the highways the we all travel and the everyone should heed the airway traffic (cb radio talk ) when they are on the open road(s).

I am the owner/taker of the images ( photographs ) ~ I was there as all this was happening and no the tripple trailered road train did not drive into the culvert/drain ahead of my vehicle, the point I was trying to highlight regarding these drains is they are mostly hidden by high grass and if you do not come to a stop you could easily roll or drive into these death traps.
Image Could Not Be Found
Image Could Not Be Found
So when you are ordered off the road by the Pilot or the Police because there is an on coming oversize load ~ pull over where it is safe and STOP.

Wait for all the debris that comes flying at your vehicle and when its safe to get back on track continue your journey.

Safe travels
0
FollowupID: 765411

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 12:11

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 12:11
Hi Joe

I didn't think that it was as bad as what some say. Actually you see it often with the amount of traffic around these days.

Both of us are what one would call defensive drivers. There is ALWAYS something around the corner that you should be ready for. Thus hearing them coming on the radio makes no difference to us. We are already. Dad taught me to "always look for a way out". That doesn't mean you drive along with your eyes looking for escape routes. It just means be aware that you may need one some day. Haven't as yet but I am not be complacent.

And yes. Look out for the "drain covered by grass" as well. As you highlighted.

I just do not like all the swearing and will not have the radio on ch40 continuosly for just that reason. Sure it goes there when there is a need. But not 100% of the time. Especially with the kids in the car. They learn how to swear quickly enough without us saying it is okay by having the radio on ch 40.

And I know about the debris. Safest is to stop. Hey! Whats the rush anyway.

Bye the way; Good photos. Always look at the truck photos at truck stops while waiting for a cuppa etc.
0
FollowupID: 765422

Follow Up By: Member - Dirt Princess - Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 01:56

Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 01:56
Thanks for the valuable info people. I for one didn't know about the culverts as those above. I have never been up Norwest except when I was a kid. So thank you again.
0
FollowupID: 765473

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 14:13

Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 14:13
We were moving over a bit one night to let a road train past and ended going down the roadside embankment. At the bottom was a large rectangular concrete hole without the grate. If we hadn't had the control arm reinforced we would have lost the front end. I will never forget it and thank my mechanic heaps. All four wheels off the ground. Damned lucky.

Watch them, especially at night.
0
FollowupID: 765498

Reply By: Member - Michael P (QLD) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:11

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:11
The pilot vehicle normally advise oncoming trucks of the overall width of the wideload.
There is no way that a caravanner is going to get that or any other courtesy from a truckie. (IMHO).
Mike.
AnswerID: 490112

Follow Up By: Stu & "Bob" - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 17:18

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 17:18
I have no problems getting courtesy from truck operators.
I always call up the pilot car escort and confirm the width of the load.
Similarly, when approached by a truck from the rear, I inform them that I know they are there, and to give me a call when they wish to go around, and I will slow down a bit for them.
This is always received with appreciation, and in some cases, surprise is detectable in the voice of the operator.

My .02
0
FollowupID: 765334

Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:42

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:42
Pilots of wide loads need to assume that many approaching vehicles do not have UHF reception. Therefore they travel with flashing lights and sufficiently ahead of the load to provide the adequate safety provisions. Accordingly it is unnecessary and a waste of time to be making general broadcasts of their presence.

As an exception, they may communicate with large trucks by radio to provide helpful detail of the approaching wide load.

Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 490113

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:55

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:55
Exactly Allan.

I gather that some people with RV's think that they need special attention.

Surely anyone with any nouse at all will slow down when they pass the pilot and find out soon enough how far they need to get over.

As far as one coming from behind is concerned just do as the pilot says or indicates. No need for a radio.

0
FollowupID: 765347

Reply By: Member - Redbakk (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:49

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 14:49
Hello new boy, we always use channel 40 as you get all soughts of alerts including wide loads and so we have plenty of time to pick a good place to pull over and park.
The truckies also alert you to other things as well like police road blocks, radar, road accidents, blockages, etc,etc, so I find all this extremely useful.
You can always use your channel scan feature if you have one but as for me I rather listen to the trucky channel than to rv traveller channel banging on about this and that.

JMHO

.
AnswerID: 490114

Reply By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:14

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:14
Sit on channel 40 and you will here the calls to approaching trucks giving width of load or number of units. The calls can generally be heard for quite some kilometres. You will soon find out about extra wide loads well before you reach them. You can always initiate questions if you have any.

When escorting farm machinery, i always alert approaching trucks about what i have (eg two field bins and a boom spray following). With a convoy such as this, we keep a distance between each unit so vehicles can pass, although as soon as the rear guard picks up someone behind, she alerts the pilot who pulls the whole convoy over as soon as there is a safe place for all. It is generally a waste of time alerting cars as not many use UHF. Sometimes it means driving straight at them until they yield - you get on every time who thinks the warnings are not for him ~. I have only once encountered caravanners, and both pulled over and stopped completely without any two way contact being made. A very friendly wave and a smile as i passed to thanks them :) I travel a good distance ahead of the oversize load so there is plenty of time for even a road train to pull up if need be, so plenty of time for a caravan.

With commercial outfits such as you will meet in the Pilbara they do not allow you to pass nearly as often as we do so it may be a slow trip behind, although they will be aware of you there.

Motherhen
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 490117

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:18

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:18
While i was typing, Joe has above posted first hand from the Pilbara, complete with photos.

Mh
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765328

Reply By: Gone Bush (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:50

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 15:50
I asked a road pilot once why they don't broadcast to caravans and he said that they never get an answer.

Lame excuse in my book.

The majority of caravans would have UHF these days.

I always ask for the width if it is not offered. Eventually the message might get through that we are all road users.

I'm glad I ain't too scared to be lazy
- Augustus McCrae (Lonesome Dove)

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 490118

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:26

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:26
Hi Stephen

Maybe the majority have them - but do they listen? I can relate to what was said to you. I virtually gave up calling other caravanners when travelling as getting a response was so rare. A few of those towing a certain brand of van were the exception ;)

Mh

Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765341

Reply By: The Landy - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 16:36

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 16:36
There is no law requiring all-road users to carry a UHF radio, so whilst helpful to make a broadcast call it will only ever be heard by those who have UHF, and assuming it is switched on to the channel being broadcast on.

There is only one sure-fire way to avoid any hazard on the road and that is to look out the windscreen, first and foremost, radio calls may assist, but then again they may confuse...


AnswerID: 490120

Reply By: Bush Wanderer - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:16

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:16
Saw a caravanner end up in a ditch when one of the renter cop (nissan patrol) pilot vehicles came around a corner on the wrong side too quick.
I have mates that are pilot drivers, and they said these pilots sometimes have no idea.
Best for everyone to leave their UHF on channel 40 on our road train routes heading north of Perth.....these roads are horrendously busy with big loads.
BW.
AnswerID: 490124

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:28

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 18:28
Sound advice BW :)

"Best for everyone to leave their UHF on channel 40 on our road train routes heading north of Perth.....these roads are horrendously busy with big loads."

Mh
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765342

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:12

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:12
Hi Bushie and MH

We do not appreciate the almost continuous "F" this and "F" that on CH40, so unless we are in remote area we do not leave the radio on channel 40. A bitumen road is not what I would call remote. Yes there are situations, such as logging areas and around accidents and floods etc where it would be helpful to be on. But not as a general rule if I can help it. Besides we like to chat or listen to quiet music without rude, foul mouthed, interruptions.

I cannot see the trouble with wide loads and even rogue egotistical pilots (rented ones). Not in almost 50 years of driving and lots of towing as well did we ever have a problem. You see a pilot and slow down and move over ready for when you see the wide load. Even looking for places to pull right off as required. Then when you near the wide load you either move over further or stop well out of the way. I cannot see the need for the radio. Leave them alone with their convoy comms. They may be busy with a problem and need an open channel.
0
FollowupID: 765408

Follow Up By: Bush Wanderer - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:21

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:21
My example was pretty clear PJR. There ditching could have been avoided if they were monitoring Channel 40.

Each to there own.....knowing what's around the next corner is smart for those they value their lives on these incredibly busy roads. Roads have not been as busy as they are now in the last 50 years.

BW.
0
FollowupID: 765410

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:43

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 10:43
Did you hear the wayward pilot broadcast that he was approaching the corner on the wrong side? Maybe even say that he was coming! I would say the answer would be no. Otherwise you would have told us that you heard it on your radio that is always on channel 40. A radio on channel 40 would not have helped.

As others have said it's no use broadcasting that you are coming as there are too many ambiguities. You may even be on a different road or what tree/bridge etc did they say???? etc etc Too confusing.
0
FollowupID: 765412

Follow Up By: Bush Wanderer - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 11:16

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 11:16
I knew that they were approaching....I always have radio on Channel 40.. I also had a go at the lead escort by radio and when he called for the convoy to pullover. He was apologetic and I was the one that towed the car and caravan out while he blocked the traffic.
Accidents happen.
Stick to channel 40 and if you dont see the, you will hear them....FACT!
BW.
0
FollowupID: 765417

Follow Up By: PJR (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 11:58

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 11:58
No good. This stupid pilot is not different from any other idiot who goes on the wrong side. Knowing traffic is in the area is too late. Defensive driving is believing that there is ALWAYS traffic coming. Why is it so different your way. The heavy traffic is not different from anywhere alse in the world. And not everyone has a UHF radio in their car. We never had a problem possibly because we are defensive drivers and always on the lookout for fools.

Would you say that nothing heard = no trucks and overtake. Only if you are mad you would.

Nothing to do with radios. It is what all emergency organisations promote - Defensive driving.
0
FollowupID: 765420

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 12:00

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 12:00
Hi PJR

We find most of the language out on the highways normal and acceptable, and i am known to be prudish, but not so much that i am going to get up in arms because i might hear the F word once or twice. Some of the dialogue between passing truckies who know each other can be very amusing, and I think may well be so knowing they have an audience. Only when we get near cities or large towns and the airways get clogged does the colloquial F word predominate, in which case he volume goes right down. Air waves are overloaded and there is lots of static, but at low volume, if someone right behind called us we would hear.

Mh
Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765421

Reply By: Member - John L (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 20:11

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 20:11
Just arrived Perth from Geraldton - 5 over size going North & as we have channel 40 on their constant communication with truckies enabled us to know exactly what was on the road.
Truckies also let us know when safe to overtake.
We always say a thank you & often get a quick comment from truckie on whats happening - even good spots to camp.
Perhaps we all need to learn the escort lingo - "secure the bridge' 'closing the back door' 'southbound 3.5 stay on the black' " over the fog line'
Perhaps an escort could do a translation for us all?
Cheers Heather
AnswerID: 490137

Follow Up By: Member - WillyWish (WA) - Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 20:25

Wednesday, Jul 04, 2012 at 20:25
I travel reqularly on the Great Northern Hwy and North West Coastal Hwy in WA. I sit on Channel 40 and when a escort approaches simply jump on and ask 'how wide cob/mate/bud'. Always get an answer and I know that generally +4m I'll have to 'drop a wheel' at the least.

Easy as boys! and yes truckies do usually chat to wobblies too...

P.S My main issue with some escorts is they do not travel far enough in advance of the oversize that they are escorting. Grrr.
0
FollowupID: 765362

Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 12:14

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 12:14
Hi Heather an John

Perhaps more jargon is creeping into the air waves. I hate hearing "quotes from American movies" but that is more from people who think that is the lingo than the truckies themselves who usually speak normal English.

Hi WW

"P.S My main issue with some escorts is they do not travel far enough in advance of the oversize that they are escorting. Grrr."

We do see this as we understand the importance of a sufficient gap to enable a fully loaded road train to pull up. It is more difficult when starting out or covering a turn off or onto a road. I also like to know i am maintaining the correct distance when i can't see the load following me because of dips and hills. Keeping it all running safely is a fairly stressful job as i am not a professional pilot but just an occasional escort of family farm machinery, as we are entitled to do without being a licensed escort.

Mh



Motherhen

Red desert dreaming

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 765423

Reply By: Rockape - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 13:29

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 13:29
Tis simple,

Police escort. Get right off the road and stop.

Pilot escort. Ask the pilot how wide he is. He may come back with something like long and skinny, 4.5m or 4.5 metres at the wheels. Which translates to an extended trailer under escort, 4.5m is the width of the load or 4.5m at the wheels is the width of the trailer.
Please just call the pilot and keep it short. He also may ask you to just run your wheels along the fog line or if the load is coming through a narrow section to for you to pull up altogether.

I passed a wide load the other day and the escort thanked me for asking and the truck driver thanked me for pulling over as the road was narrow.

Had dinner with a float driver last night before the sporting event that had Ricky Stewart crying in his beer again. We had a good old laugh about what some Carravaners do and some of the high speeds they travel at on not such good roads.



AnswerID: 490182

Reply By: new boy - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:02

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 17:02
Wow I didn,t expect such robust discussion thanks all.My question has been answered by a couple of people ,lack of response by us R/Vs seems to be the main reason we don't get a call.I listen to 40 on long trips with or without the van and find the information excellent ,the "F" word is dropped occasional and 90% of the time directed at some vanner doing all manner of silly things .Without exception I have found all truckies to be polite and thankful you have called them up just advising them you are aware of there presents.
I still believe a courtesy call from a pilot wouldn,t hurt especially when there have been no truck in the vicinity for some time.
AnswerID: 490189

Reply By: disco driver - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 19:11

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 19:11
Just a comment about communication between drivers.
Back in the early 90's there was a funny incident involving an O/size and an O/Length vehicles in Northampton WA.
There was a wide multi wheeler prime-mover and trailers coming south with a loco aboard and at the same time a long prime-mover and trailers carrying rail line going north.
Total lack of communication between pilots and drivers resulted in both units meeting at the worst possible place in the middle of town, (those of you who know Northampton know where I mean).There is a bend in the highway right in the middle of town and thats where they met.
Result: No accident but lots of red faces, shouting and swearing while they worked out which unit would be easiest to back up.
The locals had a good laugh and after a couple of hours the road was cleared and both units continued their respective journeys.


Disco.
AnswerID: 490190

Reply By: Member - blackbird1937 - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 22:31

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 22:31
We all make mistakes . I was piloting and driving floats with wide loads before radios were put into trucks . You had to be careful as there was always someone who thought that they were better drivers than Jack Brabham . Chopped in and left you with no space in front or came in the inside while you were making a turn . It is even worse now . I thought that I could swear when things go wrong but I heard language on a train in Melbourne a few months ago from some 15 to 16 year old girls just as bad as I have ever heard anyone ever use so it is not just truckies . Some years ago I heard a mature woman go on with very bad language for about 3/4 of an hour on a cb.
AnswerID: 490207

Follow Up By: Member - Joe F (WA) - Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 17:26

Friday, Jul 06, 2012 at 17:26
G'day blackbird 1937

Young people and foul language these days simply go together it seems, sadly you only need to see and hear their parents, no shame ~ little wonder society and some fundamental values have all but changed for the worse in my 60 something years.

I'm not for one second saying my generation was any different but I notice the crappy side of humanity more ~ these days ? simply because its in your face.

All said and done, the high quality of leadership in state and federal governments and some religious organizations have much to shoulder in the slippage of morals and plain common decency.

Bah humbug !!!!

No wonder we seem to head for the sparser populated parts of Australia.

Safe travels :
0
FollowupID: 765512

Reply By: SDG - Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 22:56

Thursday, Jul 05, 2012 at 22:56
I was a pilot driver for a few years.
My job as a pilot was to let the wide vehicle know what was approaching him, wether it be car, bike, truck, dead animal on the road etc. This was to allow the driver to take whatever action was needed. As a courtosy, we informed any heavy vehicle what the size was. By telling the wide load that a caravan is approaching, we are essentially telling them as well, if they are on channel.

The rear escorts job is to tell the wide load what is coming up from behind, and wether the load is still where it should be. We also help other vehicles to over take as required.

Police escort vehicles are not suppose to abandon what they are doing. They are technically off duty, and hired by the hour by the owner of the wideload business. This can be a second job for them. This also applies to those who ecsort parades down the main street of a town. One man police stations may be different.
AnswerID: 490211

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 00:21

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 00:21
I've owned a 100 tonne Drake low loader for several years, piloted thousands of wide loads and hauled oversize earthmoving equipment for over 30 yrs. It's a waste of time trying to contact anyone coming towards you, as you often have little time to make contact.

I was running a 3.6M load West of Kimba and came around a bend to find a wide load that was 5M wide coming towards me, only 250M away, and the pilot only 50 metres in front of the truck. It was fortunate we had plenty of road width at that point.

Many truckies are in too much of a hurry, and won't wait for wide loads even. I was piloting my 100 tonner float from Brisbane to Kalgoorlie at 4.2M wide when we came to a bridge on the Barrier Hwy, well west of Broken Hill - and an East-Wester was barrelling towards us.
I asked him to back off, and he refused. He passed my float right on the bridge and forced my driver into the bridge kerbing, damaging two rims on the dolly in the process. Too many truckies are just plain dangerous operators with a "pedal to the metal" mentality.

As far as wide loads go, get used to them, in the North of W.A. There's over 200 wide load permits being issued a month, by the MRD of W.A. - and that's double what it has been, and it's going to increase by even more again.

The Chevron Wheatstone gas project at Onslow alone, is going to have 700 road train movements from Perth a week, over the next 18 mths. That's above the other, already-increased road train traffic. Wheatstone is one of Australias largest current projects, at about $50B from memory.

Here's a couple we ran into South of Karratha on 3rd July, they were heading South and we were travelling North.
Both the pilot and the Police escort forced us right off the road, because these loads were around 7.5M or 8M wide.
These platform floats contained 184 wheels each, and each wheel is loaded up to 2 or 2.5 tonnes, so these two wide loads travelling in convoy would have been grossing around 400 tonnes each.



AnswerID: 490979

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)