Gas Bottles

Submitted: Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 16:59
ThreadID: 96888 Views:2853 Replies:7 FollowUps:13
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Hi folks wondering if any one can help, i have been told that there are two types of gas bottles barbecue type, caravan type is this true and if so why?
how do u identify the differents
Thanks for ur time BJ
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Reply By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:11

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:11
AFAIK no difference. Both have the same connection and use the same gas. For instance you can use a "swap & go" bottle on either.
AnswerID: 491022

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 21:26

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 21:26
"Both have the same connection" - not entirely true. Permanently connected bottles require nowadays a non corrosive regulator and safety sytem.

Internittent connections - say external to hot plate or cooker can use a direct feed as long as they're disconnected after use.
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 01:19

Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 01:19
Scott, I think you may be confusing the larger gas bottles fitted with the POL connectors and the smaller threaded bottles used with high pressure gas appliances (eg the Companion and Primas bottles.)

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Follow Up By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 06:34

Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 06:34
Scott, I was referring to the connection fitting on the bottle, as Peter said they are standard POL fittings.
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Reply By: racinrob - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:13

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:13
There are 4 grades of LPG bottles, Grade 1 is from memory Galvanized and is for marine applications , Grade 2 is suitable for carrying on the A frame of your caravan, Grades 3 and 4 are a lighter grade and are for patio use.
If you check the collar of a bottle you will find a number inside circle, this is the one you look for when you are swapping your bottle at a "Swap and Go", that as well as the date.

rr VKE237 sel 6678
AnswerID: 491024

Follow Up By: Member - Rod N (QLD) - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:26

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:26
Interesting, I didn't know that. I wonder how many people do. My van bottles are in a separate enclosed compartment. What do I have to use?
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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:58

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:58
There are gas bottles now manufactured from stainless steel too that are for marine use. Not cheap but specific for a harsh marine environment.
cheers
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FollowupID: 766432

Follow Up By: The Bantam - Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 16:48

Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 16:48
Rod mate I am realy concerned that so many campers and caravans seem to have "enclosed" compartments for gass bottles.

This frightens the B'jesus out of me.

Stop, do not pass GO, do not collect $200, check this "enclosed" compartment and make sure there is plenty of ventilation (big holes...BIG holes) provided in the top and the bottom of the compartment.

Remember Bantam's "FART TEST"....if you farted in that compartment would the smell disipate as fast as it would in open air...if not it is dangerous.


Remember caravans burn and caravans explode and far more often than is openly reported.

cheers
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Reply By: Rangiephil - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:31

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:31
I would think its more important to look at the retest date and get one with a long validity. If the cylinder gets corroded , just swap it for another one.

After all the differences are all about corrosion resistance, and you do not "have to" use any one of them.
Regards Philip A
AnswerID: 491026

Follow Up By: racinrob - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:49

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:49
Philip. A bit off the thread but "Swap and Go" bottles are a law unto themselves, you will find a lot of their bottles are not retested, just resprayed and refilled, that's why I said in my earlier post to check the date.


rr
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FollowupID: 766430

Follow Up By: Ross M - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 18:56

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 18:56
G'day RR

It seems the "Swap" is done by the supplier of the bottles and the "Go" ing is done by the traveller, any problems for the company avoided.

The whole thing was setup by someone to make money, rort the system, and it appears the judicial use of various options, with repainting to hide the state of the bottles and a variety of sizes helps the company to make the money.
People are finding the system doesn't work in their favour and many times it is nearly cheaper to but a new bottle and have it filled. At least you then know what you have got.

The unprepared users are the ones who are taken for a ride. Same principle as convenience stores.
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Follow Up By: SDG - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 19:43

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 19:43
I buy and refill. Won't use the swap and go. I prefer to know how my equipment has been treated.
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FollowupID: 766444

Follow Up By: racinrob - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 20:56

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 20:56
SDG, that's my preference too but in places like Roma recently I couldn't find anyone to refill my bottle and had to swap a 9kg (8.5 really) bottle which cost me $38.00 !!!!!!

rr
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FollowupID: 766454

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:45

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 17:45
LPG cylinders come in different sizes for a similar capacity too.

If you check the ELGAS site, their 9kg Swap'n'Go cylinders are listed with a diameter range between 309mm-335mm are a height range between 450mm-525mm.

That is a large variation when you are looking for a replacement cyclinder for your camper or caravan where it is retained by a circular clamp for instance.
The height may be less significant although the higher size range may cause problems for BBQs and Heaters.

I do not use Swap'n'Go cylinders and purchase mine from the same retailer which have an option for one's in both 9kg and 4kg with a built-in gauge operated by an internal float. These are consistant in both height and diameter measurements.

Why the variation in size, even from the same manufacturer, I have no idea.

Bill


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AnswerID: 491027

Follow Up By: Member - Wamuranman - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 18:26

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 18:26
Yes Sand man is correct...the sizes do vary.
Unfortunately we just got caught out and had to lose our brand new bottle from our brand new van at a swap and go. When I put the exchange one in I had to tighten the metal strap considerably ...it was a smaller diameter. Then I noticed it said 8.5kg on the bottle. I am sure the new one I surrendered said 9kg.
Travellers beware in some places there is only swap n go...they will not refill your existing bottle. We were about to head further west and didn't want to risk running out of gas. Now I have one nice new bottle on our van and one crappy swap n go smaller bottle.
I am so mad I did that now.
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FollowupID: 766437

Reply By: Lyn W3 - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 18:30

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 18:30
Here's another type of gas bottle which has been available in the USA for several years.

Lite weight gas bottles

AnswerID: 491033

Reply By: Rangiephil - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 20:35

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 20:35
Er I was not advocating Swap and Go. I usually use Ray's Outdoors for refill as I find them cheaper than most and I get a discount.

BUt I must admit I did swap my almost out of date 4Kg for a Swap and Go one with a 08 inspection stamp. LOL. It is much cheaper than buying a new bottle.
Regards Philip A
AnswerID: 491046

Follow Up By: Member - bbuzz (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 17, 2012 at 08:50

Tuesday, Jul 17, 2012 at 08:50
BCF are also cheaper and the same across the country. The same price in Coffs Harbour and on the West Coast.

Bill
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Reply By: Member - Peter R (QLD) - Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 21:18

Sunday, Jul 15, 2012 at 21:18
Check out Gas bottle standards

From above regulations

1 Hot Dip Galvanizing

2 Abrasive blasted + inorganic zinc rich coating + organic zinc rich coating.

3 Sprayed Zinc Coating

4 Red oxide or polyester powder coat.

Stainless steel would probably be the best for caravan usage, but they are likely to be quite expensive. So, when exchanging gas bottles, the number 1 in the circle should be preferred. The number 2 bottles should be the minimal treatment for caravan usage. The number 3 and the powder coated type with number 4 in the circle should be restricted to home use.

Most of the swap bottles I have seen are for home use only so I always get mine filled.

Pedro


AnswerID: 491049

Follow Up By: racinrob - Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 15:06

Monday, Jul 16, 2012 at 15:06
For interest sake I looked up stainless steel LPG bottles at a marine supplier, a 4.5 kilo bottle on special at $499.00 !!!

rr
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