Cruiser Oil

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 21:30
ThreadID: 9928 Views:1249 Replies:7 FollowUps:12
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I've been wondering if anybody has tried the new oil being advertised out of Brisbane....."CRUISER OIL". I phoned the bloke and said he'd probably lose a lot of sales straight away because of the silly name he's chosen, but as he said "Patrol Oil" didn't sound any better!!
Has anybody tried this stuff yet? If so, does the claim of 30% more power and 12% more torque sound right??
I've just received an email from the bloke with a number of attachments which supposedly provide the "proof". It costs around $25- for 5 litres which is about the same as I paid the other day for Shell Helix Diesel at Repco here in Kadina. There are no retailers around here, but he said if I want some he'd get it freighted to me.
Cheers,
Roachie
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Reply By: Glenno - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 21:48

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 21:48
Id love to see how changing your oil can deliver 30% more power. If it was that simple Shell and others would be doing it. I detect a snake oil salesman.

More than happy to be prooven wrong though. Love to see the manufacturer post the independant tests on the web so we can have a look at them

Cheers,

Glenn
AnswerID: 43862

Reply By: Dave from Fraser Coast 4WD Club - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 21:54

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 21:54
Cruiser oil by synforce has been around for a couple of years,

I use it, not because of the claims but because it is made right here in Hervey Bay by a small family (i believe) company, rather than a multinational.
AnswerID: 43863

Follow Up By: Roachie - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 21:58

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 21:58
Dave, I guess it's a silly question then; but are you entirely happy with the stuff? Is the price I quoted the same up there?
Cheers,
Roachie
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Follow Up By: Dave from Fraser Coast 4WD Club - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 22:06

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 22:06
I have no reason to complain, price is slightly cheaper I think, but that is probably to be expected.

I don't think that an oil can make that big a difference, but I'm happy and have a warm fuzzy feeling about helping a local firm.
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Follow Up By: pathfinder - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 08:59

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 08:59
they would be sourcing the oil from a "multinational" - I doubt they have their own oil rig/distillation/fractionation/chemical plant in Hervey Bay...
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Follow Up By: Rick Blaine - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 11:25

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 11:25
Maybe they are "rerefining" used oil....in Hervey Bay you could do almost anything. There is a chap in Canberra that collects used oil and re refines it... i have no idea as to its quality.
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Follow Up By: Dave from Fraser Coast 4WD Club - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 16:40

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 16:40
I'll acknowledge that, but it's still better than a local company getting nothing isn't it.
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Follow Up By: Rick Blaine - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 17:02

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 17:02
hey guys... I have no problem with rerefined oil I'm just annoyed that I cant get a suitable grade in Canberra for my Jack & yes support local busness I was just making an observation.
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Reply By: Mark - Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 22:49

Wednesday, Jan 21, 2004 at 22:49
Different types of oil can definetly alter the power of an engine. Oil is used to lubricate the moving parts in an engine and depending on the "slipperyness" of the oil, depends on how much drag is imposed on the engine. The drag is an appreciable amount, but 30% power improvement sounds very ambitious. Very viscous (thin) oils can improve power, but it "can" be at the expense of lubricating properties.

Also, power is simply "torque x rpm", so to be able to quote a 30% power improvement and only a 12% torque means that the improvement was not linear across the rev range.

Multigrade oils are an example of how an oil can be "altered" to improve performance. A long time ago one put in say a 10W grade oil in winter and changed to a 40W for summer. Now the one oil does the lot.

Typically, a synthetic oil can achieve some of the claims, but the "cruiser" oil is a mineral oil, not synthetic. Also, one must be careful about the levels of detergent and other additives in an oil. These are critical for diesel engines as they run relatively dirty compared to petrol or LPG engines. Nissan GU 3.0TD engines need the CF(4) grade oil, not the latest CG (4), basically due to the amount of detergents in the oil. Even though the 3.0TD is one of the latest diesel engine designs, it does not take the "highest" grade diesel oil.

Basically, while not knocking this oil, one has to be very careful with the type and grade of oil used. Thoroughly check the grade, both the petrol grade (SH, SJ, SL etc...) AND the diesel grade (CD, CE, CF, CG) thats recommended for your vehicle.

I believe a lot of problems with the GU 3.0TD engine is bought about by owners using the higher grade oil thinking they are helping. However, this is not the case and may be responsible for some of the engine failures being seen in this model.

Cheers

Mark
(Chemical Engineer)
AnswerID: 43879

Follow Up By: Member - Mal (Brisbane) - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 12:22

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 12:22
Mark,
What grade of oil should the Toyota 1HD-FTE engine be using?

Mal T.
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Follow Up By: Mark - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 15:21

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 15:21
Mal,

You will need to check your manual. I suspect CF(4) grade, but the cruiser "may" be OK with the higher grade CG(4) as I believe it has a 5,000km service interval as opposed to the GU 3.0TD 10,000km service interval.

Cheers

Mark
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Follow Up By: chapo - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 19:49

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 19:49
I thought very viscous oils would be thick not thin.
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Follow Up By: Mark - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 22:21

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 22:21
Chapo, a quick way to think of viscosity is how many rpm a fixed power impeller would spin in a jar of oil. A thick oil would have the impellor spinning slowly (low viscosity) while a thin oil would have the impellor spinning fast (high viscosity).

Cheers

Mark
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Follow Up By: chapo - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 01:53

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 01:53
Sorry Mark ,but I think you are wrong. Viscosity is the measurement of a liquids resistance to flow.Therefore a high viscosity means a high resistance to flow, so the liquid is thicker than a low viscosity liquid.
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Follow Up By: Mark - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 12:20

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 12:20
Hi Chapo, I sat down and thought about it and yes you are right.

I remember (just!) doing the viscosity experiments in my uni days many moons ago and that a thin fluid had a high rpm count. But, in my haste to type quickly, my grey matter forgot that its the inverse of rpm in the equation to calculate viscosity.

I normally refer to the fluidity of a fluid (reciprocal of viscosity) and a high fluidity fluid is thin. I need to take more care with definitions when swapping terms.

Cheers

Mark
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Reply By: Phil G - Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 11:34

Thursday, Jan 22, 2004 at 11:34
A clever piece of marketing.
AnswerID: 43942

Reply By: Member - Bradley- Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 10:52

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 10:52
30% increase hey, lets see the verified independant dyno results thanks !!

I have seen the results of changing oil grades in race engines a few times , one of which was a nascar engine which as you know are fairly well built donks, the engine was running a 5w50 grade of synthetic, the oil was changed to 0w20 synthetic and the dyno run repeated with the same engine temp / compensation tables the same ,ambient temp the same etc.. The change was 6% at best, with reduced oil temps under load.

They are probably one of the back yard blenders, there are plenty around, it just depends where they are getting their base oil from and who is actually testing the batches etc.

On the other hand it may be snake oil in them bottles :-)Moo... everyone knows what a Jackaroo looks like :-)
AnswerID: 44079

Reply By: Member - Eskimo - Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 11:51

Friday, Jan 23, 2004 at 11:51
emu poo in ya tank will give you about the same inreased as power as that oil i reckon!!
geez some people are gullible?Wow! am I cute
If yer ain't fishing, Yer ain't livin
Richard
AnswerID: 44090

Reply By: G.T. - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 13:17

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 at 13:17
Roachie ---- I am suprised that you have not had a post from `Brian 525 ` of Bi Tron Fuel and Oil Metal Treatment fame. Usually he is quite quick to respond to a post that has a fuel or oil thread. Maybe it`s that there is not a opportunity to make a sale to you as you are looking at another ( maybe? ) superior product .
Or has he stopped advertising on this Forum and confined his advertising to the Trader section as most advertisers do. Regards G.T.
AnswerID: 44463

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