Sharing the road

Submitted: Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 06:57
ThreadID: 99860 Views:3352 Replies:10 FollowUps:28
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This quote is from truck driver Mat Dockerty.

It is worth the read as none of us are perfect. A little reminder doesn't hurt.

I will now go and put my hat on so I am oblivious of all other vehicles around me. Most will know what I am talking about.


The Christmas / New Year period has come and gone as 2013 rolls forward without hesitation. Unfortunately for too many they didn’t see the New Year in, with fifty deaths on the nations roads over the same period.

It’s something very close to my own heart this year after my girlfriend, Joanna, nearly lost her own life after leaving the road, possibly due to a blown steer tyre, and rolling seven times. We’re the lucky ones, a couple of weeks in hospital and a few broken bones is a much nicer option that what could have been.

The statistics for fatal accidents on our roads continue to improve despite an ever increasing amount of traffic and well they should. The technology in modern vehicles continues to improve and make up for the shortcomings of the average driver. Traction control, anti-lock brakes, doplar radar and more whoopy cushions than you can point a gear stick at all help reduce the impact.

Unfortunately you can’t counter stupidity despite the best efforts of the road safety authorities and manufactures.

My observation is that on the whole, drivers are going a lot slower although this is as much the fault of speedo inaccuracy as it is a conscious decision by drivers, most of them looking up incredulously as a B-Double cruises by doing the legal speed but you can see they’re thinking we’re speeding. Slow I can cope with, it’s the ones that speed up when the road widens to two or three lanes that bleep me to tears as they slow down again when the road narrows and you’re still stuck behind them.

Another issue I see is learner drivers on the road over the Christmas break. This is not a good learning environment. Increased traffic with impatient and unskilled drivers hell bent on reaching their destination, drive too aggressively to be stuck behind a learner forced to travel at 80kph. If it’s a double demerit period lets get the learners where it’s safe, in the passenger seat, mum and dad are going to struggle to stay alive without giving junior the reins.

Caravans… I lost count of how many I saw parked up with failed wheel bearings. This I believe is a direct result of having no annual inspection requirements for light trailers combined with owners who have no mechanical aptitude. Wheel bearing inspection on such a vehicle is a piece of cake but their obviously not preparing adequately for their annual migration. At a time in their lives when most drivers have held their licence uncontested for forty or fifty years why shouldn’t another test be in order to tow a van? Some of these things are huge and you can tell at a glance the ones that have their load poorly distributed or are badly setup in the first place.

Lastly, there’s the truck drivers, the vast majority of whom appear to be doing the right thing but I still see the odd one who gets a bit hot under the collar and attempts some reeducation by tailgating. Come on guys, not only are we meant to be the professionals out here, we’re fully aware of the consequences. Do you really want to pull a family worth of corpses out from under your steer axle just because you couldn’t keep your bleep in one sock?

Take it easy out there and we’ll all make it home.
Mat.

Have a safe one,
RA.
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Reply By: Member - MUZBRY(Vic) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 07:56

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 07:56
Good morning RA
I agree whole heartedly ....

Muzbry
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Reply By: Member - Tony (ACT) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 08:02

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 08:02
Well said and written. I'm glad he put the last bit in about other truck drivers. I see more and more trucks on the road wanting to overtake when I'm sitting on the limit or in my case just a few k's above, what are they thinking aye.

I have a lot to do with truck drivers during harvest in the Hillston area and I dont think one of them got booked for speeding this year. In one day we had 80 truck movements off farm. The odd one got pinged for overloading.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ups and Downs - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:06

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:06
Tony,

Maybe you are "sitting on the limit" but then again perhaps not.

In my case the Toyota is in fact doing only around 103 kph (by GPS) when the speedo indicates 110kph.

Again, with the GPS showing me doing 110kph, the speedo shows me 'speeding' at around 118kph.

I used to wonder why I was about the only one being legal, now I know.

Paul
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:38

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:38
Paul, that's just semantics...... 110 or 90 shouldn't matter - we drive to the conditions.

Case in point - trip up to Grafton and back from Taree early December with a group of four 4wd's. Given the variable speed of the vehicles, and the variable speed of the road due to major roadworks all the way up, caution and discretion was called for. The only vehicles that concerned us (and scared the bejesus out of us!!) on the way up and way back was truck drivers .... some of them were downright mad and dangerous. I was run onto the shoulder once, my father twice, Iain once, and saw two other vehicles scared into the wobblies.

"Lastly, there’s the truck drivers, the vast majority of whom appear to be doing the right thing but I still see the odd one who gets a bit hot under the collar and attempts some reeducation by tailgating. Come on guys, not only are we meant to be the professionals out here, we’re fully aware of the consequences. Do you really want to pull a family worth of corpses out from under your steer axle just because you couldn’t keep your bleep in one sock?"

About sums it up......
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Follow Up By: Member - Tony (ACT) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:38

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:38
No mine is about spot on, but i most travel by the GPS, its big and easy to read, sits up on dash so the Co Driver can keep an eye on the speed. But when I can do the 110 I must be still 10k faster than trucks, but no some still want to overtake, not all mind you as the can easy go a lot quicker than I can when I'm towing.
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Reply By: sweetwill - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 08:08

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 08:08
All to true, and its not only the p platers and the learners that drive at 80k an hour in a 100 or 110 klm an hour zone "you know who you are" and I have been told many a time the speed limit is 100 or 110 but I can go as slow as I like and I will, who cares if I stop the free flow of traffic im alright Jack, so all I can say is I will see you all out there again next holidays.Bill.
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Follow Up By: Andrew & Jen - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:21

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:21
Hullo Bill

Depending on the vehicle I am driving, I might be going at the speed limit in the car (100 or 110) or it might well be less in the F250 with the dual axle van behind. Personally, I don't think that is the issue; it is how I choose to behave in the latter situation that matters.

Awareness of who is behind and wanting to overtake, talking with them and reaching agreement as to where and how is what is needed - and in my experience works well in the vast majority of cases.

For example, I might be doing between 90 and 95, agreeing that I will slow up as soon as the truck pulls out to pass, thus decreasing the time to complete the overtaking. A couple of flicks of the lights to indicate safe to pull back in and the resulting use of the L/R/L indicators from the truck and all's well.

Some truckies say that they prefer vans to travel at 85 as there is a sufficient speed difference to enable safe passing. Others prefer what I do as it means that if they can't pass immediately, at least the delay is not as long. I might even speed up until it is safe to pass.

When they thank me (as many do) I always say that they are working while I am on holiday. And that is a crucial difference. I am enjoying the whole journey, including the country I am travelling through, rather than just trying to get to the destination.

Cheers
Andrew
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Follow Up By: Flighty ( WA ) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:55

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:55
Bill.
Struggling to remember the last time I went past a "P" plate driver here in WA, it's normally them flying past me while I'm at 110 K

Cheers
Paul

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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:30

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:30
Andrew,
Whether right or wrong is going to vary depending on the other party but I do exactly what you have written. 99 times out of 100 I get a quick L R L on the indicators when they pull back in or "thanks mate, safe trip' on the CB.
It aint that hard. Yeah there are a few a--holes in trucks but most of them are just guys and gals doing a job and us caravaners are far from blameless.


Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 11:38

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 11:38
"Many a time" Sweetwill? LOL. So we are to assume you follow the slow drivers who annoy you, then pull over and have a word to them when you get a chance? And they all tell you the same story that they can travel at whatever speed they like (which is rubbish of course)? Not b..y likely. Methinks you're putting words in their mouths.


I can't be sure because I don't follow such drivers and give them the third degree but my guess is that many of them are probably completely oblivious to other drivers, or they simply don't want to be hounded into travelling faster than they are comfortable with - especially when towing. Doesn't mean they shouldn't be aware of other drivers' needs and pull over occasionally - particularly when they see a train of cars built up behind them. Basic courtesy. That said, think about the number of roads where pulling over is either not possible, or is inherently dangerous.


Being held up for 5 or 10 minutes seems like a lifetime at times, but in reality it's nothing more than a tiny inconvenience when you think about it. Lol, good advice, I'll have to follow it more in the future.
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Follow Up By: GEMAC Solar and Power - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 15:35

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 15:35
Andrew and Jen seem to be the only people on this thread with any sense>

I to have a F250 and a bigger van.
And I always chat to the truckies.

Makes perfect sense to me.

And they will always remember you next time they come across you.





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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 15:38

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 15:38
Andrew and Jen seem to be the only people on this thread with any sense>

A throw away line if ever there was one on Exploroz.
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Follow Up By: GEMAC Solar and Power - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 16:12

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 16:12
maybe so Bazooka but in this case its well founded.

Just Like your comment of basic courtesy.

And people pulling over when they see a line of cars behind them......
have a look at the number of vans that cannot see behind them due to narrow tugs and wide
vans and inadequate mirrors
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Follow Up By: sweetwill - Wednesday, Jan 09, 2013 at 07:25

Wednesday, Jan 09, 2013 at 07:25
Bazooka
No I dont follow the slow drivers and have a word to them,in fact the topic comes up at happy hour now and again, as for the learner and p platesr they should be given as much space as they need, we all started somwhere, and no I dont push to try to get the slow drivers to go faster, so Bazooka as I was always tought never assume, cheers Bill.
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Reply By: Lyn W3 - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 08:29

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 08:29
What is it about "L" plates, Driver training and "P" plates that is not working?

Four young kids killed in two accidents in Qld already this year. First one doing 150k's in a 50 zone, second two girls, 16 & 18, killed hitting a power pole and splitting the car in two.

Is it really that different from 40-50 years ago when the majority of Baby boomers, like me, got their licenses, Or are we just more aware of it now.

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Follow Up By: Notso - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:00

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:00
I think the big problem with Learner driver training is that they are being trained to "Get a Licence", not "How to Drive".

The first time they have to control a vehicle in an emergency situation is when their life depends on it. The licensing requirement should be for them to have completed things like consideration for other road users, emergency braking, skid control, defensive driving and vehicle sympathy training.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:42

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:42
What Notso posted. Also how do you teach a new driver concentration? How do you teach common sense and courtesy? Other than by experience how do you teach new drivers how to "read" the road conditions? How do you teach a new driver how to read the "body language" of another driver. Sadly a lot of them don't survive long enough to learn by experience, and some never learn and only make it to middle age and beyond by just blind luck.

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:21

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:21
hi notso
i can relate to your comments above both my son and daughter had driver trainer with a registered trainer but in talking to them i found
the course at that time didnt involve emergency braking or skid control or night driving etc
so i made a point of taking them out to my farm and gave them so valuable lessons in both car and 4wd dry and wet grass/ loose gravel and also mud we had soaks and a few creek crossings also driving towards the setting sun and sunrise
then did it on road
both day and night training with me until i was satisfied they knew that as well
they would be driving along and i would call stop and that ment as quickly and controlled as possible
my daughter did an extreme driver training course that her school started and was one of two -one boy one girl in the group who passed
the instructor was amazed at her skilled controll and asked where she got her knowledge from and she proudly said dad showed us
i have always pumped into my sibblings heads and keep it in my own line of thoughts
when all seems to be going well, expect the un-expected be very much aware
the driving instructor said he wished more parents would spend the time teaching their children as its a life saver in the unexpected driving situation
this was a big insight and experience that both have been able to use in everyday driving since and both have said dad if you hadn't have given us that insight in to what takes place and how different the vehicle reacts we wouldn't have known and both said they have both been able to use the knowledge to saving having an acident

in respect to the few cowboy truckies that are on wa rds
i have noticed those that display bad moves are a younger age group who still havent controlled their go pedal habits from car driving even though they are now in controll of huge rigs but unfortunately time ,errors and mishaps will weed them out hopefully they wont take anyone out
cheers
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Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:26

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:26
also included wheel changing where the jack points are located
and under the bonnet maintence water /oil /clutch and brake fluids/windscreen washer etc
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:34

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:34
The problem is the modern cars are powerfull, drive and handle soo danm well, when they are driven past the limit they are going sooo very fast.

We had a couple of teenge girlies killed up here just the other day..slamed into a power pole sideways, they hit soo hard the woman who called the police knew there was no point even looking.

Now this was not any rice rocket or modified vehicle it was a typical girlies hatch.

They said "speed was a factor"..no kidding....when energex have to hold the power pole up while they recover the bodies and remove the wreckage.....yeh lots of speed

Back when I was young......the XU1 torana was considered pretty fast and a bit of a handfull.....most of the bog standard hatches would blow its doors off and they corner at speeds way higher

AND, all the modern cars are designed to isolate the driver from the road feel.

The cars of the 70's and 80's felt fast.....most of em would frighten the $#@! out of you when driven fast....and to drive em realy fast you had to either have nerves of steel and reflexes to match or a death wish.

The roads too are generally too good, most of our cities are completely devoid of dirt roads.....When I learned to drive, my mother would not allow me on bitumen till she was happy with my driving on dirt..and there where dirt roads not 10 minutes away and under 15 km from the GPO.

Combine that with the unreasonable attitude to "hooning".....if ya so much as squeal ya tyres they will take ya car away.

We have a whole generation of drivers who have never learned where the limit is and how to recover a vehicle when it is past the limit.

As a result, they get out and have a go...possibly the first time they get unstuck is the last.

Please explain this to your children

cheers
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Follow Up By: Lyn W3 - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:53

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 12:53
Some good followups,

Completely agree with learning to drive on a farm, grassy paddock after an inch of rain taught you heaps about skid control. We actually had a course of 44 gallon drums set out used to race through and around them with Dad timing. 20 second penalty if we hit one.

Our cousins from the city would come out to stay during Holidays to learn to drive, It was just the done thing back then.

An App on a smart phone is not going to teach you much!
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Follow Up By: member - mazcan - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 14:36

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 14:36
hi bantam
fast cars arent fast unless some idiot presses the go pedal too far down and quickly ????they can be driven just as slow as a gutless wonder car
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 17:53

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 17:53
Lyn, in answer to your first comment on the road toll now and then, proportionally speaking, the road toll was much worse way back when. Poor roads, no seatbelts, no drink driving laws or policing, poor vehicle safety. The percentage of accidents that resulted in fatalities was far greater than it is these days.

You had young men with big ego's and powerful cars back then just as you do now. Nothing much has changed, it's just that we are living in the here and now and have a hard time casting our minds back to remember the actual "old days". When we do, we realise that things weren't that much different, it's just that our recollection has faded a bit. All I have to recall is remember the friends in my group who died on the roads in the 1970s well before they were 20. There were plenty and that was just in a reasonably sized country town.

Cheers Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Follow Up By: Lyn W3 - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 22:45

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 22:45
Mick,

You are correct in your assumption as I too remember a few friends who didn't make their 21st birthday and a few more who did more by good luck than good management. B&S Balls in Western NSW were a real killer.

But let me ask you this as a parent who has a young bloke just getting a license, How do the drivings skills compare from back in your day to the present?
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Follow Up By: Mick O - Wednesday, Jan 09, 2013 at 17:32

Wednesday, Jan 09, 2013 at 17:32
Yes they certainly were. The Roo Chasers at Balranald, Marcus Magistrates at Hay and a few more I can't recall the name of. As for the Crown Prince, I think my skills were a bit better as I'd had experience driving at an earlier age but by the same token, his city driving may be better than mine was as I was a country kid. Horses for courses I suppose.

Cheers Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
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Reply By: Member - Warrie (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:07

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:07
NSW L Platers are limited to 80kmh on freeways but a report 3 weeks ago says that the Roads Minister Duncan Gay will consider a proposal to lift it to 110kmh. This is supported by the NRMA. The argument being that they won't get any experience driving at freeway speeds if they can't go over 80. As a generalisation, 9 out of 10 holdups on the Hume SW of Sydney are due to an L plater sitting on 80 and causing a traffic choke. Big B doubles - soon to be triples - have to squeeze over to pass, as does everyone else. It's a much safer and more relaxing drive when everyone in the left lane is doing say 105-10 and the fast lane is free for the Bentleys of Singo and his ilk to zip by at 160, get pulled over but then get off the fine!!!...... W
Warrie

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Follow Up By: Member - Warrie (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:11

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:11
Link here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NMAA/message/39662
Warrie

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Follow Up By: Rockape - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:17

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 09:17
Warrie,
I thought it was Singo who past me like a bat out of hell but it wasn't. It was Warnie, late for a road safety video shoot. Funny, there was a big dark guy in a red shirt chasing him. Sorry Warnie.

RA.
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:52

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 10:52
Maybe the thought of that big guy in the red suit catching him wouldn't seem quite so bad if he had Liz nursing him back to health...lol (;-))

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 11:47

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 11:47
As a generalisation, 9 out of 10 holdups on the Hume SW of Sydney are actually due to experienced licensed drivers, impatience, roadworks.
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Follow Up By: Adams - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 14:46

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 14:46
Well put Andrew. I have been on both sides so know how it feels. I try, like you, to assist the professionals at all times.
Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Rob K (VIC) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 11:43

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 11:43
Hi RA,

Your observation caught my attention.

"My observation is that on the whole, drivers are going a lot slower although this is as much the fault of speedo inaccuracy as it is a conscious decision by drivers, most of them looking up incredulously as a B-Double cruises by doing the legal speed but you can see they’re thinking we’re speeding. Slow I can cope with, it’s the ones that speed up when the road widens to two or three lanes that bleep me to tears as they slow down again when the road narrows and you’re still stuck behind them."

Some time ago I found myself being accused of just such an act by an interstate truck driver after I lodged a complaint with the transport company about being tail gated for 8-10 kilometres on a major highway. I was driving a Holden fitted with cruise control at the time and the cruise control was set on about 103 kph. The true road speed turned out to vary between 95-99 kph based on the truck's GPS unit (according to the transport company) and the truckie alleged I was doing 95kph after I overtook him. So who is right here? I didn't have the benefit of a GPS unit to advise me of my true road speed and I assume (could be wrong) that most trucks these days have a GPS unit to monitor the speed of the truck. According to the best speed information available to me I was already over the speed limit at 103 kph. I would suggest we are not all playing on a level playing field when it comes to speed monitoring devices in vehicles. Just an observation.

That being said, I agree 100% with the sentiment of your comments; that being, we all share the road together and we should be mindful of others when travelling and take other drivers into account when we hit the roads.

Be safe out there everyone.

Cheers

Rob K
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Reply By: GEMAC Solar and Power - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 15:45

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 15:45
As I read over all the posts again
I noted a number of folk saying they are unsure of their true vehicle speed.

I suggest 99% of us have smart phones or a GPS so it is a simple simple exercise to check and recalibrate your sppe to that of your speedo.

Its Not Rocket Science.

Stop blaming everyone else for your lack of knowledge of your true vehicle speed.

Just general tyre wear will alter the cars speedo.

And replacing tyres with a different style, make, model will also alter the reading.

This was the first thing I did with my tug when I purchased it.
Its an F250 and has 315/16 Cooper ST on it.

so 98 on the speedo = 110 true speed.

Imagine if I had not checked and was doing 110 on the speed and ran into a man with a hair dryer.
Wouldn't he be keen to listen to my excuse.
BTW 110 on the speedo is 122 true.
Bit lower now as wear on tyres is at a min almost.

Regards

Geoff McKay
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Reply By: Member - Old Girl - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 21:32

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 21:32
Interesting read, every one has their own views, many the same thank goodness. Just did a big trip that took us from Queensland, Sth Aust, Vic and followed the coast back up to Qld. I must say it was a easy trip with most people behaving as we expect most of the way. Things we noticed is the 80km/hr speed limit on learners in NSW. Glad its stated that on the L plate or we wouldn't have known they couldn't go any faster. So hey we got over it and cruised along behind. There wasn't any traffic hold-ups until the area from the border up to Sydney. Holiday traffic they called it. Don't know about that at one little village. It was a pedestrian crossing that caused a 20km southbound grid lock. We just couldn't believe it. As the passenger on this one I was finding it hard to stay awake on the free ways. Way to boring.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Rockape - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 21:51

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 21:51
Young one,
good to see you and your family had a good trip.

I could see the local kids having a ball at that pedestrian crossing constantly pressing the walk button.

Have a good one,
RA.
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Follow Up By: Member - Keith P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 22:37

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 22:37
As a truck driver (semis) of 30 plus years now ...I agree fully with truckie MATT....especially about the foolheads who speed up in overtaking lanes...same result for me also.
I only tow in 4th gear with my Patrol...sitting on about 80-95 and keeping tacho under 3000revs for longevity reasons ...NOT fuel reasons.
But I am (like a truckie) always checking mirrors and monitoring UHF...and when one comes up behind I let him know I know he is there ...and work out with him when he can get by ...as they usually know the road better than me ....and it mostly always works...and is appreciated. Have had a small number abuse me as well....but they are a big minority...and this obstinate old truck driver knows how to make his rig 20 foot wide hey!!

Go the (decent ) truckies...and a good UHF !


Cheers Keith
Nothin is ever the same once I own it ...........

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Reply By: Member - Old Girl - Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 22:31

Tuesday, Jan 08, 2013 at 22:31
Yes it was fantastic. Only thingthat needed a spanner was the gas bottle to bbq. The crossing was a zebra variety.
Cheers
Sharon.
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Reply By: Herbal - Wednesday, Jan 09, 2013 at 15:10

Wednesday, Jan 09, 2013 at 15:10
I don't agree with this truckie at all. I see him as just yet another truck driving thug. He clearly thinks he has some special rights on the road.

I got news for him...You do not have rights, at all, let alone on the road. Now slow down (pun) before you all start typing away telling me how wrong I am. Check your facts first. The two most favorite ones people quote are right of free speach and right to privacy. We are not in the U.S of A. The High court of Australia back in 1997 or 99 there abouts, found that right of free speach might (not does) exsist in Australia if there are 3 or more people talking and the subject matter is politics. That is the closest anything has come to being a right in this country.

Quote of the truckie - Unfortunately you can’t counter stupidity despite the best efforts of the road safety authorities - end quote.

I can offer two suggestions that would end the "stupidity" on the roads instantly. Of course accidents are going to happen.

1. Make the people doing the wrong thing pay...in full. That is, pay for medical, pay for property damage etc, etc...pay in full everything. I believe just the cost to tax payers alone for one road death is about $500,000.

Don't tell me can't be done...it can be done. So, would it work? Of course it will, it worked just fine for dogs! We just don't see dogs roaming the streets anymore cos these days if a dog bites, the owner is looking at $150,000 min just in legal costs before even talking about compensation.

Today, a driver through stupidity goes through a red light and kills another driver. Tax payers fork out 1/2 a mil. Insurance forks out 1 mil + and a family is destroyed. The stupid driver that did the wrong thing walks away with a $250 fine and 6 months loss of license...Now, if that person thought for a second that they would be spending the rest of their lives paying off a 1 1/2 million dollar debt, they would stop on that red light!!

2. Do not allow an L or P driver to be in control of a vehicle with ANY addition or modification, including bumper stickers, seat covers etc, etc.

Think about it. We already have restrictions such as engine size for L and P drivers.

Remove the "rebel misfit bad arse" appearence and you remove the said attitude.

Impose the same restrictions for 12 months, on any driver fined for speeding, DUI, red light, minor accident etc, etc. And a life time restriction for second offence.

Trust me, people want their mag wheels and custom paint jobs. If there is any chance that they will never be allowed to have these additions they will drive sober and stop at red lights.

End of road problems.

AnswerID: 502110

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