Tyre Pressure Monitors

Submitted: Monday, May 20, 2013 at 14:30
ThreadID: 102314 Views:2647 Replies:6 FollowUps:8
This Thread has been Archived
After all the useful input I received recently on my steel rim enquiry I am now considering tyre pressure monitors. This is not a field I've investigated before so keen to get some first hand knowledge from you guys.
Standard question................pluses and minus' for Tyredog 8 Wheel Tyre Pressure Monitor TD-2300A-X08 (0 to 180 PSI.)

Thought its best to obviously get system that covers Cruiser and 4 wheels on van.

Over to you...............
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Keith P (NSW) - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 17:41

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 17:41
I have had the Tyredog system for about 2 years now (6 tyre one). It has been pretty reliable and has actually saved me a couple of tyres already...both on truck. At 300 bux a tyre ...it has nearly paid for itself already. The batteries in the transmitters last about 6-8 months..and the receiver at least 12 months if using good quality top grade alkaline batteries. My system has the transmitter which I have mounted up behind towbar and is hard wired. The only real downside I have found is that short steel valve stems need to be used as the transmitters bend the rubber ones down so that the caps touch the rims due to centrifugal force...even the stumpy short lawn mower type ones do it. Also the caps on transmitters need to have a turn or two of insulation tape around them to stop from unscrewing..and this also gives them some protection from stone damage. Apart from all the above ...nuthing has failed so far...so yeah....worth considering.

HTH.

Cheers Keith
Nothin is ever the same once I own it ...........

Lifetime Member
My Profile  Send Message

AnswerID: 511455

Reply By: JohnnyC - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 18:48

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 18:48
I have had a Tyredog 4 wheel system on my Landcruiser for a few years now and it has saved me 3 tyres so far, I can highly recommend it, still on the original batteries and no problems so far.
It has split rims and the valve stems stick out a bit but none of the sensors have been damaged, done thousands of klms on dirt roads, in town I just remove them and put the normal caps on in case they disappear.
Be careful of the internal transmitter types, tyre fitters are the natural enemy of these!
It helps to have the monitor permanently connected to the accessories, if you forget to turn it on before you drive off it can take up to 30mins before all the sensors register.
AnswerID: 511458

Reply By: AlbyNSW - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 18:51

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 18:51
I had the Tyredog setup for about three years and had it replaced under warranty in the first 3 months but ok after that. I later broke a sensor cap from stone on dirt road but still working with electrical tape on it but would now be a problem with water crossings.
On my new ute which I replaced wheels and rims I went for an internal system as I think it will last better in rough terrain plus the temperature reading is accurate as it is inside the wheel not spinning around outside. I looked at all of the makes and went with Inawise.
There are a number of good ones available as they are OEM mandatory equipment in the USA

Personally I would take advantage of going an internal system when you get new tyres as it is easy to fit but regardless of which system you go for, the main thing is to get one.
Since having a TPMS system I have managed to detect and plug every puncture without removing a wheel and have not damaged a tyre from running under inflated undetected.
They are worth their money and easily paid for them self.
AnswerID: 511459

Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:04

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:04
I think the key factor that has been mentioned above is the saving of tyres from sudden deflation in the case of a puncture.
If this is the sole reason for investing in a system, it's a good solution.

If you believe you can monitor exact tyre pressures however, I think you will be disappointed. The external systems are not all that accurate, at least mine's not.

I have posted a blog on the TPMS Australia units and discovered the variance in pressure readings as detected by the TPMS system, varies some 4psi or so from the pressures set by my manual tyre gauge.
This is purely the result of the inaccuracy of the individual external sensors rather than operating factors. The tyre gauge accuracy can be "ignored" as the same gauge was used to set each tyre to 38psi, but the result as displayed on the monitor varied from 36psi to 39psi on the four wheels.

I installed mine purely to alert me to any sudden deflation, especially when travelling on unsealed roads and tracks.
For this end result, the system will hopefully do it's job.

I would be interested in reading any input from forumites who have an internal sensor system (or a different brand of external sensors) and how accurate the readings displayed are compared with that set by initial inflation as checked by a tyre gauge.

Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 511466

Follow Up By: Member - Arsenal Phill - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:22

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:22
Yep Bill the idea is to minimise tyre damage by detecting punctures. Catch it early and hopefully everything will be good.
Just been doing a bit more reading and have found the internals as mentioned by AlbyNSW. They appeal a bit more to me than the screw on ones. Will go to the local supplier later this week and price up etc. Funny thing is the local supplier is where I got my Mickey T's, and I want to get another spare, so I'll be killing two birds with one stone.
0
FollowupID: 789720

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:35

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:35
Sandman I have found mine to be accurate, where I find the initial discrepancy is airing up you are pumping cold air into a hot tyre and it takes a few minute for the pressure reading to stabilize so when I air up if you go back to the first tyre you inflated you will find that the gauge will read differently second time around and need adjusting.

Arsenal Phil, I found that the tyre mobs new little or nothing about TPMS systems, I rang and purchased mine direct from the importer/ national distributor and then gave them to my tyre mob to install for me.
0
FollowupID: 789721

Follow Up By: Sand Man (SA) - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:46

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:46
Hi Alby,

When I set mine up, all tyres were "cold", or at least as cold as being stationary in the driveway after the sun has gone down.

One thing I have noticed is the increase in displayed pressure as the sun affects one or more sensors and/or tyres.

I believe the internal sensors would give the best and most consistent results, bearing in mine however that the internal sensors need to be removed or replaced when the internal battery has depleted.
(Are the batteries replaceable in internal sensors?)

One thing my local tyre retailer mentioned, was the need to inform them of the presence of internal sensors, least they damage them during tyre removal for any reason.



Bill


I'm diagonally parked in a parallel Universe!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 789722

Follow Up By: Member - Arsenal Phill - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:59

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 20:59
No worries Alby. My local tyre guy is officially listed as supplier by Inawise, so hopefully they'll know what they are doing.
0
FollowupID: 789723

Follow Up By: 08crd - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:09

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:09
Great for peace of mind. I take the batteries out after we return home.
Then put them n before we leave on the next trip.
Leaving them in I found them flat after about 8 months.
0
FollowupID: 789725

Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:24

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:24
Sandman the battery on the internal ones is the same battery that they use in Pacemakers and last for seven years before they need replacing
( so they say on the website )
Apparently you can depress the side of the tyre off the bead to access and remove the sensor if needed without having to remove the tyre off the rim.
I too noticed the effect of the sun on the reading with the external sensors but the internal ones I have found to be extremely consistent with their reading, they display pressure in 1/10 of a PSI increment , my Tough Dog ones were not tat accurate

Good to hear Phill, if you do go with the Inawise brand, they have two types a standard one and a 4WD one. I think the standard one is a better system as the low pressure alarm works on a loss of air pressure as a percentage of your preset PSI which is easy to reset if you alter your pressures often to suit the current road conditions whereas the 4WD version they sell have the settings preset which I think is limiting and you potentially have to lose too much air before geing allerted of a problem.
0
FollowupID: 789726

Reply By: Mick O - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:21

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:21
Phil I did a bit of a review on the two systems I have used over the years, Tyredog and Sensatyre (internal).

Tyre Pressure review


Cheers Mick


''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
Richard Maurice - 1903

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 511473

Follow Up By: Life Member - Phil B (WA) - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:53

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 21:53
x 2 for Sensatyre clamp on system

cheers
There is a lot of difference between
‘Human Being’ and ‘Being Human’.





Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 789728

Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, May 20, 2013 at 22:14

Monday, May 20, 2013 at 22:14
and by god you know how to put a tyre in harms way Phil ;-)

Cheers Mick
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
Richard Maurice - 1903

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 789731

Reply By: Idler Chris - Wednesday, May 22, 2013 at 23:25

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 at 23:25
I use Sensatyre internal band type. The monitor shows 6 tyres (2 spares on the back). The pressure is dead accurate and the temperature seems to be just as accurate. Best bit is you get accurate readings within a minute of turning the ignition on, you also do not have to be moving. I also find deflating tyres quick and easy as I use a pen on the valve for x seconds, where x is an estimate by me based on experience as I have done it so often. Having done the 4 tyres a quick check of tyre monitor and occasionally I may have to do some fine tuning. Same thing on pumping up, 30 to 45 seconds of air and they will all be where I want them. (I have an Air-On-Board compressor)
They pay for themselves with the tyres they save. Also they are a great safety factor as if you have a deflated tyre on a straight but rough road you may not immediately notice it, but if you come to a corner or have to take some evasive action anything could happen if one tyre is flat. Tyre monitors are mandatory in the US these days, not to save tyres, but to save lives. What's your life worth?
What other people think of me is none of my business.
Do unto others what you would have them do unto you.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 511642

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)