Iveco Daily Dual Cab 4x4

Submitted: Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 10:41
ThreadID: 106107 Views:14257 Replies:9 FollowUps:13
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Hi to all

I have been looking at upgrading my vehicles from a Nissan 4.2 Ute and a 100 series Landcruiser. Both of these vehicles are well set up for the purpose that we use them.

I doing this I have looked at the Iveco Daily Dual Cab 4x4. This vehicle would be able to provide the dual functions of camping and travelling that we do by carrying our custom built tray back camper and towing the Coromal 535 van.

Does anyone have any experience or comments on this vehicle which is relatively new in Australia as it appears to be a versatile vehicle and would possible suit our multi role requirements.

I have researched the internet as much as I can and mostly reports and videos seem to come out of Europe which have very different climates and conditions to Australia.
A new vehicle is being offered at $104K on road with a 4 ton aluminium tray, custom bull bar and winch which compared to a 200 series LC is very good.

Whilst I understand the ride in this vehicle will be very different to what we are used to with the GU Coil Cab ute and the 100 series I am interested in getting information on performance, capability and reliability of the Iveco.

This vehicle would be used for travelling and exploring, not the normal daily drive or shopping trolley.

Any comments, knowledge or information that you can offer would be appreciated.

Regards
John
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Reply By: Hoyks - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 12:47

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 12:47
Most of the ones you see in Europe are set up so they can get out of Europe and into North Africa. Conditions there are not too much different to Australia.
AnswerID: 525839

Reply By: Kumunara (NT) - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 13:50

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 13:50
John

You have probably already seen the review on the link below:
http://www.carsguide.com.au/news-and-reviews/car-reviews-road-tests/iveco_daily_55s_review

Looks like a good vehicle for what you want. 15l/100km is a bit thirsty but it is a big heavy vehicle.
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Reply By: Winner W - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 15:19

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 15:19
Very new and popular in Southern Africa for touring and towing. One mob does Kalahari desert recoveries with his. He recently towed a Patrol lwb on a trailer over kilometers of sand dunes with the tray loaded and cabin full of people. Videos on youtube. Would love to have one for my trips.
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Reply By: Member - Michael A (ACT) - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 15:55

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 15:55
104K on roads seems to be a tad high when i have seen them advertized in Australia for 88000 plus on road no tray etc but they shouldnt add 16000 to the price. Ive seen bullbars advertized in oz for about 1500 add a PTO winch for a couple of grand' should still be about 97k at most

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Follow Up By: Iza B - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 17:58

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 17:58
I was quoted $85k about a year ago when the first 9 arrived in Australia. As a 4x4 they are well reported overseas and a quick look underneath one convinced me they should do the business.

Iza
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Reply By: Member - wicket - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 17:58

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 17:58
Read all the good and bad by an aussie bloke who owns one here

http://www.goingbush.com/iveco.html
AnswerID: 525864

Reply By: Member - Paul G11 - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 21:22

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 21:22
Hello John,

I've just picked up a dual cab Iveco from Ridgeline in Brisbane, 88k purchase price and 13k for wheels, snorkel, bullbar, headlight upgrade, upgraded wheels and tyres, tyre pressure monitor, water tank and tow bar. I've gone with a winch cradle hitch points front and rear rather than a fixed winch.

I had a patrol for 11 years and while that was a great ute, it struggled a bit off road carrying the slide on camper. I haven't had the Iveco on any serious terrain yet but it's a pleasure to drive on road, plenty of grunt and handles well for a truck. With the 24 gears, good clearance and diff locks all round it should handle the rough stuff easy enough.

I've been averaging 16.5 ltr/100 klm so far with out the camper on the back and hopefully this will improve as the engine loosens up.

I'm getting a 2.6 mtr ali tray made up for it here in Hervey Bay so will fit the camper and still have room for a storage box behind the cab, plenty of room in the back of the cab for storage as well.

Can't say much about reliability/durability as yet but from what I have read on overseas forums, they don't have too many issues. The electrics worry me a bit after owning the 4.2 patrol, but thats the way it goes with modern vehicles. The chassis and suspension look bullet proof so no worries there.

The fuel tank is bit small at 90 litres, Ridgeline make a plumbed reserve tank for it but I will rig up four or five jerry can holders under the tray.

Hope this helps mate, feel free to PM me if you want any more info.

Regards,
Paul
AnswerID: 525875

Follow Up By: Member - John M (NSW) - Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 08:28

Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 08:28
Hi Paul
Thank you for your information, I've just had a revised quote from the Sydney dealer which has come in at $98K which includes the upgrades tyres, uhf radio, heavy duty aluminium tray, vertical exhaust which is now a more attractive price.
As with you my 4.2 GU Patrol is a fantastic vehicle it struggles in carry my camper. I have just fitted air bag suspension and King adjustable shockers all round which carries the camper much better although I am yet to give it a test off road.
The Iveco attracted me for many reasons and it could be a very good vehicle to replace both my 4wd's. Unfortunately these vehicles are in very good, like new condition and like most people become attacted to them.
Although the Iveco has a few short falls like the fuel tank etc. I see these as minimal and can be easy upgraded to a vehicle that will cater for all my needs.
If I consider the money that I have spent on all the fruit for both the 100 series and the Nissan to make them the vehicles they are I see a far lesser amount needed to be spent on the Iveco to become a good touring vehicle with excellent off road capabilities.
Going from a V8 & 4.2 litre engine back to a 3 litre engine in a heavier vehicle has been my concern although the Iveco seems to compensate this in its gearing.
Fuel is not a concern as it couldn't be any worse than the 100 series V8 and I also own 2 boats that consume approx. 6000 litres every 2 days. I have always been of the view that there is no replacement for cubic inches as I see many people towing large vans with 3 litre engines and wonder how long will these last.
I see the Iveco as a vehicle that can be set up like you are doing that will suit my needs. I just wish Isuzu would bring out a similar vehicle.
Thank you again for your information and good luck with your vehicle.
Regards
John
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Reply By: Going Bush - Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 22:02

Thursday, Feb 06, 2014 at 22:02
As mentioned the biggest disappointment is they only have a 90l tank , but for what they are they are economical. Value for your dollar is amazing frankly I can't work out why the price is that low.

AND they do fit into a normal sized car parking spot too ( but not multilevel :)

Also after a Td5 Landrover I'm not scared by the electronics, they are quite basic with proven bosch electronics and have inbuilt diagnostic display on the dashboard.

once you get into the outback dirt roads they come into their own, corrugations and bull dust holes are smoother than any other vehicle Ive ever driven. Im 6 months and 13,000km in and can't get the smile off my face.
AnswerID: 525885

Follow Up By: Member - John M (NSW) - Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 08:41

Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 08:41
Going Bush

Thanks for your reply.
That is what I was looking for in regards to the suspension and ride.
I believe the price is very good for what the vehicle provides and how it can be set up.
Larger fuel tanks is not a problem and there is plenty of space for water tanks, storage boxes etc that we all fit to smaller vehicles.
How do you find the stability of the vehicle and what is the main purpose of your vehicle ie. carrying a camper or towing a van or both.
I have found that vehicles once loaded become very different from the vehicle in the flesh and this is where the money needs to be spent when we want to use them for what they were supposedly built. Wouldn't it be great to buy a 1 tonner that actually carried 1 tonne like it is supposedly advertised.
I hope the Iveco still keeps the smile on your face for many more thousands of kilometres.
Regards
John
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Follow Up By: Going Bush - Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 11:07

Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 11:07
Hey John, quite the opposite infact, overseas the iveco is rated at 5500kg, here it is optional 5200kg gvm on a truck licence or 4495kg gvm on a car license, so no fear of overloading or over stressing, you know it has another 1000kg of ability even when you are at the car licence GVM. the more you load it up the smoother it gets, you can not feel any difference in power empty to loaded except when towing as well you need to change back on the hills , but there are plenty of gears to play with as well as the under drive that you can swap into and out of on the fly.

ours is the one on the blog www.goingbush.com/iveco.html

a youtube vid of corrugations and sandy section,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u85o1-ZyILY
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 23:44

Friday, Feb 07, 2014 at 23:44
I don't own one or have driven one...but one matter that must be understood.....its a truck and is designed to perform fully loaded.
Commercial buyers of trucks expect to load them to capacity..if not they would have baught a smaller truck.

ALL of the pasenger derived light commercials are designed to barely tolerate being loaded to their maximum legal capacity.

The other thing is the air suspended seats.....there are plenty of people who would realy like air suspended seats in their 4wd utes.

You would have a hard time buying a real truck without at least an air suspended drivers seat.....you would have a harder time getting someone to drive it.

The number of gears will also be a big help.
having the right gear for the job and beeing able to keep the engine right on the power band makes a very big difference.

a few years ago I drove a heavy tipper for a while....mine only had 6 forward gears...we had an almost identical truck with a 15 speed road ranger......he left me for dead everywhere especially fuly loaded on hills.

Need a truck..buy a truck.

cheers
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FollowupID: 808062

Reply By: Eric Experience - Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 11:27

Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 11:27
John.
If you are not interested in towing a caravan because it defeats the purpose of having an off road vehicle, consider a Mercedes for the same money as the Iveco. More reliable and about half the fuel consumption. Eric.

http://www.oberaigner.com/en/products/mercedes-benz/sprinter-4x4/

AnswerID: 525972

Follow Up By: Member - Adrian L (QLD) - Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 14:45

Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 14:45
Eric
where can you get them in Australia?
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Follow Up By: Going Bush - Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 17:26

Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 17:26
"Towing a caravan defeats the purpose of having an off road vehicle "

how so ??

the idea is your tow the caravan to a caravan park or bush camp use it as a base, then go 4WD touring / exploring .

The Mercedes Sprinter does not have low range, and is IFS , more an AWD than a real 4x4 so can't be compared to the Iveco.

Fuso Canter and Isuzu NPS 4x4 are the closest things. The Canter has the same engine as the Iveco , the Isuzu engine is a lot bigger, neither have as good gearing , parabolics, difflocks or super singles so more money needs to be spent to get them 'capable'.

One thing the Iveco misses out on is it lacks an exhaust brake. The others including Sprinter have one as standard.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 20:00

Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 20:00
I understand that mitsubishi, hino and isuzu all do 4wd trucks too, but you may have to step up into the medium rigid 6 to 12 ish tonne range.

One thing with those that currently is not with the IVECO is that they do come up second hand....ocasionaly.

I recently met a bloke who baught an Isuzu 4wd medium rigid to tow his boat..it was an ex fire truck.

cheers
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FollowupID: 808116

Follow Up By: Eric Experience - Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 21:43

Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 21:43
Adrian.
You can order them from any Mercedes commercial dealer. Don't expect them to have one in stock. The combinations of motor transfer case and wheel base are almost endless so the vehicle is built to your order.

Gone bush.
You should get your facts rite before giving a spray. The sprinter can be ordered with low range and diff locks. The suspension is superb with parabolics all round. The idea of dumping a van and then coming back for it is a dumb idea, We have tried every combination of vehicles and the Sprinter is by far the best for exploring except the most chopped out tracks, we are prepared to walk the last 100 metres or so as a trade of for the comfort safety and economy. Eric
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FollowupID: 808131

Follow Up By: Going Bush - Saturday, Feb 08, 2014 at 22:05

Follow Up By: Member - Adrian L (QLD) - Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 09:47

Sunday, Feb 09, 2014 at 09:47
Eric Experience
Regarding: getting facts right……the Sprinter has no diff locks and parabolic springs only on the rear.

This video should clear things up a bit!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oO8zt8byDiI
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Reply By: Eric Experience - Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 21:56

Monday, Feb 10, 2014 at 21:56
Adrian.
I am with you on clearing things up. All sprinters from the first model in 1998 use a leaf spring at the front. The van shown in the link is the base version. The off road conversion are done by Oberaigner in Austria, When you order a 4x4 Sprinter you can have any thing you want including diff locks or even a 6x6. If you can be bothered you can have a look at mine. Eric.
AnswerID: 526162

Follow Up By: Going Bush - Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 16:28

Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 16:28
Yes would like to see your Sprinter, do you have any photos, It sounds fantastisch

Of course you can get any vehicle you like optioned up by Aftermarket vendors…… if you have enough money.

Any Sprinter I have ever looked at have independent front suspension with wishbones and Macpherson struts, they have never had front leaf suspension.

Herr Expreience, I am not giving them a 'spray' at all, Indeed they are a great vehicle but its you who needs to get you facts 'rite'

http://www.around-oz.com/innovations_mh/sprinter_suspension.htm
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Follow Up By: Eric Experience - Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 21:55

Tuesday, Feb 11, 2014 at 21:55
Going bush.
I suggest you look a bit harder at the front suspension, they all use a leaf spring. Which particular part do you want a photo of? Eric
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FollowupID: 808425

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