Using daytime running lights

Submitted: Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 09:11
ThreadID: 108618 Views:2727 Replies:12 FollowUps:42
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Has it come time for us to all use headlights or daytime running lights in the day. Over the years the number of trucks and vans has increased by quite a bit, also the length of vehicles has increased.

I have seen many answers that state, if you can’t see an oncoming vehicle you shouldn’t be driving, Well, there are a lot of reasons for not seeing the vehicle such as the sun behind them, vehicles blending in with the surrounds, heat haze, shadows, distraction and just being plain being tired. In passing any considerable length vehicle we all know how long we are on the wrong side of the road and if your passing maneuver is half way through and you then spot an oncoming vehicle, things can become very ugly, very quickly.

Many will have noticed that the Led daytime running lights on euro vehicles are easier to see than headlights, in fact they on reading an article in PowerTorque they state that the led lights emit much more light that is directed at the other vehicle. One problem with this, is if you install aftermarket Daytime running light the retards of this world will use them at night, causing problems for others.

In the article and this is their quote.
“From in depth accident studies that failing to see another road user in time (or at all) is a contributing factor in 50% of all daytime accidents. For daytime intersection accidents this increases to as much as 80%.”

I personally hope they bring in the lights on all new vehicles, and at least require all older vehicles to run with headlights on. Many at present don’t even seem to be able to turn them on around sunset and sunrise.


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Reply By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 09:39

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 09:39
I don't think that daytime running lights are as necessary here as they would be in europe or northern america.
In those places light can be marginal for much of the day for much of the year.

Like those fog lights that people like to run with their headlights, in this country I don't think they are a help for most of us most of the time.

As for this failure to be seen.......the europeans are pushing this one right across the board.

That is why every man and his dog is wearing High Visability clothing.

I think if large numbers of cars ran daytime running lights the safety effects would be deminished to the point of being pointless........like it is with High Vis clothing.

Not long ago, the only people who wore High vis clothing where those who where engaged in activities where there was clear risk involved and bright clothing helped with that risk.
Now we have a situation where High vis clothing is so common that it has become devalued...to the point where criminals wear it when they want to blend in.

Let me tell you some of the places I work, If I don't want to be noticed I wear High Vis...I become just another one of those yellow men.....we have done tests.....the management on these venuses know is well.....but if two of us walk along one in high vis and the other in plain clothes.....the one in plain clothes will get a smile and a wave the one in high vis will simply be ignored......and we have rung the changes to test this.


Not so long ago, if there was someone in a car park or on the road side in High Vis they where going something......like diging a hole...now it is more likley they are just taking the shopping to the car or walking home.

These people who say that there are accidents where not being seen was a contributing factor do not want to admit that the reason that what ever it was was not seen, most of the time is that the person at fault DID NOT LOOK....no amount of high vis or daytime running lights will solve that problem.


Just for thaught......all these extranius lights may in fact obscure things or be a distraction.

many years ago, I saw an exibit at a science museum that showed without a doubt that visability would be improved if we all turned our headlights OFF at night on well lit streets.......bet ya that never saw the light of day in the road safety press.

No we don't need yet another european nanny state idea.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 10:50

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 10:50
Geez Bantam, you really have it in for high-visibility clothing don't you?
My wife was knitting you a bright pink pullover for your birthday but I'll tell her not to bother now! LOL

And I won't even bother with the lighting issue!!!!
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:15

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:15
I thought the thread was about DRLs not High Viz clothing. If someone is driving a vehicle with High Vis clothing it doesn't help other drivers see the vehicle.
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Follow Up By: MactrolPod - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:15

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:15
Fair go I'm struggling with Hi-Vis comment, I see a person in Hi-Vis well before a non wearer when driving. Plus when we are working around machinery I feel better wearing it! You would have us wear camo gear!? Because I wear the stuff I might be more aware, I don't know.

The lights on during the day does appear to work for me but more of a curiosity, maybe that will wear off.

What bugs me is all the signs on the road, leave the road signs facing on coming traffic and all other signs removed or parallel to the road to reduce the clutter, its a nightmare. Miss a sign and your speeding or in the wrong lane etc.
I'm from the country and hate driving in the city trying to keep an eye on everything, in saying that our town has advertising everywhere too.
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Follow Up By: The Bantam - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:43

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:43
daytime running lights and high vis clothing are one and the same issue in a differnt application.

I have no problem with the wearing of High Vis in situations where it is waranted and benificial, but expecting everybody to wear it all the time regardless of the actual risk, devalues it and makes it less effective.

I realy would like high vis to work for me when there is a real need and benifit.....but as it stands and as it is going high vis is just so common it just becomes part of the background of visual noise and people are taking less and less notice of it.

The same goes for use of lights during the day......I am perfectly happy to turn my headlights or parking lights on where there is reduced visability...as required by law.....But it is my asertion that if every vehicle has daytime running lights on all the time the roads will just end up a sea of lights all day every day and the benifit will be lost.

If particular safety measure is effective in a particular situation it does not logically follow that it is benificial in all situations and should be used all the time.

If it was so we would have safety belts on arm chairs.

Back on the matter of visability.
Several seurveys and reseach has been done concering the relative safety benifits of cars painted certain colours.....it is clear and well proven that cars painted certain colours are more inclined to not be seen and be involved in accidents......surely it would be far more effective to ban black or blue cars than to mandate daytime running lights.
Hell maybe we should all be driving pink or yellow cars with reflective stripes down the side.
But then the roads would be a mass of pink and yellow reflective cars and we would be back where we started.......having to look where we are going.

cheers
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Follow Up By: Slow one - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:03

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:03
Garrycol,
No it is about safety gloves, safety boots, safety glasses and nannies. LOL.
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:39

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:39
Too late, Vehicle Standard (Australian Design Rule 76/00 - Daytime Running Lamps) 2006, all new cars have to have them
John and Jan

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Follow Up By: AlanTH - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:04

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:04
When the EU dictators started pushing for vehicles to use headlights at all times, motorcycle organisations were dead against it because they again became invisible amongst a sea of lights especially in foul weather conditions.
I can see their point as a lot of motorists don't see them at all good weather or bad.
Problem is most of the road safety "experts" aren't drivers of anything except office seats....but they're the ones our pollies listen to.
AlanH.
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:36

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:36
AlanTH ..... there has been a lot of research over the last few years about what you are talking about..... the research showed for 80% of drivers headlights and hi vis gear worked and for the other 20% it made no difference, they put it down to the 20% who it made no difference to paid very little attention to there surrounding whilst driving.

The same argument has be raging for a few years about riding with correct bike gear like gloves and jackets...... you should read the letters of those against it and the talk of their rights; it's pathetic.

BTW since 2008/09 all new bike have had to have lights on from factory and it is defectable to bypass or alter the lights on.
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Follow Up By: AlanTH - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:52

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:52
I agree with bikes having lights on but in murky conditions I see their point that with all others using their lights (or those that care anyway) it does make them harder to spot.
I've always prided myself on being an aware driver and take extra care in those conditions but apart from bikes being harder to see, so also are the idiots who refuse to turn their lights on at all or just use sidelights which are next to useless.
Whilst driving a bus not long ago I nearly turned across the front of a vehicle without lights in real foul conditions......it was one of our well trained WA traffic cops. Immediately after nearly being pranged he turned his lights on so he knew full well the problem.
AlanTH.


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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:49

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:49
I think the benefits of lights on in all conditions far out weighs the negatives, thats if there is any negatives........ Going by what others have said; does that mean at night or low light conditions people are going to see you better as all the other vehicles around you are driving with lights on and your will be the odd one out having no lights on?

Don't think so!
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Follow Up By: OutBack Wanderers - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:05

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:05
ADR 76/00 2006 might be on the books but not enforced, our new 2010 CRDI i30 does not have DRL and none of the other 100 vehicles we looked at before purchasing our car

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Reply By: garrycol - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:20

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 11:20
I think DRLs are a great idea and do achieve what they are designed for.

ADRs require DRLs to switch off when headlights are turned on so, aftermarket fitments should comply with this - but of course we know many will not rig them as such and blind people at night.

In OEM fittings on vehicles that have combined DRLs and parkers you will see that when the headlights are turned on (or parkers switched on) the DRLs dim to parker brightness.

Garry
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:38

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:38
If fitting aftermarket DLR's you must also comply to where they are fitted.
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Reply By: Les PK Ranger - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 12:31

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 12:31
I feel (and do this myself always) driving with low beams on should be mandatory on highways when country driving.
You see a car approaching far better, and at much greater distance, than without lights on.

I think headlights at the normal height are better than DRLs as these are usually placed much lower and sometimes seen later than headlights.

Approaching (passing / overtaking) traffic and traffic turning out onto / off highways etc are the main situations that this would benefit.

In my opinion, there would be many less deaths each year if people used this common sense driving technique, far more lives would be saved as compared to most other GOVCO road safety focus.
Fatigue and inattention are the other issues that causes far more road deaths than say slight speed indiscretions when overtaking etc.

Driving with lights on around the suburbs is also highly recommended for the same reasons, but especially at dusk or in dismal weather.
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Reply By: Bazooka - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:27

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 13:27
You're probably right Slow One but before that's implemented I'd like to see self imploding fog lights, or perhaps a nasty in-cabin spray when fog lights are used in normal conditions - like the things they (used to?) put on dog collars to discourage barking. I don't know if it's a problem with the way vehicle manufacturers set up the lights in modern cars or just ignorance by drivers but the "wall of light" in suburban driving is becoming more and more prevalent.

Saw a bloke in dark gear crossing the road the other night. He had the silver reflective stripes on his dark pants and coat cuffs and wow did he light up when my headlights caught him. A very effective safety feature and quite unobtrusive in daylight.
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:06

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:06
"Saw a bloke in dark gear crossing the road the other night. He had the silver reflective stripes on his dark pants and coat cuffs and wow did he light up when my headlights caught him."

As distinct from the bloke in black clothes, including gloves and beanie, wandering a dark street at night and who I nearly hit. Mandatory ear buds and phone, of course.

And the kid (old enough to know better) on a bike, in the dark, no lights going flat chat down a hill on the wrong side, no streetlights. I did a left turn out of a side street right into his path 'cos I didn't see him, which scared the bejesus out of both of us.

Sometimes I wonder if pedestrians and cyclists should be registered and licensed before being allowed out of the front door unsupervised.
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Follow Up By: Member - Frank P (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:22

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:22
"Sometimes I wonder if pedestrians and cyclists should be registered and licensed before being allowed out of the front door unsupervised."

I'll take that back. Let them go, let nature and evolution take their courses and cleanse the gene pool.
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Reply By: Sand Man (SA) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 14:52

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 14:52
I believe daytime running lights are a bit of a wank, at least for country driving, and they would achieve nothing to improve visibility.

Headlights on during the day however, is an entirely different thing.
Consider this. You are sitting behind a slower moving truck or vehicle towing a caravan and wish to safely pass it.
If approaching vehicles have their headlights on, it is much easier to pick them out in the distance and assist you in deciding if you have time to pass.
Also, as you pull out and accelerate past the slower vehicle, it is much easier for oncoming traffic to see you, if you have your headlights on.

This was proven to me, time and time again on our recent trip to the Kimberley.

"Daytime running lights", at least those poofy little rows of LED lights around the headlight glass, would give no such visibility assistance in this sort of case.
Bill


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Follow Up By: Slow one - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:59

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 15:59
Bill,
those poofy little lights actually give off much more visible light directed at the other vehicle than low beam headlights.

I believe country driving is where these lights will come into their own.

Buy yourself a copy of Powertorque and have a look for yourself.
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Follow Up By: cookie1 - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 19:51

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 19:51
Totally agree Sandman(SA), we had ours on the whole time the car was in motion, one of the benefits of the 200GX, the lights turn on & off with the ignition if you leave the lights turned on at the stalk.

Don't care about others opinions I found it much better when others approaching had theirs on.

cheers
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Reply By: fisho64 - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:14

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:14
one thing with the daylight lighting, most motor bikes use them now.
They certainly make them more noticeable but on the other hand being only one light it is MUCH harder to judge how far away they are especially if on high beam and obscuring the actual bike.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:18

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:18
Motorbikes can be a pain. Many, I daresay most, run on high beam and even in daylight that can be glaring when getting close. low beam is equally visible for safety.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:42

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:42
Having had bikes for over 40 years I can tell you that the vast majority DO NOT run on high beam. The advent of LED headlights sees low beam being brighter. It is a proven fact that hi-vis is not the answer either. With modern bikes as soon as you turn the ignition on your low beam comes on. When I ride in a group I find it a hell of a lot easier to see who is behind me when they have a headlight on. In the majority of motorbike accidents the answer from the car driver is normally....I didn't see him...this is regardless of the bike having its headlight on!! It is also proven, as someone else pointed out, that hi-vis vests also do little assist in being seen...I agree that headlights should be on during the daylight hours for all vehicles. Most of my work is driving country roads with heavy traffic volumes. The mornings and twilight periods see the large gum trees casting shadows over the roads and the mottled effect is very good at camouflaging a car or bike.

Of course it helps if you don't get idiots overtaking in ridiculous places and not allowing a margin for error!!
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Follow Up By: disco driver - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:52

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:52
Alan,
Motorbikes do not have wanker style fog lights to blind you with, unlike a fair proportion of cars on surburban roads, or poorly adjusted headlamps which do the same thing.

While I'm on this subject, many of the euro type vehicles with the LEDs around the headlight as DRLsare also not blameless when it comes to blinding oncoming vehicles either.

Disco.
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:32

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:32
What about those super bright flashing led lights that a lot of cyclists are starting to use - don't know how many times I've copped a direct flash which temporarily blinds me for about 2 seconds - it's like a welding flash ! How dangerous are they !!!


Cheers

Gazz


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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:57

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:57
As a long term bike rider myself Bigfish is right and I support everything he said, I don't ride on high beam in traffic..... When I ride I try to be the most annoying person on the roads to other vehicles around me without being dangerous or stupid.... That way they see you and know where you are.

No use sitting in blind spots and the complain when they don't see you.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:05

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:05
I'd be interested to read the research which suggests hi-viz clothing doesn't help bikes - motorised or otherwise. Given the tiny numbers of riders/bikers who actually wear hi-viz stuff I'd be more than skeptical about any such conclusions.
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 21:44

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 21:44
Subscribe to Australian Motorcycle News, they have been discussing it for over 18 months with some very good scientific research on the matter.

Do a Google search for "hi vs clothing for motorbike riders".

Have a look here..... One I found quickly.
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/bike-blog/2013/jan/10/cycling-high-visibility-safe-fluorescent
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 22:06

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 22:06
Absolutely nothing in that article to suggest anything other than the obvious "contrast helps". I could count on the fingers of one hand the number of motorcyclists I've seen with bright/fluoro gear on and that suggests to me that any conclusions as to its effectiveness would be primarily assumption. There are obviously many reasons why motorists "don't see" bikers (including bike placement on the road as you indicated) but since most of those excuses occur in "city" accidents I don't see that the country contrast argument has any legs at all.
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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 06:24

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 06:24
AS a keen motorcyclist Bazooka I read many articles and subscribe to a few forums. There have been "scientific" studies overseas and it was proven that the wearing of hi vis vests made no difference to a motorists awareness of bikes. After the release of one such paper in France there was a mass protest at the suggestion of hi-vis being made compulsory. The idiot pollies thought it a good idea BUT studies found otherwise. Issue vetoed!!. Maybe all pedestrians and cyclists should be forced to wear them as well.......

I am all for safety. I wear a "colourful" leather jacket, chromed up Harley and lights on. Have still had near misses from dopey motorists who consider them selves the owner of the road. I also hate people on pushbikes...but I treat them as a road user and use caution when overtaking. The strobe like red light some of them use is very effective. Slightly annoying but a bloody effective way of making your presence known.Daytime running lights cannot possibly have a negative effect...So why not use them?
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 08:42

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 08:42
Bazooka...... there is no evidence saying hi vis is bad but what most information say is it has minimal impact if any at all.

What that link did say and you must of mist it was......


"The authors looked at 12 studies dating back as far as 1969, a number of which seemed to show that a fluorescent jacket or similar garb made riders more visible. However, the paper notes that many of these put the bikes against relatively uniform backdrops rather than the every-varying contrast of a moving landscape.

One study, from 2011, appeared to show that drivers saw moving motorbikes more quickly if there was a greater colour contrast between the background and the rider's clothes. Another, from last year, concluded that depending on the road and traffic the most visible rider apparel could be a high-vis jacket, a white jacket or even a black jacket."


So what the research showed was it all depends on the back ground and surrounding colours and black or white could be more efficient then a hi vis orange, green or yellow. (depending on the road and traffic the most visible rider apparel could be a high-vis jacket, a white jacket or even a black jacket)
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 18:01

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 18:01
Yeh BigFish I'm aware of the uproar in regards to hi-viz and I don't think it ought to be mandatory without thoroughly convincing evidence of its efficacy. I suspect the argument for banning certain colour cars (silver, for example) would be at least as strong. Don't have a bike any longer but when I did I admit to giving scant regard to visibility (other than by riding "smart") - my protective riding gear was black, pre-viz, so not even reflective strips.

I didn't miss that bit of generalised waffle at all Olcoolone. No "research" was required to come up with that conclusion - which I suspect was based on nothing more than a few responses to basic questions. Given the constantly changing background in city environments it says absolutely nothing other than to confirm that being visible (which hi-viz helps in most cases) is the name of the game. The only credible evidence would be a comparison of stats for regular hi-viz riders V the rest.

I note there is still a push by authorities in both France and Britain towards hi-viz gear. Presumably they've looked at the evidence in depth considering the obvious backlash against compulsory implementation. I think they're going about it the wrong way - instead of alienating people they ought to look at an incentive for riders to use hi-viz stuff, eg via a rego or licence discount.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 18:47

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 18:47
Yeh BigFish I'm aware of the uproar in regards to hi-viz and I don't think it ought to be mandatory without thoroughly convincing evidence of its efficacy. I suspect the argument for banning certain colour cars (silver, for example) would be at least as strong. Don't have a bike any longer but when I did I admit to giving scant regard to visibility (other than by riding "smart") - my protective riding gear was black, pre-viz, so not even reflective strips.

I didn't miss that bit of generalised waffle at all Olcoolone. No "research" was required to come up with that conclusion - which I suspect was based on nothing more than a few responses to basic questions. Given the constantly changing background in city environments it says absolutely nothing other than to confirm that being visible (which hi-viz helps in most cases) is the name of the game. The only credible evidence would be a comparison of stats for regular hi-viz riders V the rest.

I note there is still a push by authorities in both France and Britain towards hi-viz gear. Presumably they've looked at the evidence in depth considering the obvious backlash against compulsory implementation. I think they're going about it the wrong way - instead of alienating people they ought to look at an incentive for riders to use hi-viz stuff, eg via a rego or licence discount.
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Follow Up By: olcoolone - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 19:46

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 19:46
If it did work they would introduce it tomorrow...... I am not saying it is good or bad. But for me I don't notice fluro gear anymore, many years ago when it first came out I noticed it but now it's just the norm like red, black and white cars.

If you have a look at car colour safety ratings white is the most visible and the safest followed closely by all the other colours..... Yes closely, if hi vis colours worked as good as they say it would be demonstrated in car colours....... What most studies have found is not one colour is the best for everything and some can work against them selves in different varying light..... Maybe if we carried 4 different colours and changed them all the time we would be safe.

Like anything there is a lot of science behind colours including how they stand out, how we associate to them and how they affect our actions and mood.

So to say one or a few is the best is just plain wrong as there is more that comes into play.



Seen a interesting thing today..... Aussie Post delivering letters on their fluro green bike ridden by a guy in fluro green riding gear, found it interesting they decided to use green as most of the time they are riding on foot paths that all seem to have green grass and yes he did blend in but luckily he had his headlight on and thats what caught my attention from a long distance...... Not hi vis!
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Reply By: Freshstart - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:28

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 16:28
In a word no.
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Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:45

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 18:45
x2

- if they can't see the bright red 40 with the reflective silver canopy, a couple of aneamic headlights ain't gonna do it....
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Follow Up By: Slow one - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:01

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:01
Put the sun behind you and they may very well not see you.

I don't believe it is about who can see you, but who you can see, that is unless they are all driving a red and silver bigger vehicle.
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Reply By: olcoolone - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:28

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:28
I think everyone should travel with there lights on during the day either headlights or DRL's.

Over the years as my eyesight naturally degrades cars that I use to see kilometres away seem to blend in with the surroundings.

The distance we can see vehicles with there lights on in day time compared with no lights is 10 fold and I think many accidents could be avoided it they were seen earlier.

I think it's a no brainer and why would you not want to be seen...... many who don't like things like this are the ones who think their rights are being eroded away and hate getting told what they should;d and shouldn't do.

Maybe if they looked when travelling and noted the difference in viability and distance they can see other vehicles with lights on and lights off they might have a different view of the situation.

All new motorbikes since 2008/09 have had lights you can not turn off....... like the car people there was a big outcry of rights by motorbikes to a point there was protests where people rode with their lights blanked out with cardboard...... yes brain dead!
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:31

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 17:31
Fair go, next thing you'll be expecting drivers to use indicators!

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Follow Up By: Bigfish - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 19:38

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 19:38
Alright Shaker...I'll bite....what's an indicator??.......lol


I,m sure there are many road users who are afraid to use them!!!!at least it seems like that at times
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Follow Up By: Slow one - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:06

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:06
Olcoolone, I would thank you with the button but that isn't working for me. So here is a written thanks.
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Follow Up By: Echucan Bob - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 00:01

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 00:01
Totally agree OCO. I just wish oncoming police cars also had a clearly visible means of identification so you could slow down appropriately and avoid contributing to the state coffers.
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Reply By: Freshstart - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 19:42

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 19:42
I always wondered what that lever was for.
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Follow Up By: mikehzz - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:13

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:13
I had to use hand signals on my first car. It sounds like it would be perfect or you. :-)
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Follow Up By: Freshstart - Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:26

Sunday, Jul 06, 2014 at 20:26
And then they came up with those little arms that popped out of the B pillar. That made it easier to hold the drink in your right hand and not spill it out the window when you signalled a stop etc. Remember the stop signal!!
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FollowupID: 819439

Reply By: Penchy - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 09:26

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 09:26
I always thought that headlights were to be turned on when the street lights come on. I don't turn my lights on during the day for numerous reasons, one being my car does not have an alarm that goes off when the ignition is off and the lights are on. So to save me forgetting and coming back to a dead battery, the lights come on when I need them.
AnswerID: 535580

Follow Up By: Slow one - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 12:45

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 12:45
Penchy,
Headlights should be turned on when the sun goes down and turned off can be turned off when the sun comes up. They should also be turned on during low light or adverse weather conditions.

The lights I am talking about turn on and off automatically with the ignition so there is no problem with leaving them on.

All mining vehicles have this feature as mobile equipment is the biggest killer of all.
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FollowupID: 819463

Follow Up By: Member - Scott M (NSW) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 15:52

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 15:52
One of the issues I'm dealing with commuting in Sydney right now are these cars (or 4wd's) with auto (and badly adjusted) headlights. Some of the 4bies come with HID standard, however the auto dipping doesn't account for the height difference between a 4wd and a small commuter car.

To put it bluntly, they're effing annoying, even in daylight. I spend half my time with the the rear view mirror on dim, even in daylight.

It's great you can be seen, however I've got to remove the floating dots in my eyes on a regular basis...
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FollowupID: 819471

Follow Up By: Slow one - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 17:48

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 17:48
Scott,
Yep, I know where you are coming from and most of those lights will be aftermarket rubbish that should have never been fitted. It is a shame that many fit and getaway with these bull bleep lights. Until recently I drove a very big white thing on the highways until decided to travel again, and being limited to 100 kph it helps heaps if someone has their lights on.

Even in the big thing I ran with my lights on.


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FollowupID: 819482

Follow Up By: Penchy - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 18:35

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 18:35
Sorry champ but I don't much care what they do in the mines. It's a completely different environment, with drivers spending many more hours behind the wheel than your typical commuter. Just to repeat, the lights come on when I need them on. It's not law to drive with them on, so until it is, see rule number 1.
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FollowupID: 819486

Follow Up By: Slow one - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:16

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 20:16
Penchy,
that big white thing I mentioned runs on the highway all the time and has nothing to do with mines. it was an example and my observations that have come from many many highway kilometres in big things.
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FollowupID: 819500

Reply By: Alan S (WA) - Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 09:55

Monday, Jul 07, 2014 at 09:55
I have found that on those long booring straight bits up north that oncoming cars with lights on are easier to see at a medium to long distance. They are great for helping to determine if it is safe to pass or not.

My major issue is only a real minor issue in that once i turn on my headlights the stereo and indash Sat Nav dim, thats okay for night time driving where you dont want bright lights in front of you. But if it is a bright day the satnav and radio are hard to see the controls.

As i said its a minor issue

Alan
AnswerID: 535581

Reply By: Member - Laurie K (WA) - Thursday, Jul 10, 2014 at 22:01

Thursday, Jul 10, 2014 at 22:01
I am a big advocate for full time headlights. I have mine wired to the ignition (after many bush walks and returning to a dead battery). It's a case of self preservation. You can be bloody minded and refuse to accept that there ARE people driving whose eyesight whilst legally 20/20, with advancing age are finding some problems with contrast and definition, but if I can alert someone else to the fact that I am potentially in their line of travel due to them misjudging or not seeing me until it is too late, then it has been a worthwhile exercise.

I recently had a car following me for many kms, who had plenty of opportunities to overtake, before they finally pulled out and nearly collected an oncoming vehicle (who DIDN'T have headlights on). It could have been you ………

I notice that there are now more signs on the road suggesting you turn on your lights "and be seen".

I also find that you can see headlights through the bush on winding roads before you see the vehicle (who is usually travelling at breakneck speed for the conditions).

YOU might think you have great eyesight, but do you? Our hearing deteriorates over time, and it's only when someone asks why the volume is turned up so loud that we start to consider that maybe all is not what it once was. The same with eyesight.

Put the ego away, don't be bloody minded …… Turn on ya lights ……. :-)



AnswerID: 535841

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