Professional Offroad Rescue/Recovery

Submitted: Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 06:38
ThreadID: 110876 Views:2809 Replies:20 FollowUps:33
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Hi All,

We're starting to kit up for starting camping again later this year (with the 4 kids) and in the past I've always relied on my recovery kit, decent hiking boots and being able to contact mates if things go wrong. However I'm a little more nervous now we have the rug rats in tow. I'm not planning on doing anything serious but things do go wrong and vehicles do break down and whilst I have options to call upon to help me out does anyone know of any professional offroad recovery companies that would come out ASAP if things do go wrong?

This would mainly be in Victoria but we will eventually be traveling further in the years to come. A quick web search revealed Reidy Recovery in Vic but no-one else.


Cheers

Zach
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Reply By: MUZBRY- Life member(Vic) - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 07:51

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 07:51
Good morning
You could use the RACV .
Muzbry
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Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 08:06

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 08:06
I didn't think they'd come out to deep dark places in the high country requiring 4WD access?
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 15:38

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 15:38
They may well do Zachary Quack, but you will get the bill for the distance outside the policy towing range. The advantage is that where ever you are, they should know where to source the nearest recovery; something you could never know for every town.

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Reply By: Member - Tony F8 - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 08:29

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 08:29
Probably not the answer your wanting,
If your vehicle is broken down, but you and your family are not in any immediate danger, best to sit back, boil the billy, have a cuppa and try to work out the options. Most recovery vehicles only have seating for 3, and from your post i figure there are 6 in your party. My immediate concern would be if something happened to you or one of your family, what do you have in place for that scenario, bugger the vehicle.
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Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 08:56

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 08:56
Yes it is actually more the family extraction I'm concerned about, we're stocked up with comms gear and recovery gear plus emergency food etc. It's just more about worst case scenario, I'll get the vehicle out eventually but it's the family I'm more concerned about.
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Reply By: TomH - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:00

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:00
Buy a satellite phone as RT may not work well in hilly country
AnswerID: 544867

Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:03

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:03
Got one, like I said communications isn't the problem, it's a case of who to call if my usual options aren't available.
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Reply By: Member - rooster350 - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:12

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:12
I would be more concerned about putting my family in a position where they may be at risk first up, I realise that it is nice to go to these out of the way places...but when one has a young and vulnerable people in tow is it really worth it.Our mob had their end of year hols at a popular inland lake in Vic from just about the time that they could walk until their teens and they loved it, fishing , swimming, camp fires , sleeping in tents and they were never in any sort of danger..except the odd case of sunburn and even then that was their own fault for not putting sun screen on...cheers
AnswerID: 544868

Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:05

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:05
I wondered if I’d get this sort of reply, thanks for the parenting advice but I think I’m allowed to make my own decisions about how I parent my children. We have as a society become very risk adverse, combine that with the fact that the vast majority of children (and adults for that matter) have never left the city and any bush experience they have is in a very controlled environment and I can’t help feel we are now missing a lot from our children’s experiences.

IMHO the very small risk is worth the benefit it brings to them, I refuse to be told that my children should be raised in cotton wool, there are huge physical and mental benefits to be gained by taking children camping and I do not consider camping to be sitting in a tent amongst 1000 other tents at the likes of Wilson’s Prom etc. They should be able to see the stars, hear the noises of the bush, smell the bush and all the other wonderful reasons we go out there, if I want to take them to a holiday park I’ll go to the Gold Coast.

We are in reality very well prepared and I’m just looking for a back up to my back up, I consider this to be responsible planning. We’re only planning 1-2 nighters not too far out for the next few years and by the time we increase that distance and time we’ll have a second 4wd in the family.

I’ve asked a fairly simple question and I’m not going to debate my parenting choices, if you wish to debate the issue of taking children into the bush then I’d appreciate it if you start a separate thread. Frankly I’d be a lot more concerned with the risk to my kids from driving in the car, camping near and swimming in a lake and being around camp fires, a lot more people get injured/die from those activities than they ever did being stranded in a 4WD.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:04

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:04
Cheers Zachary
This concept of added danger is a myth. I know of families that have raised their children on the road touring Australia and another family who did the same on a boat and they have developed into beautiful well rounded individuals
Children are born and raised in remote locations and they do just fine.

Take the necessary precautions like you have and just get out there and do it, the benefits far outweigh any disadvantages
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Follow Up By: NeilM_BoabOZ - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:14

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:14
Zachary ... I really don't think rooster350's comment required your somewhat self-righteous lengthy pious response. I read his comment as more pointing to risks of a possibly inexperienced offroader taking family beyond a point of 4WD competence. In itself, an exceptionally valuable piece of advice to keep in mind.
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Follow Up By: NeilM_BoabOZ - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:15

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:15
Let's all stay friends on this site. We are all here to help each other and for the common good of 4WD and Offroad touring
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:48

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:48
Zachary,

I was composing a response as I read your reply to rooster but I think NeilM has pretty much covered it.

Ask a question on a public forum by all means but be adult enough to expect some advice you may not agree with. No need to get all bent out of shape about it.

Maybe part of your thorough preparations should be notifying a responsible friend or family member about just where you are planning to take your family for a camping experience and when you will be returning.
I'm assuming you and your partner have done first aid courses and the additional remote area component.
You know, just in case.
As you already have your comms requirements nailed you would know that emergency services will come to the rescue in case of things really going pear shaped.
As for getting your vehicle out afterwards, surely you and a couple of mates could go back and drag it out after your family is safe.
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Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 13:53

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 13:53
I found Rooster's comments a little offensive, they basically suggested that it was irresponsible to take a young family off road and we should stick to formal and safe camp sites. I find this both offensive and an attitude I disagree with for the reasons I posted about.

If I offended then I apologise for the tone but not the content of my reply.

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Follow Up By: garrycol - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 14:19

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 14:19
I agree with Zachary - his original post was quite clear about what he was asking and as far as I can see there has only been one response re the RACV that is even relevant.

Always happens on these forums and this one in particular. People want to lecture on irrelevant material or answer the question that they prefer was asked not the one that was asked.

To respond to the original question, I don't think that there is an organisation that exists that provides the service you want. The RACV will do it if you are on a road with 2wd access but other than that I would suggest maybe something that is cobbled together before each trip - for example if you were in a 4wd club or something similar organising a few members before hand to come and get you. If I 4wd by myself locally I have a few of my club members numbers in my speed dial.

While there may be a professional outfit out there I dont know of one and I guarantee that if you had to use them it would be expensive.

Garry
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Follow Up By: wholehog - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:21

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:21
Zachary Quack, your a knob mate.

You came here with a post about "professional recovery"..yet bleat when people may suggest be smart enough to not get stuck without your recovery and safety options accounted for.

You seem to selectively be accountable in some areas of safety and security, but to expect a "professional" outfit to be available/purchasable to help you if you screw up or misjudge your own actions or natures own, them you are a fool.


'Professional" agencies when summoned will be direct in 1 action...1 action mate, preservation of life, they will come to save your kids, your wife, your family and friends, even you, but your vehicle and ego won't be in the equation, it will come a distant 2nd and 3rd, and are for you to sort out. They won't be interested.
RACV, RACQ, NRMA and a host of towies will..at a cost probably.

As suggested, get some education, 1st aid, sat phone, epirb, spot, red hankies, hook up with others if your afraid, otherwise..
caveat viator ....Let the traveller beware.

Chin up mate, you posted your query up on a public forum..that doesn't give you the right to veto genuine responses as offensive unless you have a glass chin...or do you...?
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:53

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:53
Wholehog if you go back and read his post again I think you will find that you have completely misunderstood what he is on about.

The guy is doing the right thing and investigating and establishing a plan if things do go wrong.

It is a fair question to ask whether he should be ringing his mate bluey at the pub or is there someone more professional available to assist, what is foolish about that?

Save your insults for those that go out completely unprepared with no coms or recovery gear and no backup plan and I will call them a knob with you
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Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 08:22

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 08:22
Thank you Alby.

Wholehog I'm not even going to bother replying, reread my original post, calm down and try again.
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Follow Up By: garrycol - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:50

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:50
Wholehog I think you have shown who the Knob is :-)
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Follow Up By: Top End Az - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 19:28

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 19:28
Sorry guys, but all of this agro is why I don't use exploroz too much anymore, and today only out of curiosity. Sick of mud slinging and the trolls
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Follow Up By: NeilM_BoabOZ - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 14:05

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 14:05
Hey Guys (and Girls) - What did I say on 26 January ...... ? "Let's all stay friends on this site. We are all here to help each other and for the common good of 4WD and Offroad touring" Acting like silly children and calling each other names is daft and regrettably, it discourages experienced Members and others with sound knowledge from participating in our Forums ... to the detriment and loss for those who are looking for good advice. Let's just grow up and act like sensible adults. Put aside your egos and sensitivities ... for the sake of healthy debate !!
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Follow Up By: Member - Noldi (WA) - Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 at 16:17

Thursday, Jan 29, 2015 at 16:17
I wonder if people were as quick to slag off Len Beadell when he took Connie Sue out?
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Reply By: MARIC - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:39

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 09:39
Hi Zac,
Just wondering if you are a member of a 4WD club, if so you might be able to call upon them.
If really stuck I would call either the SES or the Police. but you having. Previous experience you'll be ok :-)
Have fun and enjoy
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Reply By: Jos - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:02

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:02
Not professional recovery, but maybe worth joining some groups - for example there's the facebook Aussie 4WD Rescue Group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/4WDRescue/ ) and probably lots of others. Good to see Aussie's helping Aussie's.
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Reply By: Bigfish - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:40

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:40
If your that worried why not have another vehicle travel with you. Simple solution and if any trouble strikes you will not be stranded. If your sticking to well known tracks and have good comms, ie satfone, then you wont have any worries once again. If you have good comms get the local SES, police numbers..just in case. If its only a vehicle breakdown..do as suggested have a cuppa, relax and wait.
Maybe you could let people know exactly where you are going, times etc and have a contact time. .

good luck
AnswerID: 544875

Reply By: Kenell - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:54

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:54
Zach,

I have been in your position. I have 3 children - all grown up now and 2 of them are now much more serious campers and 4 wd fanatics than I have ever been. When going into remote environments we always tried to travel with another family when the kids were young and I too carried a sat phone. There were a few occasions though that I wondered who I could call to get me out of strife if it found me.
My boys tell me that the remote recovery providers are exorbitantly expensive so possibly not a viable alternative for you. Is it possible to set up arrangements for a mate to come to your aid if you get stuck? It might take a day or so to get to you but ultimately it is only a tank of fuel. If you haven't been to the high country for a while I think you'll find it isn't so remote anymore. Some of the spots we used to frequent and saw no one for a week at a time are now on other's lists. Shame is we often take out their rubbish when we leave.
The 4wd club option might be the way to go while the kids are young as it provides a network of similar minded people who do realise that tent cities aren't everyones' idea of camping. Hope you work it out - Australia needs more kids who will grow up to appreciate the bush and the country they live in.

Ken
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:57

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 10:57
Have a chat with some local police close to the areas you plan to visit, see what they think. Tell them your preparations so they know they're not dealing with an ill-prepared jerk.

Likewise SES.

For the week-end trips, do you have any 4WD mates you could call on in an emergency?

I reckon you have the right idea. Your kids are lucky.

Cheers
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Reply By: Member - eighty matey - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:35

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:35
G'day Zach,

by far the best insurance we've had while travelling has been our NRMA Premium Care.

When we travelled with the children they helped us to keep travelling when our motor blew up towing our camper near Benalla, then got us all home to Gosford and paid for me to get back to pick up the vehicle when it was ready.

That was in Victoria but they helped us when we had trouble in the Kimberley. That time they even accommodated the dog.

RACV has a similar setup and it's worth every cent. Whatever I pay in the future I will be in front for the rest of my life and wouldn't consider heading off without it.

Wherever you have trouble and from the moment you get in contact with the call centre they will assign someone to your case and do everything they can to get you sorted.

Steve.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:49

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:49
Have to agree with this
On two occasions I have been towed out by a fellow traveller to a recognised road and then NRMA has taken over from there offering free accomodation or a hire vehicle for my family and towing back to my home for repairs all as part of the service.

Definitely worth having
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Reply By: Sigmund - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:49

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 11:49
I know there's one guy offering professional recovery services. Probably Reidy.

Try Google again but do take a close look at the coverage of the top plan of your auto association roadside assist.
AnswerID: 544881

Reply By: NeilM_BoabOZ - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:28

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:28
For ultimate personal/family protection, security and rescue I suggest an EPIRB or PLB and the SPOT Gen 3 - a compact, rugged handheld personal tracker that supports location tracking and check-in/ok reporting as well as help and duress functions. I have my PLB in easy reach in my cab and the SPOT in my pocket when I am away from my rig. I also recall that when I signed up the subscription for SPOT I took inexpensive rescue and recovery insurance (very cheap ... haven't had to use up the insurance so I can't guarantee all it promises for less than $100 - at time of subscription only) The PLB and SPOT products are available for purchase in ExplorOz shop. EPIRB is generally more of a marine application device.
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Follow Up By: Member - eighty matey - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:37

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 12:37
I like the Help button for non-life threatening assistance.

We have now nominated our two adult kids to be the help and SOS contacts. We explained what it was about and how it worked.
We press the OK button each day when we stop to set up camp. If we find we need help or send an SOS the kids know where we are and we not stuck in the middle of nowhere without anyone knowing where we are.

Steve
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Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 19:57

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 19:57
Thanks, I've heard of SPOT but never looked into it. I'll check it out as a back up comms option.
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Reply By: Hoyks - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 15:20

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 15:20
I have taken my kids camping from when they were 6 months old and long day trips before that. People all over the world survive in poorer shelters than I can provide while traveling and as long as the kids are fed, warm and dry at the end of the day and have no pre-existing medical conditions, then the chances of them going down in a screaming heap very quickly are low.

I always worked on the plan that if things went pear shaped I'd get the family out and worry about the vehicle later. I have water, shelter and enough food to last a day or two, so if the vehicle does break down it is inconvenient, rather than life threatening.

A call to the Police or SES will see them get the people out, but the vehicle will always be a distant 2nd.

So, as you said 'I relied on my recovery kit, decent hiking boots and being able to contact mates if things go wrong' and I still do.
I pack a chain saw as fallen trees are the most likely thing to stop you in forested mountains. I also have a hand winch as if the motor on that burns out I'm in trouble. If it it horrendous weather, then you may be better off staying put for a day or two until things settle down and the roads dry out a bit.

But ultimately, my vehicle and gear is insured, so if I do have to leave it somewhere and go back later then so be it. There are a few companies that do off road towing and recovery, but it is a specialised field and is time and labor intensive they charge accordingly.

Insurance companies could probably put you in touch as I'm sure they would use their expertise on occasion.

Google "off road vehicle towing recovery vic" and a few show up.
AnswerID: 544891

Follow Up By: Oldrusty - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:47

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:47
There seems to be a large volume of people suggesting a call to the SES. The very great majority of SES members are volunteers (for example they do not get any recompense for their time and expenses incurred whilst assisting people) who have life of their own too. They do not need to put their lives on hold to assist those who have not prepared adequately for their trip. Remember that lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine. Don't regard the free service given by SES as a right - it is a life saving service not a vehicle rescue service. Get your insurance sorted out and have a nice trip.

Rusty
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Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 09:18

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 09:18
Hi Hoyks, thanks some sensible advice, especially re. the insurance company, IIRC my aquaitance who got into trouble and had to use professional offroad recovery accessed them through his insurance company.

Hi Rusty, yes I think you make a very valid point and the emergency services are just that emergency and a last resort if life is in danger. That's really why I'm curious re. the professional recovery companies, if I'm stuck and can't get out then unless it's life threatening it's up to me to pay the money and get out. (after I've exhausted all other options that don't cost me $$$$$ :-)
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 16:22

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 16:22
I got stuck once in a bad spot where a helpful passer by couldn't get me out. I called the local police (not 000) and they sent the SES who did get me out. I was waiting around for a few hours and the guys were great. On another trip, I came across a trail biker who had come off and broken some bones. I called emergency services on my satphone and they sent a chopper who airlifted him to hospital. I think that where ever you are, the local emergency services have the answer to your problem, from medical events to vehicle recovery. In all likelyhood, the actual person sent to recover your vehicle, would be the same person whether you called the police or RACV in any particular remotish area.

AnswerID: 544894

Reply By: Idler Chris - Vic - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 18:42

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 18:42
With the cost of Sat Phones these days nobody should be remote without one. When things go pear shaped there has been lots of good advice given here. Another thing to consider is to post your predicament on this web site and you are likely to get some very good advice and/or help fairly quickly. I have a family member who has a logon id to this site so that in the event that I need assistance and, I have no mobile coverage, I ring her on the Sat Phone and she makes the post. Costs nothing and you draw on the collective experience of hundreds of other travellers.
What other people think of me is none of my business.
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Reply By: Zachary Quack - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 19:54

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 19:54
Thanks all, some useful advice.

I think I'll go with a eclectic approach, start with friends, maybe look at joining a club and end up eventually with emergency services and/or professional recovery. I know the recovery services are expensive as an acquaintance had to use them a few years ago (about $3K sticks in mind but I could be wrong).

It's actually an interesting topic and I'm surprised it hasn't been discussed more (it may have been, to be fair I didn't search that hard on it before posting) as the very nature of bush travel carries this as a risk.

I was actually really surprised recently when I start looking at and purchasing communication kit, the cost of sat phones, particularly 2nd hand has dropped like a brick. When I was last out bush HF radio was about the only sensible cost effective option but after being able to buy a sat phone at $500 and use a Telstra sim in it there's no way I'll be messing around with HF anymore.

Again thanks for the help.
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Follow Up By: wholehog - Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:28

Monday, Jan 26, 2015 at 21:28
As experienced or not as you have presented, maybe have a read here before you diss the HF radio and sat phone with sim card theory...then do some more googling research.

sat phone-sim card / HF radio
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Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 08:19

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 08:19
Sorry I don't follow the point you're making?
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Reply By: Member - wicket - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 09:55

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 09:55
suggest you look at TCIS insurance, they will recover you from anywhere as part of their 4wd insurance policy

Read about it here
AnswerID: 544917

Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 19:23

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 19:23
Thanks, do you know if this is only in the event of a crash (i.e. you're going to make a claim for damage) or if you bog it or break down as well?
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Follow Up By: Member - wicket - Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 09:55

Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 09:55
as TCIS are brokers they use a range of insurers, probably best you contact them and discuss your needs.
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Reply By: The Landy - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:18

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:18
Hi Zac


An interesting proposition, although reading some of the responses I’m not sure that it is fully understood what you are asking.

So let me check.

Whilst there are emergency services that provide assistance if called upon via PLB type devices, and there are the motoring organisations that provide various levels of cover, depending on what you pay and where the vehicle is, neither may suit you specific requirement at the time. The full rescue from authorities might be far more than required, and the motoring organisation may not cover you for where you are.

You appear to be asking is there a private organisation, beyond the motoring organisations, that will take a phone call from “Zac” in the middle of the Simpson Desert, the Victorian High Country, or at the tip of Cape York asking for rescue assistance after giving an authority to debit a credit card for the service?

Such a service exists for the Simpson Desert, based in Birdsville, but this is localised to that area.

Has some merit in an age where there is a lot more 4WD traffic across Australia.

Of course, no service should remove the need for diligent planning!

Cheers Baz – The Landy

AnswerID: 544918

Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 17:59

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 17:59
Yep that's basically what I'm asking, the options after you've tried yourself, called your mates but no-ones home but it's not serious enough to warrant calling the emergency services.
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Reply By: Member Andys Adventures - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:29

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:29
Hi Zach,

There is a recovery service called Outback Recovery Service, They are in Alice Springs but say they service the whole of Australia. They recover anything from a small car to a road train and will get you from bogs to breakdown. They have adds on central Australia TV. Sorry I don't have the number for them. If they can't help they would know of someone that will.


Cheers

Andy
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Follow Up By: Member Andys Adventures - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:37

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 10:37
Phone number is 0889521087


http://www.outbackvehiclerecovery.com.au/ovr.html
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Follow Up By: pop2jocem - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 14:37

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 14:37
Thanks for that Andy. I have bookmarked those guys.

After reading the many and varied responses to Zac's original post it occurred to me that there just might be a business opportunity for someone with the necessary knowledge and equipment. It looks like it has already occurred to this mob.
Probably not a bad "add on" for someone in the tag along or general remote area tour business.
Maybe even a JIM'S RECOVERY type of franchise setup to cover where and if there are areas they are not doing already.

Considering the amount of traffic into "remote" areas these days.

Just a thought..(;=))

Cheers
Pop
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Follow Up By: Member - Colin E - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 15:13

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 15:13
There is one based in Moe or Morwell to cater for Mt BawBaw area can't remember name but also offers a taxi type service to Mt BawBaw
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FollowupID: 832385

Follow Up By: Member Andys Adventures - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 17:33

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 17:33
After reading the original post again, I am under the impression that you will be only doing day trips, as you are requiring help ASAP, meaning you are not setup for overnight stay. I hope I am wrong. Anyone going for a day trip should have equipment to spend a night in the bush in case of a breakdown, bog or flood.
Most recovery vehicles can only take 2 people with the recovered car. So extracting all the people in the car at the same time will be a challenge.
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FollowupID: 832394

Follow Up By: Zachary Quack - Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 17:54

Tuesday, Jan 27, 2015 at 17:54
Hi Andy,

Thanks for the info re. Outback Recovery Service, I'll look into it.

No we're going for overnight trips, owing to the age of the kids we'll only be doing 1-2 nights to start with and then building as they get older and get bored less easily (great in theory I know ;-)

Whenever we go bush (went bush in the past I mean) we always took comms gear (whatever was appropriate), recovery kit and emergency food and water even if it was a day trip. I'm determined not to end up on channel 7 news with a humourless policeman using my story to remind people to take more than a mobile phone into the bush :-)
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FollowupID: 832398

Reply By: Nigel Migraine - Friday, Jan 30, 2015 at 10:47

Friday, Jan 30, 2015 at 10:47
Zachary:

On this site it was inevitable you would receive responses of the "wrap yourself in cotton wool" type.

Contact me at this temporary e-mail address and I'll give you the information you seek. Incidentally, your question is a very sensible one to ask *before* heading bush.

xhiwjj@grandmasmail.com

NM
AnswerID: 545066

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